Weight gain and age

User Forum Topic
Submitted by moneymaker on May 2, 2016 - 7:49pm

Used to brag that my weight was the same as my drivers license, gained 15 lbs. after getting married. Now I'm about 10 lbs. over the license weight. So gotta do something about it. When I get home after working a somewhat laborious job just don't want to do the gym or exercise. So seems like the only time I want to work out is on my off days and there just aren't enough of those. Would a fit bit help? Anybody find a fun way to get exercise after work? Team sports seem to be a lot of standing around so I'm more of an independent athlete. To lose 25 lbs. that's about 100K Calories gotta burn.

Submitted by Balboa on May 2, 2016 - 8:11pm.

Not completely on point, but this was an interesting article in the NYT today: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/02/health...

Kettle bells seem all the rage, though form is key. My husband plays badminton. A couple of my friends love boxing. I feel like those things have the added bonus of requiring us to learn something new. We all know generally what running is like and whether we want to do several hours of it a week.

I've given up trying to workout after work. My workday spans at least 9 hours and my commute home is 45-55 minutes and is so stultifying (punctuated by moments of sheer terror, as the saying goes) that I have no momentum after it. I just started seeing a personal trainer last month and do it on my lunch hour. I do intervals on the treadmill at the office gym once a week and usually one weekend workout. I work a desk job -- I doubt I'd want to use a break from manual labor to run on a tread mill (which is terribly boring on top of everything else).

Submitted by moneymaker on May 2, 2016 - 9:09pm.

Speaking of terrifying drives home, today I saw a drunk driver driving a Ford with Oregon plates, then not more than 5 minutes later saw a wheel fall off a trailer right in front of me on the 805 north, wheel kept right on going down the freeway I passed both the drunk and the wheel while keeping a close eye on both.

Submitted by Coronita on May 2, 2016 - 9:17pm.

Since last August (when I switched my employer), I've focusing more time to taking care of my health, and initially it was not easy to motivate after being more or less idle for the prior 12-14 years. Today, I run about 3 miles each day, and do about 1/2 hours weights every other day at home. I'v never exercised as much as I do today, even when as far back as high school.

It hasn't been easy to get into this routine, particularly in the first 2-3 months. Part of what helped was peer pressure at work, being surrounded by many late 20ies to early 30ies that are extremely fit and active. I won't give you advice on what you should do, but I'll tell you what I did. I threw money at the problem for the first 2-3 months and got myself a personal trainer 2-3 times a week for the first two months, so that she would kick the crap out of me and make me stick to a routine, no matter how busy I said I was. Also,, spending good money on it, I took it more serious. After about 2 months, I got into my routine, and I haven' looked back.

My goal was not weight loss, but to build up my cardio, to be able to run a reasonable distance, and to get toned up. Weight loss was a side benefit. I'm about 25 lbs less than I was in August of last year, and most of my pants are way too big now, and I had to change some of my belts because they were too big. I'm wearig pants back when I had them since my college freshman year.

I found out that once I started to get into this routine, surprisingly I felt less hungry, and don't eat as much. Diet is a very important thing. I wouldn't do a crash diet since those don't work. But you should consider eating healthier, and eatting less for dinner (for example).

No soda, no beer, no cakes, no sugar, no high carb foods.

I haven't had any problems maintaining my weight. My biggest problem is i trying to undo years of neglect around my abdomen.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on May 2, 2016 - 10:30pm.

Moneymaker, not sure what your diet is like.... But the answer for most Americans is to change your diet. Learn to like and appreciate lighter food. no burgers or mash potato with butter, etc...
I think that what people find delicious is all in the head.

Submitted by spdrun on May 2, 2016 - 11:00pm.

Commute by bike if possible. Or swim.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on May 2, 2016 - 11:15pm.

spdrun wrote:
Commute by bike if possible. Or swim.

Good idea... But the question was weight gain with age. If exercise doesn't become forever part of lifestyle, then weight will come back. The other part of the equation is diet.

Become a food elitist. Very few things should be good enough to be called "soooo goooood." Only the top 10% in quality should deserve your desire.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on May 3, 2016 - 6:09am.

cliches like "it's impossible to outrun the fork" and 'abs are made int he kitchen" might be true. moving about it great for a lot of reasons, including gum health, but ultimately, it is so easy to eat the extra calories in literally seconds you may've used hours to burn...

also, the whole machine seems to slow down a bit.

