When was a bathtub last used in your house by an adult (for bathing/recreation but not showering)

Submitted by no_such_reality on January 20, 2011 - 12:06pm
Within the last week
27% (12 votes)
Within the last month
9% (4 votes)
Within the last three months
2% (1 vote)
Within the last six months
2% (1 vote)
Within the last year
4% (2 votes)
longer, I don't know, or never
56% (25 votes)
Total votes: 45
Submitted by an on January 20, 2011 - 12:50pm.

So far, it seems like the majority don't really use bath tubs. To those who are looking to buy, if you see a remodel master bath, do you prefer to have a huge walking shower w/ all the bells and whistles or a smaller shower and a jet tub?

Submitted by briansd1 on January 20, 2011 - 1:19pm.

I think that not having a bath tub only qualifies the bathroom as a half-bath for resales purposes.

Submitted by no_such_reality on January 20, 2011 - 1:27pm.

My preferences would be

  • Tub and separate shower over just shower.
  • Just shower over shower/tub combo.
  • Large shower only over tub and small shower.
  • Jet tub over tub.
  • In either case, I suspect the tub would be used roughly once every six months or so. Probably a little more if a jet tub and it was oversized. By large shower, I mean large enough that a six foot broad shouldered male is going to easily turn around in without bumping stuff and not those 6x8 foot monstrosities with a bench and pillow in them.

    In all cases, I'm willing to pay exactly $0 for having one feature over another with the exception of the small shower which is a cross of the list infraction unless the house is discounted a BR remodel.

    All that said, I consider the giant spa like bathrooms in new construction to a be genius of marketing of little practical use. Basically Kitchen and Bath are were the builder can easily present the house to be 'premium'. By allocating a large space to a spa-like bathroom, the builder cuts base building costs, positions the model as 'ultra-premium' and best of both worlds, everything that goes in it is an upgrade with high margins the evokes the emotional response out of the buyers for their making of the American dream.

    In other words, Cha-ching $$$.

    Submitted by an on January 20, 2011 - 2:32pm.

    briansd1 wrote:
    I think that not having a bath tub only qualifies the bathroom as a half-bath for resales purposes.

    Not true, at least based on the listings I've seen where there's only a shower. They still count that as a whole bathroom. 1/2 bath is where you only have a sink and a toilet. 1/4 bath is only sink. Some might say shower only is a 3/4 bath, but I rarely see people list a house w/ a 3/4 bath.

    Submitted by briansd1 on January 20, 2011 - 2:36pm.

    Yes, you are correct. Shower only is 3/4 bath.

    Submitted by enron_by_the_sea on January 20, 2011 - 2:44pm.

    How does one use bathtub for recreation? :)

    Submitted by UCGal on January 20, 2011 - 4:18pm.

    The kids still sometimes do the tub thing... Although they've moved more towards showers these days. I think they took baths within the last month.

    I've never been a bath person. But my mother was. She took baths several times a week.

    I have friends who de-stress after a long day at work by soaking in a tub with a glass of wine. One of these friends is a guy (and he's straight, too)... so it's not a strictly female thing.

    Submitted by jpinpb on January 20, 2011 - 4:50pm.

    Last time I took a soak was way too long ago. One of these days I'll have a nice, big tub I can lounge in w/some bubble bath and some candles.

    Submitted by CA renter on January 20, 2011 - 10:27pm.

    AN wrote:
    So far, it seems like the majority don't really use bath tubs. To those who are looking to buy, if you see a remodel master bath, do you prefer to have a huge walking shower w/ all the bells and whistles or a smaller shower and a jet tub?

    In our case, the reason I voted "not in a long time" was because our master bath only has a shower, and the only bathtub in the house is the standard kids' bathtub -- hardly comfortable for relaxing in (trust me, I've tried).

    A nice, big bathtub is something I hope to have in our "purchased" house; I've been waiting a long, long time for it. Someday...

    Submitted by CA renter on January 20, 2011 - 10:34pm.

    While we're on the subject of bathrooms...

    The current fad in master bathrooms is to have an open bedroom-bathroom setup with the toilet in a claustrophobic closet. Is it me, or is anyone else bothered by the fact that one spouse cannot get ready (if it's dark) without waking the other spouse up with the lights. Also, do we really want to watch each other shaving, clipping toenails, plucking eyebrows, applying makeup, etc.? And, do we really like sitting in a small closet without any storage (think about extra toilet paper or female "stuff") when using the bathroom?

