Younger workers everywhere

User Forum Topic
Submitted by moneymaker on February 17, 2016 - 3:57am

I've noticed lately that Home Depot, Kohl's, among others have a lot of young workers. Is it just me getting old or have others noticed the work force getting younger?

Submitted by The-Shoveler on February 17, 2016 - 7:01am.

Yep the biggest bulge in population is now about 25-26 years old.

Move over boomers.

Submitted by spdrun on February 17, 2016 - 9:51am.

I'm rooting for Zika so millennial twitter-twits will be very circumspect about breeding and starting families. And, if a company invents a coin-op (or Google-Pay) D&C machine that can be installed on any street corner, I'm investing!

Submitted by FlyerInHi on February 17, 2016 - 11:10am.

Millennials don't really want babies and suburban houses.

They will be in real or made up urban centers. Mission Valley over Escondido.

There is reason developers are building those mega apartment complexes. Time will tell what millennials end up buying as they age.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on February 17, 2016 - 11:18am.

That's a myth, They really want the same things boomers did, there is just a small minority that wants to live the urban life style, but they are much hyped.

Submitted by bearishgurl on February 17, 2016 - 12:04pm.

The-Shoveler wrote:
That's a myth, They really want the same things boomers did, there is just a small minority that wants to live the urban life style, but they are much hyped.
My "millenial" kids made themselves scarce when it was time to mow the lawn, weed and tend to the gardens (clipping, hedging, transplanting, fertilizing, hauling bags of dirt, etc, etc) over the years. I'm here to tell you that they DON'T WANT this kind of life. It's wa-a-a-ay too time consuming when their time could be better spent twitter-twitting on the way to check out the latest micro-brewery in wine country in their "spare" time, lol....

Now, if they could start their OWN micro-brewery in said wine country, they would elect to have a gardener to assist them on their 2+ AC lot :-P

Meanwhile, the likes of Kelseyville are filling up with boomer vacation-home buyers who are slowly and steadily pricing the millenials out of their "pipe dreams" to (prematurely) exit the 9-6 grind in SF and SV. This is at least one typical pipe dream of millenial biz-degree holders who are NOT carrying any student loans (my kids never took any out). We'll see how all this turns out over the coming years.

I'm a boomer who has recently been "priced out" of several of these "bucolic" towns myself (with 60-100+ yo housing) :-0

Submitted by FlyerInHi on February 17, 2016 - 12:23pm.

Shoveler, were're a big country so there will always be a place for the surburbs like the inland empire. In fact, I believe that the area around UCR will densify and will become an "urban area".

But look at the facts. Back in the 80s, people were moving out of the cities.

Now, young and not so young professionals want to live in the city, from Portland, OR to Washington, DC. (that is displacing poor people to the older, closer-in suburbs).

Look at the sales histories.... if you had bought a small building in the city for the price of the then suburban house, you'd now have an awesome sought after luxury loft worth several $ millions.

Now, the average person cannot sell in the suburbs and move into the city, only the better off professionals or better can do that.

Demographically, we now have more educated, worldly immigrants from around the world. They are used to living in apartments in their home countries. I believe we will see more of that transplanted to the USA. But they want some things more American such as car ownership and parking. So in the decades to come, we will see more mid-rise developments (under 10 stories), with some sprinkling of high rises, in the Irvine/Orange County areas, San Gabriel areas, West LA areas.

Example: Playa Vista, a new development where Google bought land.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on February 17, 2016 - 12:28pm.

I need to find the link again, but the lennar and DR horton did a survey and they found their millenial buyers really wanted to live a suburban lifestyle (maybe close to the city true), but they did not want to live in condos etc... or in a crowded urban centers.

Anyway I need to find that link again. but the issue is even if they did there is no way (at least in Socal) that they could all fit in the existing urban centers so there would need to be new urban centers created.

Yes I agree though next to UCR will be a new urban center so will eastvale LOL.

Submitted by bearishgurl on February 17, 2016 - 12:33pm.

Those longtime bay area dwelling boomers (especially those who are still with the same partner for 40+ years and bought their original homes in the '70's) have MUCH DEEPER pockets than the rest of us.

In other words, bay-area boomer couples who haven't suffered major health or business setbacks or divorce(s) and who have BOTH been gainfully employed all of their lives (whether they have begun collecting their pensions or not) are typically worth a whole lot more than similarly-situated SD County couples. This is just by virtue of the higher pay scale there (leading to higher pensions) and MUCH higher property values.