Submitted by XBoxBoy on May 3, 2016 - 6:49am.

It's probably worth noting that there is very little if any evidence that working out leads to weight loss.

http://www.vox.com/2016/4/28/11518804/we...

Submitted by no_such_reality on May 3, 2016 - 6:51am.

what age are you guys talking about?

What nature is pounding into my head is that with age , what's on the fork has an exponential impact.

The amount of effort required to lose a pound of flab AFAICT looks like the insurance premium chart by age.

If you got a long stultifying commute, long hour grind job, or otherwise unhealthy job environment, get a new job. IMO, out company environment are our biggest killers.

Reminds me of something I herd some talking head say years ago, look around the restaurant you're about to eat in, the store you're buying at, the choices your making re the same s them, you'll look like they are.

Submitted by ocrenter on May 3, 2016 - 7:32am.

Balboa wrote:
Not completely on point, but this was an interesting article in the NYT today: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/02/health...

Kettle bells seem all the rage, though form is key. My husband plays badminton. A couple of my friends love boxing. I feel like those things have the added bonus of requiring us to learn something new. We all know generally what running is like and whether we want to do several hours of it a week.

I've given up trying to workout after work. My workday spans at least 9 hours and my commute home is 45-55 minutes and is so stultifying (punctuated by moments of sheer terror, as the saying goes) that I have no momentum after it. I just started seeing a personal trainer last month and do it on my lunch hour. I do intervals on the treadmill at the office gym once a week and usually one weekend workout. I work a desk job -- I doubt I'd want to use a break from manual labor to run on a tread mill (which is terribly boring on top of everything else).

The article is proof that the diet industry and the fitness industry are creating endless cycles of failures that ultimately leads to completely broken self esteem and self worth as well as an ultra slow metabolism.

Submitted by spdrun on May 3, 2016 - 7:35am.

What about cocaine or nicotine? Seriously.

Submitted by ocrenter on May 3, 2016 - 7:37am.

flu wrote:
Since last August (when I switched my employer), I've focusing more time to taking care of my health, and initially it was not easy to motivate after being more or less idle for the prior 12-14 years. Today, I run about 3 miles each day, and do about 1/2 hours weights every other day at home. I'v never exercised as much as I do today, even when as far back as high school.

It hasn't been easy to get into this routine, particularly in the first 2-3 months. Part of what helped was peer pressure at work, being surrounded by many late 20ies to early 30ies that are extremely fit and active. I won't give you advice on what you should do, but I'll tell you what I did. I threw money at the problem for the first 2-3 months and got myself a personal trainer 2-3 times a week for the first two months, so that she would kick the crap out of me and make me stick to a routine, no matter how busy I said I was. Also,, spending good money on it, I took it more serious. After about 2 months, I got into my routine, and I haven' looked back.

My goal was not weight loss, but to build up my cardio, to be able to run a reasonable distance, and to get toned up. Weight loss was a side benefit. I'm about 25 lbs less than I was in August of last year, and most of my pants are way too big now, and I had to change some of my belts because they were too big. I'm wearig pants back when I had them since my college freshman year.

I found out that once I started to get into this routine, surprisingly I felt less hungry, and don't eat as much. Diet is a very important thing. I wouldn't do a crash diet since those don't work. But you should consider eating healthier, and eatting less for dinner (for example).

No soda, no beer, no cakes, no sugar, no high carb foods.

I haven't had any problems maintaining my weight. My biggest problem is i trying to undo years of neglect around my abdomen.

+1

Most people don't realize how stressful it is to sit all day. The stress hormone built up then leads to excess cravings. This is why most people crave the junk food at night time. Daily exercise counters the stress hormone build up and leads to reduced intake, and hence the weight loss.

Great job, FLU!

Submitted by ocrenter on May 3, 2016 - 7:40am.

XBoxBoy wrote:
It's probably worth noting that there is very little if any evidence that working out leads to weight loss.

http://www.vox.com/2016/4/28/11518804/weight-loss-exercise-myth-burn-calories

Excessive work out is actually stress inducing, which leads to more cravings and hunger.

Modest exercise on daily basis yields the best.

Somebody said something about the middle path under a tree a few thousand years ago, we keep getting back to that...

Submitted by Coronita on May 3, 2016 - 8:04am.

Weight loss also has huge benefits to your joints and feet. I use to have really bad joint and feet pain. Now it's gone. Not carrying around an extra 25 lbs helps a lot.

