Is climate change one of the biggest crises facing humanity?

Submitted by phaster on May 7, 2018 - 3:32pm
yes
47% (15 votes)
no
47% (15 votes)
WTF is "climate change?"
0% (0 votes)
this "poll" question is dumb!
6% (2 votes)
Total votes: 32
www.cdc.gov/climateandhealth/images/climate_change_health_impacts600w.jpg
Submitted by phaster on August 17, 2019 - 9:19am.

Hobie wrote:
Light water reactors run at very high pressures. Thorium units are low pressure and 'fail safe'. Lots more details, but these are the biggest selling points.

FWIW DOE is starting to fund

https://whatisnuclear.com/thorium.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2U9HVIFt2GE

Submitted by FlyerInHi on August 23, 2019 - 9:50am.

The Amazon is burning. It is a real emergency or just a hoax?

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/a...

Submitted by phaster on September 28, 2019 - 1:20pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:

It is a real emergency or just a hoax?

hoax?!

the amazon burning is just another deleterious effect of bureaucratic/economic mismanagement and a feedback symptom associated w/ ever increasing levels of CO2 in the atmosphere

given “global dimming” (which was known 20 years ago and indicates mankind does indeed have the ability to directly influence the global climate), “decreasing pH levels in the oceans” (which is another clear signal that indicates mankind does indeed have the ability to directly influence the environment), the 2015 Berkeley lab paper on the observation of CO2 increasing greenhouse effect at the earth’s surface, the ever increasing concentrations of CO2 in the atmosphere (i.e. the keeling curve) and known physical properties of the CO2 molecule,… is just part of the overwhelming scientific evidence that basically tells mankind that we, “human beings are now carrying out a large scale geophysical experiment of a kind that could not have happened in the past nor be reproduced in the future” [AS ROGER REVELLE WROTE IN HIS 1957 PAPER]

FWIW there is a published paper (based on data gathered here in san diego) that indicates there essentially zero understanding of the mechanisms that cause climate change in the public at large,... so used some ideas I learned at various “startup week” workshops

www.SanDiegoStartUpWeek.com

to create a PDF “pitch” of basic science facts/mechanisms that explains why climate change is not a hoax!!

www.TinyURL.com/HowBigIsTheEarth

Submitted by phaster on August 24, 2019 - 11:44am.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on August 28, 2019 - 3:15pm.

Wow, according to his article, US households use 2.5x the electricity of European households. I didn’t know that we were so wasteful. I’m sure I contribute to it with my love of AC, even in beautiful SD. Lots of opportunities for conservation.

I did notice that when Europeans stay at my Airbnbs they don’t use the AC, or very little. My smart thermostat tells me, haha.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2...

Submitted by phaster on September 28, 2019 - 1:16pm.

Quote:

Dry Facts, Debate, Despair: How Not to Teach Climate Change

...The message from popular culture can seem to urge that teachers just get with the program and tell students what to think., ...But effective teachers know that leading with the attitude that anyone who doesn't accept climate change is stupid is no way to help their students learn.

...Having students debate whether climate change is solid science isn't a good strategy, because the science is, in fact, solid; there's nothing there worth debating. As multiple studies using different methods have independently concluded,

...concentrating on the dire consequences of climate change isn't a winner either: While students will certainly pay attention to hearing about climate change's role in current extreme weather events and the like, the risk is that they will wind up feeling despondent and powerless.

Dry facts, debate, doom and gloom—teachers striving to teach climate change effectively despite the obstacles to doing so can be forgiven for considering all of the above.

Fortunately, there's a better way. Climate change education is no different from any other topic in science, in that teachers want students to learn how scientists arrive at their conclusions: by collecting and evaluating evidence, assessing different explanations for the evidence, and provisionally adopting the best explanation available.

http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2019/0...

Quote:

Children suffering eco-anxiety over climate change, say psychologists

...“Children are saying things like, ‘Climate change is here as revenge, you’ve messed up the climate and nature is fighting back through climate change’,” said Caroline Hickman, a teaching fellow at the University of Bath and a CPA executive.

“There is no doubt in my mind that they are being emotionally impacted ... That real fear from children needs to be taken seriously by adults.”