I don't care if they lived all their lives in Hayward, Livermore, Concord or even Vallejo! They're still financially better off today than 90% of their "brethren" in the rest of the country.

There are TONS of these boomer couples in the bay area (I know a few) and they're buying vacation, pre-retirement and retirement homes (for all cash) wherever their hearts' desire.

In the mid-1970's, I had a chance to relocate (with a prospective roommate) to San Mateo and a good job waiting for me in Half Moon Bay and instead chose to relocate to SD ... and the rest is history. That's one BIG mistake I made as a young person that I deeply regret now. But who knew at that time what would become of the (then "sleepy") SF peninsula?

I also declined an offer of admission to Cal at the age of 18 .... another bad mistake .... HUGE.

I had no advice, direction or support from parents or other relatives at that time and it is now wa-a-a-ay too late to unring that bell :=0

Submitted by FlyerInHi on February 17, 2016 - 12:38pm.

The-Shoveler wrote:

Anyway I need to find that link again. but the issue is even if they did there is no way (at least in Socal) that they could all fit in the existing urban centers so there would need to be new urban centers created.

Yes I agree though next to UCR will be a new urban center so will eastvale LOL.

Absolutely. There will be new urban centers created out of nowhere of through redevelopment. Grantville, east of Mission Valley, just got new large apartment complex. That are is slated for redevelopment.

BTW, what is the smell in Eastvale? Whenever I drive through, I can smell cow dung or something like that.

It will depend on jobs. But like BG said, millenials don't want yards. They want fast Internet.

Incidentally, I foresee more suburban development on postage stamp lots or townhouses. You get the privacy of an SFR without the lot maintenance issues.

Cool people will want to live in urban areas are there are restaurants and bodegas. Developers can create them. Glendale is another example. That city is so much better since Americana opened. It revitalized the city and increasing the tax base. I'm sure city hall and the municipal employees are quite happy with the new revenues.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on February 17, 2016 - 12:43pm.

LOL yes but so did Norco not long ago, the cows etc... will be moved soon.

I don't want to live there but the planning is already done, it will be a big city (>200K population).

Submitted by bearishgurl on February 17, 2016 - 12:48pm.

The-Shoveler wrote:
I need to find the link again, but the lennar and DR horton did a survey and they found their millenial buyers really wanted to live a suburban lifestyle (maybe close to the city true), but they did not want to live in condos etc... or in a crowded urban centers.

Anyway I need to find that link again. but the issue is even if they did there is no way (at least in Socal) that they could all fit in the existing urban centers so there would need to be new urban centers created.

Yes I agree though next to UCR will be a new urban center so will eastvale LOL.

The young families in my area (headed by millenial parents) who are renting SFRs (on std or bigger lots) mostly can't see fit to take care of their yard and gardens. Some of their LL's provide gardeners and some don't. I can't believe how lazy this group is, especially the SAHP. I worked FT, took care of the house AND garden (both on the large side) and even pool and ALSO took care of my kids on the eves/weekend and did ALL the grocery shopping!

I feel that a lot of millenial parents can't even walk and chew gum at the same time. Clearly, the care of their kid(s) just overwhelms them to the point that they miss their trash pickup day ... among other, obvious issues with a SFR that should have been taken care of.

Perhaps most of these young parents (20's) should be raising their kids in apts or condos where the landscaping is taken care of and enclosed dumpsters are provided. This group doesn't park in their garages anyway (they're used to store junk). They're CLUEless on how to properly run a household in a SFR.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on February 17, 2016 - 12:56pm.

bearishgurl wrote:

I had no advice, direction or support from parents or other relatives at that time and it is now wa-a-a-ay too late to unring that bell :=0

Don't look back... look forward.

As a San Diego resident with equity, you're still better off than tons of people in the country or the world.

There are so many locations in the world that skyrocketed in value in the last few decades. The SF Bay area, Washington DC, NYC are American examples. London, Singapore, Vancouver, Beijing, Hanoi, etc....

One of my infrequent neighbors in Vegas is from Vancouver. He told me how he made a fortune because he kept on investing in real estate. The guy started out as a marine engineer and used to paint and fix his own properties. Now his wife can indulge in Bentleys and Louis Vuitton. She's not a trophy wife but his one and only wife. She joked that she saw a "doer" so she allowed him to approach her.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on February 17, 2016 - 1:04pm.

bearishgurl wrote:
The young families in my area (headed by millenial parents) who are renting SFRs (on std or bigger lots) mostly can't see fit to take care of their yard and gardens. Some of their LL's provide gardeners and some don't. I can't believe how lazy this group is, especially the SAHP. I worked FT, took care of the house AND garden (both on the large side) and even pool and ALSO took care of my kids on the eves/weekend and did ALL the grocery shopping!