Start small and aim for small goals you know you can stick to. If you don't have the discipline to do it yourself, find someone that will hold you accountable to it, just like any other project.

You'll be happy you did. I am so cheap I had to drill new holes in my old belts that I refuse to give up.

Submitted by ocrenter on May 3, 2016 - 8:25am.

flu wrote:
Weight loss also has huge benefits to your joints and feet. I use to have really bad joint and feet pain. Now it's gone. Not carrying around an extra 25 lbs helps a lot.

Start small and aim for small goals you know you can stick to. If you don't have the discipline to do it yourself, find someone that will hold you accountable to it, just like any other project.

You'll be happy you did. I am so cheap I had to drill new holes in my old belts that I refuse to give up.

1 lb of weight loss remove 4 lbs of pressure on your knees.

hey, there's nothing wrong with drilling new holes in old belts, as long as you are drilling holes in the right direction!

Submitted by FlyerInHi on May 3, 2016 - 9:34am.

Free will. A lot of people are driven to make money, as I'm sure moneymaker is. Eating well and exercising is so much easier as that only involves oneself.

Today, for exercise, I'm chiseling off the bathroom tiles of a condo I bought. Exercise and money making all together.

Submitted by bearishgurl on May 3, 2016 - 10:09am.

XBoxBoy wrote:
It's probably worth noting that there is very little if any evidence that working out leads to weight loss.

http://www.vox.com/2016/4/28/11518804/we...

The thing is .... cardio and weight-bearing exercise turns fat into muscle. The more muscle you have in your body, the higher your metabolism.

Second to running 5-6x per week, I still think Body Pump 3-4x per week is a great way to build muscle and overall fitness. Especially if you have knee issues from running in your younger days. The classes are only one hour:

http://www.lesmills.com/us/workouts/fitn...

edit: I wear knee supports under my clothes for this class.

Submitted by bearishgurl on May 3, 2016 - 10:40am.

FlyerInHi wrote:
spdrun wrote:
Commute by bike if possible. Or swim.

Good idea... But the question was weight gain with age. If exercise doesn't become forever part of lifestyle, then weight will come back. The other part of the equation is diet.

Become a food elitist. Very few things should be good enough to be called "soooo goooood." Only the top 10% in quality should deserve your desire.

Agree with all of this (incl spdrun's suggestions) except that not everyone can become a "food elitist." I'm supporting my youngest kid thru college right now (room and board) and cannot afford to buy expensive halibut, salmon and organic vegetables. However, I do my best to shop Vons Just4U and the sales to pick up the stuff I need when it is on sale.

I have never and will never pay anywhere near "full price" for anything in a grocery store .... ever. Even if I need groceries for a holiday BBQ or potluck I'm going to or inviting people over for, I shop way in advance little by little to get whatever I need at a rock bottom prices for the event. When I walk into a grocery store, I pick up only the "specials" on my list and leave. Nothing is so important that it can't wait for a trip to another store (which has it on special) or another week ... when it is on special. For milk, bread and eggs, I get them at Grocery Outlet, unless they are on special at a mainstream grocery store which I already have a list for. It is rare to beat Grocery Outlet's prices for everyday staples, including common produce.

My plan only works if you are surrounded by stores within a 3-mile radius and I am. And you need to go on your computer or smartphone every Wednesday and create a list of "specials" to buy. I print mine out cuz I don't have a smartphone.

As an aside, I also pack non-perishable groceries in my trunk that I will end up having to find somewhere else on my road trips, including toiletries which are expensive on the road (such as backups of a certain eye drop, allergy med, insect repellent or cold medicine, etc). I frequently find myself in rural areas where there is little choice in groceries to buy and little competition, making the prices much higher than home ... that is, IF you can find the item at all. And Von's rules state that Just4U discounts only work in your region (in my case, SD County). However, I loaded my card from my home computer and then drove to CO last year (over 1100 miles away) and found that a couple of the things I bought which I had loaded on my card as J4U discounts took in a Safeway just outside of Boulder when I punched in my phone number! Not sure if it will work in all states with Safeway stores but this is just an FYI.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on May 3, 2016 - 11:12am.

bearishgurl wrote:

The thing is .... cardio and weight-bearing exercise turns fat into muscle. The more muscle you have in your body, the higher your metabolism.

Technically, muscles grow and fat cells shrink. It was a figure of speech but my friend reminds me of the slip up frequently. The guy is fat but thinks of himself as a stud. He's an engineering major from a top school and likes to point out that I'm talking out of my ass. Needless to say, everything he does concerning weight and health is wrong, hence the lack of results. But, hey, he likes to remind me he's the better "scientist."