Swedish teenage activist Greta Thunberg has led a worldwide youth movement demanding action on global warming through weekly “Fridays for Future” protests.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-britai...

given Greta’s address to world leaders

http://youtu.be/TMrtLsQbaok

since the definition of “hope” is a desire for a certain thing to happen,... seems to me that the seemingly angry Swed and her minions of global admirers is actually an indication that this group is full of “hope” by virtue of her/their willingness to act

Quote:

Hopeless or hopeful? How eco-anxiety affects kids and youth

...there may be some benefit to eco-anxiety -- as long as there’s not too much of it.

“Too much anxiety paralyzes you,” said Korol, relating the issue to the Yerkes–Dodson law that suggests stress can increase motivation. For many of the eco-anxious, encouraging engagement and participation in climate action may actually be helpful, she said, but so can turning down the TV.

That’s because hope is a key factor. “It’s important to counteract the nihilism and the hopelessness that people feel,” she said. “Hopelessness is the big enemy of solving any problem, including climate change. When we’re talking about children, we need to give them hope.”

http://www.ctvnews.ca/health/hopeless-or...

Submitted by The-Shoveler on September 29, 2019 - 11:22am.

I am all in favor of doing things that make sense, But I am afraid we will just end up with a binary extremism (like every thing else these days)

The middle is a very lonely place.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 29, 2019 - 2:33pm.

The-Shoveler wrote:
I am all in favor of doing things that make sense, But I am afraid we will just end up with a binary extremism (like every thing else these days)

The middle is a very lonely place.

Makes sense for who? Shareholders, future generations or our current convenience?

There is no middle.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on September 29, 2019 - 3:32pm.

My gosh Scaredy, you are right.

We Must stop globalization immediately (no more container ships) - (globalization is the biggest cause of global warming).

Everyone no more cars (must walk or ride a non-electric bike),

No more air conditioners (everyone must be forced to tear them out immediately).

No more planes or refrigerators.

Just kidding sort of LOL.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 29, 2019 - 7:03pm.

The-Shoveler wrote:
My gosh Scaredy, you are right.

We Must stop globalization immediately (no more container ships) - (globalization is the biggest cause of global warming).

Everyone no more cars (must walk or ride a non-electric bike),

No more air conditioners (everyone must be forced to tear them out immediately).

No more planes or refrigerators.

Just kidding sort of LOL.

So where then is the "middle"? 2013 std? 1970 standard? 1930? The middle from where depends on where you place the beginning and the end, and whether 9r not we are at the beginning of the end.

How urgent is it? I dont think many could give a damn about future generations. We are just trying to maximize our situation for ourselves.

Self included.

I find your hyperbole to be quite a common response. Walk a mile or two? Egad, you want my car destroyed.

It's rather sad really. No one can perceive reducing their use. It's almost like gun control discussion. Any regulation is immediately seen as the end of guns.

It is impossible to discuss intelligently or unemotionally. Kind of like the zelensky phone call, or the impact of childhood.

We are incapable of being persuaded that we are unreasonable. Dug in to the end in a pit of our own view.

Our individual ability to use up the earth is limited only by our wallet. Any discussion of the common good, let alone the future good, is taking muh stuff

I surrender.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on September 29, 2019 - 9:18pm.

How non-Binary of you. incremental change that makes sense and works.

Submitted by phaster on September 30, 2019 - 11:11am.

scaredyclassic wrote:
Our individual ability to use up the earth is limited only by our wallet. Any discussion of the common good, let alone the future good, is taking muh stuff

yup,... right now (given social norms) an average person w/ $$$$ is tempted w/ material goods or metaphorically speaking it's akin to an individual swimming against the tide

anyway,... this just crossed my desk(top) figure since this board is suppose to be about RE, ya all might find this interesting

Quote:

Citing climate risk, investors bet against mortgage market

NEW YORK (Reuters) - David Burt helped two of the protagonists of Michael Lewis’ book The Big Short bet against the U.S. mortgage market in the run-up to the 2008 financial crisis. Now he’s betting against the market again, but this time, the risk is not from underwater subprime mortgages, it’s from homes sinking under water.