I feel that a lot of millenial parents can't even walk and chew gum at the same time. Clearly, the care of their kid(s) just overwhelms them to the point that they miss their trash pickup day ... among other, obvious issues with a SFR that should have been taken care of.

Perhaps most of these young parents (20's) should be raising their kids in apts or condos where the landscaping is taken care of and enclosed dumpsters are provided. This group doesn't park in their garages anyway (they're used to store junk). They're CLUEless on how to properly run a household in a SFR.

You're a can do feminist who takes pride in doing what needs to be done and doing it well. Young women are not like that anymore.

Millenials have a lot of weaknesses and psychological problems enabled by Prozac and drugs like that. I think the 80s is when we started drugging all the kids.

It could be why Millenials like Bernie Sanders and don't mind socialism.

Submitted by bearishgurl on February 17, 2016 - 1:08pm.

The-Shoveler wrote:
LOL yes but so did Norco not long ago, the cows etc... will be moved soon.

I don't want to live there but the planning is already done, it will be a big city (>200K population).

Shoveler, I take it you are referring to the swaths of land on either side of the *new* (redirected) I-15 in RIV Co. Yes, I've driven up/down that stretch a few times and there is a LOT of newer commercial development in that corridor.

IIRC, those 2 dairy farms you're referring to were 2 very LARGE parcels whose owners elected NOT to sell to Big Development. That is, AFTER Big D drew up plans for their land as part of their "master planned community," lol. Thus, these (agricultural) parcels (on the E/SE side?) of the MP community are bordering it and the new buyers in it currently have the "cow smells," lolol.

It seems like Big D (Lennar, et al) jumped the gun here. They began construction long before successfully acquiring all the land they needed to form their contiguous master-planned community.

Are your SURE Big D has actually acquired these dairy farms?

Since the dairy farms were always there and in use, will this land be part of a CFD (as the adjacent new-home communities are) if/when it is sold? Refresh my memory. Weren't the dairy farms in an unincorporated area?

Submitted by spdrun on February 17, 2016 - 1:11pm.

(1) People support Sanders because what he's proposing isn't all that radical. Rooting out corruption, lowering the ratio of average tuition to income, base level of public insurance that works nationally. He's not a socialist in the sense that he wants to nationalize everything.
(2) People who live in rental SFRs likely see the situation as temporary and don't want to invest too much in the yard, etc. Also, working hours are pretty bad, especially when both parents are working full-time.

Submitted by bearishgurl on February 17, 2016 - 1:27pm.

spdrun wrote:
(1) People support Sanders because what he's proposing isn't all that radical. Rooting out corruption, lowering the ratio of average tuition to income, base level of public insurance that works nationally. He's not a socialist in the sense that he wants to nationalize everything.
(2) People who live in rental SFRs likely see the situation as temporary and don't want to invest too much in the yard, etc. Also, working hours are pretty bad, especially when both parents are working full-time.
In SoCal, it is difficult to rent a 2+ bdrm condo or house without signing a one-year lease. That's not "temporary."

In the cases I posted about, only ONE parent is working. The other parent stays at home with the kids (who take naps) and has ample time to pick up all the pennysavers and junk mail laying in their driveway (and washed down the curb) and the junk food wrappers that spilled out of their vehicle and their kid's litter and small toys blowing about their front yard and sidewalk.

These families HAVE private, fenced backyards to play in and should also be using them to store all their junk, toys and last December's X-mas tree that they can't see fit to sit out for the trash.

I could go on ... and on but that is the gist of it. This group is LAZY and oblivious to their surroundings. When I walk my dog, we often trip over all this sh!t and diapers that "fell out" of last week's trash can on city sidewalks and it is always in front of the homes of millenial tenants with kids ... not to mention what an eyesore they can be.

Submitted by spdrun on February 17, 2016 - 1:28pm.

A one-year lease is temporary in the scheme of things for landscaping. So we're not just just talking about bad landscaping, but about actually litter.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on February 17, 2016 - 1:36pm.

BG, I agree about LAZY. Lazy and indulgent.

It used to be that suburban dads would wash cars and do yard work on weekends. Now people don't even to do that anymore. They just want to pay someone to wash their cars and do their gardening. That will cost them in the long run.

And women do their nails, even when they are on a budget! How are they supposed to do any work that needs done?