    I really prefer to have the old-fashioned bathroom where everything is in one room and there is a door between the bedroom and bathroom.

    Is there a reason for the change to the open concept, and what are the benefits of this "open bedroom/bathroom" setup?

    Where does everyone else stand on this issue?

    Submitted by enron_by_the_sea on January 20, 2011 - 11:26pm.

    My wife absolutely hates open bedroom/bathroom concept. We ended up actually putting a curtain between the two.

    I am really curious what does this really achieve? I can't think of even one reason why it is useful!

    Submitted by enron_by_the_sea on January 20, 2011 - 11:30pm.

    Oh by the way what is the deal with 2 big windows in the corner where the bathtub is put (on the second floor)? Who likes to watch their backyard/sideyard while they are taking a bubble bath?

    I have seen at least 4 houses like that (all mid-90s)

    Submitted by CA renter on January 20, 2011 - 11:35pm.

    enron_by_the_sea wrote:
    My wife absolutely hates open bedroom/bathroom concept. We ended up actually putting a curtain between the two.

    I am really curious what does this really achieve? I can't think of even one reason why it is useful!

    That's exactly it...there doesn't seem to be any benefit (quite the opposite), yet every builder has been doing it for years! It makes no sense to me, which is why I wondered if I'm missing something.

    When/if we buy a house and it happens to have an "open bathroom" setup, the first thing we're going to do is install a door and tear down the walls around the toilet closet.

    Submitted by CA renter on January 20, 2011 - 11:38pm.

    enron_by_the_sea wrote:
    Oh by the way what is the deal with 2 big windows in the corner where the bathtub is put (on the second floor)? Who likes to watch their backyard/sideyard while they are taking a bubble bath?

    I have seen at least 4 houses like that (all mid-90s)

    As long as neighbors can't see in, it might be nice to look out on some nice landscaping or views of some sort. For those who love to relax in the bathtub, looking at trees, flowers, mountains, etc. is nicer than staring at a wall, IMHO. Of course, if neighbors can see in, there shouldn't be any large windows in the bathroom.

    Submitted by sdduuuude on January 20, 2011 - 11:59pm.

    enron_by_the_sea wrote:
    My wife absolutely hates open bedroom/bathroom concept. We ended up actually putting a curtain between the two.

    I am really curious what does this really achieve? I can't think of even one reason why it is useful!

    From a layout perspective, it helps fit more into a smaller space while making the bedroom feel physically larger.

    I'm not saying I like it, but if you have ever had to design a bedroom, bathroom and closet into a fixed space, you know exactly what I mean. It is very tempting when designing to lay it out this way.

    I agree that the "getting ready" space should be separate from the sleeping space. In our new setup we have a door between the bathroom and walk-in closet so we can get clean and get changed without interrupting the sleeper.

    Submitted by temeculaguy on January 21, 2011 - 12:16am.

    I'm with you CA renter, the current design trend is flawed and it's amazing it has survived for more than 10 years. It completely ignores the fact that many master bedrooms are shared by two people and those people do not always wake up and get ready at the same time. Luckily for me I'm not sharing my bathroom, but architects shouldn't design homes for the small percentage of weird bachelors out there (self included).

    My current house has a jaccuzi tub as the bath, seperate from the shower. Save your money, it's a pure novelty. Mine doesn't continually heat the water. So on the rare occassion it seems like a good idea, after five minutes the water gets cold because of the jets and the bubbles. It just happened to be in the repo I bought but if had paid for it I'd be pissed. They cost about 2k, so in two years I've used it twice, that's 1k per use. I can see twenty miles out the the window from the tub and nobody can see in, yet the fact that I cannot keep the water at a certain temperature destroys the potential relaxation. If anyone is debating a tub like that, get it with some sort of independent heating system otherwise it is like a really nice car that doesn't have an engine. It looks good, but that's about it.

    Submitted by an on January 21, 2011 - 12:16am.

    CA renter wrote:
    While we're on the subject of bathrooms...

    The current fad in master bathrooms is to have an open bedroom-bathroom setup with the toilet in a claustrophobic closet. Is it me, or is anyone else bothered by the fact that one spouse cannot get ready (if it's dark) without waking the other spouse up with the lights. Also, do we really want to watch each other shaving, clipping toenails, plucking eyebrows, applying makeup, etc.? And, do we really like sitting in a small closet without any storage (think about extra toilet paper or female "stuff") when using the bathroom?

    I really prefer to have the old-fashioned bathroom where everything is in one room and there is a door between the bedroom and bathroom.