As he did then, Burt has given up his full-time job to make that bet. He left his role as a portfolio manager at the $1 trillion Wellington Management last year to start an investment firm, DeltaTerra Capital, which aims to help clients manage climate risk, and, where possible, take advantage of ways the market has not yet priced in that risk. His first investment strategy is targeting residential mortgage-backed securities, or RMBS, with exposure to climate hot spots like Texas and Florida.

In doing so, Burt is joining the ranks of a small number of investors who have become worried that climate risk is underpriced in these securities, which are pools of home loans sold to investors.

“The market’s failure to integrate climate science with investment analysis has created a mispricing phenomenon that is possibly larger than the mortgage credit bubble of the mid-2000s,”

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-climat...

and FWIW this kinda guy (using NSFW "language" to describe climate change) is basically the archetypal character type that sees no problem w/ the mortgage market

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjlC02NsI...

like "the big short" of 2007/2008, I sense there are ways to profit from all the problems created by idiotic human nature,... by doing one simple thing,... just looking

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=psCF_AHuLM4

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 30, 2019 - 11:25am.

phaster wrote:
scaredyclassic wrote:
Our individual ability to use up the earth is limited only by our wallet. Any discussion of the common good, let alone the future good, is taking muh stuff

yup,... right now (given social norms) an average person w/ $$$$ is tempted w/ material goods or metaphorically speaking it's akin to an individual swimming against the tide

anyway,... this just crossed my desk(top) figure since this board is suppose to be about RE, ya all might find this interesting

Quote:

Citing climate risk, investors bet against mortgage market

NEW YORK (Reuters) - David Burt helped two of the protagonists of Michael Lewis’ book The Big Short bet against the U.S. mortgage market in the run-up to the 2008 financial crisis. Now he’s betting against the market again, but this time, the risk is not from underwater subprime mortgages, it’s from homes sinking under water.

As he did then, Burt has given up his full-time job to make that bet. He left his role as a portfolio manager at the $1 trillion Wellington Management last year to start an investment firm, DeltaTerra Capital, which aims to help clients manage climate risk, and, where possible, take advantage of ways the market has not yet priced in that risk. His first investment strategy is targeting residential mortgage-backed securities, or RMBS, with exposure to climate hot spots like Texas and Florida.

In doing so, Burt is joining the ranks of a small number of investors who have become worried that climate risk is underpriced in these securities, which are pools of home loans sold to investors.

“The market’s failure to integrate climate science with investment analysis has created a mispricing phenomenon that is possibly larger than the mortgage credit bubble of the mid-2000s,”

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-climat...

and FWIW this kinda guy (using NSFW "language" to describe climate change) is basically the archetypal character type that sees no problem w/ the mortgage market

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjlC02NsI...

like "the big short" of 2007/2008, I sense there are ways to profit from all the problems created by idiotic human nature,... by doing one simple thing,... just looking

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=psCF_AHuLM4

Tough to get the timing right on that one.

I feel guilty buying new clothing, but have no problem investing in destructive corporations.

I would be happy to make money off of death and misery and environmental destruction or failed mortgages, as long as I am somewhat distanced from it.

But the money may not be spent.

Such is the mental illness I suffer from

Submitted by The-Shoveler on September 30, 2019 - 1:57pm.

IMO buying a home in Florida or TX without flood or hurricane insurance was probably "never" a good Idea.

Also in the case of both Florida & TX , The populations have been booming for last 20 or more years so you just have a lot more homes built in harm's way.

Submitted by sdduuuude on September 30, 2019 - 5:37pm.

phaster wrote:
the amazon burning is just another deleterious effect of bureaucratic/economic mismanagement

Yes, so lets make sure we trust in the bureaucrats and politicians to solve it cuz they know just how to and have a proven track record of working together with other leaders to do awesome things for the world.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on October 1, 2019 - 10:00am.

scaredyclassic wrote:
The-Shoveler wrote:
My gosh Scaredy, you are right.

We Must stop globalization immediately (no more container ships) - (globalization is the biggest cause of global warming).