People who want data should get some mice and experiment for themselves. Built a little weight control laboratory at home.

Submitted by NotCranky on May 3, 2016 - 11:11am.

Eating like some hinterlands peasant is better but who is going to do that?

Anyway, MM, you say you have a physical job, so if that is not keeping your weight down it probably is sleep and nutrition to a large degree.

I like exercise though. If the labor part of your job is low level but consistent I would go for a few intense workouts of some kind per week, definitely stay away from the adult softball league, basket ball yes, if you want to be social. Go for things known to change body composition , hill running , sprinting( actual running or substitute a bike or eliptical), jumprope, weights. You don't want to do long slow things that just add fatigue to your life.

If you actually do heavy work then it's probably your diet.

Problem with exercise is that it has a tendency for us to remove activity from the rest of our day. Work out hard then be fatigued and sit around the computer and in proximity of the fridge instead of going out and washing the car, for instance. Stealthy, we can remove a lot of calorie burning activities over the course of time because of exercising. I personally have never had a good exercise routine and gained weight though, only when I got real inconsistent or cut back overall activity a lot.

I don't have a perfect diet, i binge on average a couple of times a month, sweets. I eat a lot of good stuff though, I think I have my macros figured our more or less for me. I don't eat much of the worst stuff other than your regular desert item here and there, or drink non-nutritive beverages much, sodas, or alcohol.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on May 3, 2016 - 11:08am.

BG, by "food elitist" I don't mean eating only the most expensive stuff, just like an ivory tower elitist is not a multi-millionaire dollar wise, but he's an elitist of the mind.

Choose broccoli over mash, fresh apple over apple sauce. Ban processed big food from your diet. Processed should be artisanal or home made. My teenage nieces are becoming little brat elitists. They take pride in their choices.

BTW, I buy things in season and on sale too. I like Asian markets because they have such variety. HMart and Zions in San Diego always have weekly sales.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on May 3, 2016 - 11:36am.

Blogstar wrote:

I don't have a perfect diet, i binge on average a couple of times a month, sweets. I eat a lot of good stuff though, I think I have my macros figured our more or less for me. I don't eat much of the worst stuff other than your regular desert item here and there, or drink non-nutritive beverages much, sodas, or alcohol.

Food cravings is cultural. Many cultures don't like sweets like cakes. My friends from Hong Kong, Vietnam, Thailand (the tropics where there are delicious fruits) prefer eating mango, durian, lychees.... over a chocolate lava cake for desert.

Tropical Latin America is different because of the heavy western food from Portugal and Spain.

Japanese cakes/pastries are unsweet and light compared to American cakes. There is Japanese bakery on Convoy. Real Japanese sushi does not use the heavy mayonnaise type sauce that Americans like. When the food is natural you can taste the quality of the ingredient and the skill in preparation better.

So it helps to be an internationalist elitist (I'm reclaiming the word) and study different cultures. Adapt what is best as your own. That's what we as Americans do best.

Submitted by bearishgurl on May 3, 2016 - 11:46am.

FlyerInHi wrote:
BG, by "food elitist" I don't mean eating only the most expensive stuff, just like an ivory tower elitist is not a multi-millionaire dollar wise, but he's an elitist of the mind.

Choose broccoli over mash, fresh apple over apple sauce. Ban processed big food from your diet. Processed should be artisanal or home made. My teenage nieces are becoming little brat elitists. They take pride in their choices.

BTW, I buy things in season and on sale too. I like Asian markets because they have such variety. HMart and Zions in San Diego always have weekly sales.

Oh, I agree that starch and saturated fats should be eliminated from your diet. Even sour cream and cottage cheese come in a "fat free" version and they taste fine to me. An unblemished, fresh bag of granny smith apples from WA is only $2.99 at Grocery Outlet (used to be $1.99).

Well, I'm not close to one of those large Asian markets but instead a few smaller ones. We do have a Sprouts (cheap veggies, but their bulk and packaged grain, nut and seed prices are higher than Ralph's). There is a Trader Joe's out in Eastlake but I don't think their prices are that great cuz I don't buy the type of ready-made food (i.e. stuffed salmon, etc) like they sell. And unless a "club priced" item in a local grocery chain is currently featured on a "buy 3, 4 or 5, mix or match" (red tag) promotion, I have found the club price to be too high, unless I have a paper mfr coupon or J4U coupon on my card to use for the same "club-priced" item.