These days people expect more services. They are eating out a lot more. They are leasing cars instead of saving for downpayment or paying cash. Maybe that's just sign of increasing standard of living.

Submitted by bearishgurl on February 17, 2016 - 1:36pm.

spdrun wrote:
A one-year lease is temporary in the scheme of things for landscaping. So we're not just just talking about bad landscaping, but about actually litter.
Yeah, my area is a "victim" of the "flipper-buy-and-hold phenomenon" of several years ago. And, to a lesser extent, the "heir-hold-forever-plan-cuz-property-taxes-are-minuscule" phenomenon.

Trash pickup costs twice as much if you order a family-sized waste-cart. So these young families try to get by with the smallest waste cart left behind at the property and overflow it weekly. If there is any trash sitting on the curb outside the can and it is not a bulky item (i.e. curtain rod or kid's toy, etc), then it will not get picked up.

Seriously, these kids who can't afford all the bills that go with renting an SFR (water, trash, sewer, gas and electric) should rent an apt/condo where some of them are traditionally paid by the LL.

Submitted by bearishgurl on February 17, 2016 - 1:41pm.

I'm going to start being more "Trump-like" and saying something to the worst offenders. They're degrading the neighborhood.

Submitted by bearishgurl on February 17, 2016 - 1:47pm.

Maybe its best that millenials DON'T buy SFRs and buy condos instead. They're not capable of properly taking care of one. This group, as a whole, is incompetent when it comes to practical living skills. They must have been asleep at the switch and not paying attention when mommy and daddy were mowing, gardening, DIYing, taking out the trash and cleaning house. OR, I suspect they were over-burdened with extra-curricular activities which took up all their time. I know mine were, but at least they know the basics of cooking, cleaning and doing laundry.

Submitted by bearishgurl on February 17, 2016 - 1:53pm.

At this point, I would seriously consider a detached over-55 community if it didn't have HOA dues.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on February 17, 2016 - 2:02pm.

BG, even in condos, you're not supposed to leave large items in trash bins.

I once saw a older woman giving a piece of her mind to someone who left a mattress by the bin. But the guy didn't care. He left it anyway.

Some people are extremely lazy and inconsiderate. They park by the mailbox clusters and block driveways; they overflow trash bins because they can't walk over to the next closest bin, don't pick up after their pets, run old cars that drip oil on driveways, etc...

Submitted by FlyerInHi on February 17, 2016 - 2:09pm.

spdrun wrote:
(1) People support Sanders because what he's proposing isn't all that radical. Rooting out corruption, lowering the ratio of average tuition to income, base level of public insurance that works nationally. He's not a socialist in the sense that he wants to nationalize everything.

True, nothing radical.

But I doubt the average person knows the details of policy. I'm just saying that the word "socialist" doesn't sound bad to millennial.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on February 17, 2016 - 2:13pm.

BG, young people don't really care about weeds or overgrown yards. In fact they believe it's best to let nature be. I heard it's a new trend. Manicured yards are too establishment.

They want to grow pot and sprinkle vegetable seeds around so whatever grows will grow.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on February 17, 2016 - 2:17pm.

bearishgurl wrote:
At this point, I would seriously consider a detached over-55 community if it didn't have HOA dues.

One of my friends retired at Sun City Anthem in Las Vegas. Many houses have attached casitas for visiting relatives. It's very well maintained and you can clearly see that owners over 55 take better care of their properties. It's not any cheaper than non age-restricted communities.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on February 17, 2016 - 2:36pm.

This was not even a Idea in a developers mind 6 years ago.

http://www.eastvaleca.gov/city-hall/plan...

Now its the fastest growing area in Socal.

Submitted by poorgradstudent on February 17, 2016 - 3:15pm.

This is likely a direct result of the falling unemployment rate. When unemployment is at 9%, retail businesses can pick and choose 25 year olds with full availability and a few years work experience vs. high school or college kids with class schedules and the reliability issues of teenagers.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on February 17, 2016 - 3:46pm.

The-Shoveler wrote:
This was not even a Idea in a developers mind 6 years ago.

http://www.eastvaleca.gov/city-hall/plan...

Now its the fastest growing area in Socal.

Affordability. As long as affordability is an issue, people will be pushed to the suburbs and exurbs. But cool people do prefer to be closer the city.

I foresee more 3 bedroom condos being built.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on February 17, 2016 - 4:12pm.

Only about 5-8% or so can afford to be cool urban people.

A only a small percentage can fit, it's not going to stop sprawl.

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