Everyone no more cars (must walk or ride a non-electric bike),

No more air conditioners (everyone must be forced to tear them out immediately).

No more planes or refrigerators.

Just kidding sort of LOL.

So where then is the "middle"? 2013 std? 1970 standard? 1930? The middle from where depends on where you place the beginning and the end, and whether 9r not we are at the beginning of the end.

How urgent is it? I dont think many could give a damn about future generations. We are just trying to maximize our situation for ourselves.

Self included.

I find your hyperbole to be quite a common response. Walk a mile or two? Egad, you want my car destroyed.

It's rather sad really. No one can perceive reducing their use. It's almost like gun control discussion. Any regulation is immediately seen as the end of guns.

It is impossible to discuss intelligently or unemotionally. Kind of like the zelensky phone call, or the impact of childhood.

We are incapable of being persuaded that we are unreasonable. Dug in to the end in a pit of our own view.

Our individual ability to use up the earth is limited only by our wallet. Any discussion of the common good, let alone the future good, is taking muh stuff

I surrender.

I am so much in love with you scaredy! You are so smart and I get everything you say. You have a special talent for explaining things so well in few words.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on October 2, 2019 - 11:26am.

FlyerInHi wrote:
scaredyclassic wrote:
The-Shoveler wrote:
My gosh Scaredy, you are right.

We Must stop globalization immediately (no more container ships) - (globalization is the biggest cause of global warming).

Everyone no more cars (must walk or ride a non-electric bike),

No more air conditioners (everyone must be forced to tear them out immediately).

No more planes or refrigerators.

Just kidding sort of LOL.

So where then is the "middle"? 2013 std? 1970 standard? 1930? The middle from where depends on where you place the beginning and the end, and whether 9r not we are at the beginning of the end.

How urgent is it? I dont think many could give a damn about future generations. We are just trying to maximize our situation for ourselves.

Self included.

I find your hyperbole to be quite a common response. Walk a mile or two? Egad, you want my car destroyed.

It's rather sad really. No one can perceive reducing their use. It's almost like gun control discussion. Any regulation is immediately seen as the end of guns.

It is impossible to discuss intelligently or unemotionally. Kind of like the zelensky phone call, or the impact of childhood.

We are incapable of being persuaded that we are unreasonable. Dug in to the end in a pit of our own view.

Our individual ability to use up the earth is limited only by our wallet. Any discussion of the common good, let alone the future good, is taking muh stuff

I surrender.

I am so much in love with you scaredy! You are so smart and I get everything you say. You have a special talent for explaining things so well in few words.

IRL I'd say most people find me irritating. But thnx

Submitted by phaster on October 17, 2019 - 6:45pm.

scaredyclassic wrote:
phaster wrote:
scaredyclassic wrote:
Our individual ability to use up the earth is limited only by our wallet. Any discussion of the common good, let alone the future good, is taking muh stuff

yup,... right now (given social norms) an average person w/ $$$$ is tempted w/ material goods or metaphorically speaking it's akin to an individual swimming against the tide

anyway,... this just crossed my desk(top) figure since this board is suppose to be about RE, ya all might find this interesting

Quote:

Citing climate risk, investors bet against mortgage market

NEW YORK (Reuters) - David Burt helped two of the protagonists of Michael Lewis’ book The Big Short bet against the U.S. mortgage market in the run-up to the 2008 financial crisis. Now he’s betting against the market again, but this time, the risk is not from underwater subprime mortgages, it’s from homes sinking under water.

As he did then, Burt has given up his full-time job to make that bet. He left his role as a portfolio manager at the $1 trillion Wellington Management last year to start an investment firm, DeltaTerra Capital, which aims to help clients manage climate risk, and, where possible, take advantage of ways the market has not yet priced in that risk. His first investment strategy is targeting residential mortgage-backed securities, or RMBS, with exposure to climate hot spots like Texas and Florida.

In doing so, Burt is joining the ranks of a small number of investors who have become worried that climate risk is underpriced in these securities, which are pools of home loans sold to investors.