    Is there a reason for the change to the open concept, and what are the benefits of this "open bedroom/bathroom" setup?

    Where does everyone else stand on this issue?


    Open master bath has been around for the last 30 years. My house was built in the early 80s and it has no door between the bedroom & bathroom. However, there is a door for the toilet and shower room. I personally prefer a toilet room w/ a door. It allow one spouse to use the toilet while the other use the sink or the shower. I doubt most people would want to see/hear/smell their partner while they're dropping a big one.

    Submitted by moneymaker on January 21, 2011 - 9:11am.

    I do wish we had a bigger tub. When we were looking I was always excited to see a jetted tub, now I realize it is just a place to breed bacteria so I'm glad we don't actually have one, a 6 foot tub would be nice though.

    Submitted by sdrealtor on January 21, 2011 - 9:18am.

    FWIW you can buy a heater for a jetted tub to keep the water hot. Not sure of the cost though.

    Submitted by MANmom on January 21, 2011 - 9:19am.

    We just moved in to this house in August, it has a jacuzzi tub, haven't used it yet. In regard to having a bathroom door, that is one of the reasons we bought this house! My husband is an airline pilot, he comes in and leaves at very odd hours, when he has an early flight or comes in very late, I don't have to hear him showering or brushing his teeth. I am big on bathroom doors!

    Submitted by Scarlett on January 21, 2011 - 9:38am.

    MANmom wrote:
    I am big on bathroom doors

    Me too, but it seems to be missing from practically all the newer construction - which boggles my mind as of why? Esp. in the master bedroom where you are supposed to have TWO people. It's soooo annoying like at night or if you want to sleep later than the other in the morning. For the sake of "open floorplan" the builders have sacrificed a lot of practicality....That a big peeve of mine.

    Submitted by CDMA ENG on January 21, 2011 - 9:49am.

    The only time I use the tub is when I have the flu. Influenza that is NOT Fat Lazy Union worker...

    The bath really help with the muscle aches.

    Other than that...

    Never.

    As for the open bed/bath concept I like it in the regards that it gets more air and there is more area. My wife likes to take really HOT and really LONG showers and it drive me nuts when I find the walls dripping with condensation. We live in an older home with a "normal" size bath.

    CE

    Submitted by LAAFTERHOURS on January 21, 2011 - 10:15am.

    We have a bubbler spa tub. Wife uses it twice a week at least. I dont use it bc im too long for it.

    Submitted by Diego Mamani on January 21, 2011 - 10:42am.

    temeculaguy wrote:
    I'm with you CA renter

    Me too! It's one of those silly design things that may look "cute" on paper but are absolutely nonpractical. Architects need to know that we hate open bathrooms!

    This reminds me of the current trend in dress shirts (for men): many have no pocket! That's another ridiculous trend that designers think it's "cute." I need that pocket to put in business cards, or a credit card/DL that I need to keep handy, or a pen, etc. Manly men need all the pockets we can have!

    Submitted by justme on January 21, 2011 - 10:58am.

    I never understood all the new McMansions of 2000-2010 that all have the "e*hibitionist" bathroom with huge tubs and large windows.

    Give me a good shower cabinet any day.

    Another example of bad design is when there is a shower over tub and NO enclosure, just a shower curtain. It is quite the recipe for water spills and damage around the edges.

    Addendum: The word e*hibionist triggers the Spam filter and will not let me post unless I replace the X with a *.

    Imagine that, a real-estate discussion board that cannot discuss e*hibitionists. There is so much of that in real estate marketing that we ought to be able to talk about it without getting censored :-) :-)

    Submitted by treehugger on January 21, 2011 - 2:06pm.

    Quite agree with the open concept, find it bizarre. We bought blackout curtains and put up, look quite nice and work well. Eventually we will put in a door.

    Love my bubble jet tub, but do have the issue with keeping the water warm, we have just lived in the house 6 months and I need to research a tub heater. I love it anyway, being athletic I find it feels fabulously uplifting after a long run. I have to fight with the hubby and kids to stay out of it! I now use it as a "special" reward for them.....bribery.

    Submitted by NotCranky on January 21, 2011 - 2:56pm.

    My house has a great design for the master bath situation.We have a full bathroom and another 1/2 bath that is a "pass through" to a hallway that serves the great room and family room.The master bedroom has another door, where you would typically find it, that goes to the regular hallway that goes to the rest of the bedrooms and also back to the community areas. I was skeptical at first, but it really works well. It's a short trip to anywhere in the house.