I guess I'm "cheap" cuz I shopped at the military commissary for 35 years (and I still visit it 2-3 x per year when my kid gets me in). I still compare every single price on the outside to the commissary :=0

I don't buy processed food except I keep boxes of 100-calorie MW popcorn available for when I get a "Red Box" movie and have friends over (or they bring over a movie to watch). My dog LOVES baby carrots cut up small and the 94-cent J4U bag of 3-color coleslaw! She always wants to "snack" and must keep up her girlish figure!

When I get up to my usual haunt at Kearny Mesa this summer, I'll have my personalized-just-4-MY-house paint color professionally mixed at Glidden and check out the newer huge 99-Ranch Market across the street on CM Blvd (used to be a K-mart) and see what they carry.

Submitted by NotCranky on May 3, 2016 - 11:49am.

FlyerInHi wrote:
Blogstar wrote:

I don't have a perfect diet, i binge on average a couple of times a month, sweets. I eat a lot of good stuff though, I think I have my macros figured our more or less for me. I don't eat much of the worst stuff other than your regular desert item here and there, or drink non-nutritive beverages much, sodas, or alcohol.

Food cravings is cultural. Many cultures don't like sweets like cakes. My friends from Hong Kong, Vietnam, Thailand (the tropics where there are delicious fruits) prefer eating mango, durian, lychees.... over a chocolate lava cake for desert.

Tropical Latin America is different because of the heavy western food from Portugal and Spain.

Japanese cakes/pastries are unsweet and light compared to American cakes. There is Japanese bakery on Convoy. Real Japanese sushi does not use the heavy mayonnaise type sauce that Americans like. When the food is natural you can taste the quality of the ingredient and the skill in preparation better.

So it helps to be an internationalist elitist (I'm reclaiming the word) and study different cultures. Adapt what is best as your own. That's what we as Americans do best.

You are internationally full of yourself! Missed the point. It works pretty good for me! You are blinded by your elitism if you don't see moderation as being as possible in US terms as in Asian or any other cultural terms. That we have more bad available may or may not be something to argue. Doesn't matter if you don't use too much of it.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on May 3, 2016 - 12:15pm.

My point is that you can learn to like or not like some food. Once you learn, a whole new world opens. Liking and eating American sweets is ok in moderation, sure. But learning to appreciate and like alternatives is better, especially if you discover new ingredients, superior quality and preparation. You don't know if you're not open to trying.

Don't take it personally. Some people are too stuck with "I am what I am and it works for me."

I'm lucky that i grew up traveling so it's a lot easier for me.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on May 3, 2016 - 12:25pm.

BG, I'm not "elitist" in that I only eat expensive organic food of the best quality (I would if I were a millionaire and had a personal chef). I'm about to stop by the Thai restaurant to have mixed veggies with salmon (OMG farmed raised because they don't serve fresh caught).

Submitted by NotCranky on May 3, 2016 - 12:29pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:
My point is that you can learn to like or not like some food. Once you learn, a whole new world opens. Liking and eating American sweets is ok in moderation, sure. But learning to appreciate and like alternatives is better, especially is you discover superior quality and preparation.

Don't take it personally. Some people are too stuck with "I am what I am and it works for me."

I'm lucky that i grew up traveling so it's a lot easier for me.

I am not taking is personally , I am laughing at your elitism, you know the one that sets you apart from the rest! Am I stuck if it actually works pretty well as shown in my vitals and physical capabilities ? You think you are the only inquisitive person on the planet? For goodness sakes, get a grip man. Where is the actual proof of your superiority? Gold medals from the Olympics? Nobel peace prizes? You are a average joe with a tendency to shame and attempt to one up what is not to your tastes, especially if it is "american". That's it.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on May 3, 2016 - 12:34pm.

I can assure you this...if you have fish head stew for dinner, and just salads for lunch, even if you eat all u want, you won't overeat. You'll just stop. There's only so much fish head soup a man can eat, even when famished. Portion control through aesthetics.

Submitted by NotCranky on May 3, 2016 - 12:44pm.

OMG the dates I have are Tunisian, I am more special than I thought.

Submitted by NotCranky on May 3, 2016 - 1:28pm.

G-d was not thinking of elitism when she put, cucurbits in Africa, Plantains in the tropics, or alliums in the North.

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