“The market’s failure to integrate climate science with investment analysis has created a mispricing phenomenon that is possibly larger than the mortgage credit bubble of the mid-2000s,”

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-climat...

and FWIW this kinda guy (using NSFW "language" to describe climate change) is basically the archetypal character type that sees no problem w/ the mortgage market

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjlC02NsI...

like "the big short" of 2007/2008, I sense there are ways to profit from all the problems created by idiotic human nature,... by doing one simple thing,... just looking

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=psCF_AHuLM4

Tough to get the timing right on that one.

I feel guilty buying new clothing, but have no problem investing in destructive corporations.

yup pretty tough to to get the timing right on an "investment" bet,... at least this time around some of those w/ access to the controls, seem to at least recognize things aren’t,… “Sunshine, Lollipops And Rainbows”

Quote:

Bank Regulators Present a Dire Warning of Financial Risks From Climate Change

WASHINGTON — Home values could fall significantly.

Banks could stop lending to flood-prone communities.

Towns could lose the tax money they need to build sea walls and other protections.

These are a few of the warnings published on Thursday by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco regarding the financial risks of climate change. The collection of 18 papers by outside experts amounts to one of the most specific and dire accountings of the dangers posed to businesses and communities in the United States — a threat so significant that the nation’s central bank seems increasingly compelled to address it.

The Federal Reserve has been slow to talk about climate risks compared with central banks in other countries. That could be partly because the topic is more politically polarized in the United States than many other places, so talking about it exposes the Fed — which is meant to be politically independent — to accusations that it is straying into partisan territory. Already, the central bank is a frequent target of President Trump, who has criticized its interest-rate decisions for hindering economic growth.

http://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/17/climat...

Submitted by jmpman on November 13, 2019 - 9:43pm.

Yes, but I’ll be dead before any noticeable impact other than an elevated AC bill.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on November 14, 2019 - 2:19pm.

jmpman wrote:
Yes, but I’ll be dead before any noticeable impact other than an elevated AC bill.

Even if you don’t care about the climate, you can still support technologies that improve our lives. For example electric cars would make cities a lot cleaner, quieter and enjoyable places to live in.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on November 14, 2019 - 11:20pm.

Venice is underwater. But who cares? it’s an old city that time has passed by anyway.

Flooded Venice had tourists taking selfies and residents in tears
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/eur...

Submitted by phaster on December 1, 2019 - 8:44am.

jmpman wrote:
Yes, but I’ll be dead before any noticeable impact other than an elevated AC bill.

think people should ponder a hedge strategy because,...

suppose humanity needs to build various kinds of infrastructure to address very noticeable adverse symptoms of “climate change” AND what-if the global finance system isn’t working (as expected)

FYI

Quote:

Record high global debt of $250 trillion ‘could curb efforts to tackle climate risk,’ report warns

The global debt ballooned to a record high of more than $250 trillion and shows no sign of slowing down, according to a new report from the Institute of International Finance (IIF), which warned that this massive debt could impact international efforts to mitigate climate change.

Worldwide debt surged by $7.5 trillion in the first half of 2019, urging researchers to predict that the global debt would exceed $255 trillion by the end of the year.

…The bulk of the global debt – or more than 60% – is from the U.S. and China, the report released on Thursday found.

…Hidden debt and other “poorly understood contingent liabilities” can create additional uncertainty, the report said, “and could leave some sovereigns struggling to source international and domestic capital – including to combat climate change.”

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/record-hi...

and FWIW the various market condition(s) why I think TSHTF might happen sooner than most people w/ an investors outlook would expect

https://www.piggington.com/shiller_pe_ra...

Submitted by svelte on December 1, 2019 - 5:46pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:
Venice is underwater. But who cares? it’s an old city that time has passed by anyway.

Venice flooding is a common event.

Venice FloodingVenice Flooding

Submitted by FlyerInHi on December 26, 2019 - 11:20pm.

I guess the deplorables are still channeling Michelle Bachman and still want to burn incandescent bulbs. Only morons would do so. Unless, you have a very,very, very special application, it’s really stupid to still use incandescent. The Vegas casinos that need special moods and lighting effects in their restaurants and luxury suites have already converted to LED. What type of incandescent lighting do households really need?

https://earther.gizmodo.com/trump-wages-...