Sunny San Diego

User Forum Topic
Submitted by FlyerInHi on January 23, 2016 - 11:50am

I'm going to crow this morning and say that I'm happy to live in Sunny San Diego.

Screw all the snow and inclement weather. An occasional earthquake is a good tradeoff. Plus in dry sunny areas, we don't need to spend all the money to maintain our houses and replace our cars.

Submitted by spdrun on January 23, 2016 - 12:21pm.

I'm about to put on x-c skis and hit up the park. Not minding it one bit.

I love me a climate with real seasons.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on January 23, 2016 - 12:34pm.

Snow clearing over the years;
http://nyti.ms/1lFqDc0

Seems stupid and self induced pain when you can vote with your feet and get away.

If you have enough money, it's a non issue. But why would you want to live in a house and deal with that crap every year?
I could live in a NY apartment. At least you're not out there shoveling snow. Seems like a useless endeavor, like a rat spinning wheels every year -- shoveling snow, sweeping leaves, cutting branches, clearing gutters and ditches, mowing acres of lawn, etc... If I have to do labor, I'd rather remodel condos and see income producing tangible results.

Submitted by mixxalot on January 23, 2016 - 1:19pm.

No doubt last night I enjoyed a pitcher of Chronic beer and delicious pizza at Pizza Port outside in OB and enjoyed the nice weather and laughed at folks stuck in east coast blizzard.

Submitted by bearishgurl on January 23, 2016 - 1:36pm.

spdrun wrote:
I'm about to put on x-c skis and hit up the park. Not minding it one bit.

I love me a climate with real seasons.

More pics, puleeze :-)

Submitted by bearishgurl on January 23, 2016 - 1:49pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:
Snow clearing over the years;
http://nyti.ms/1lFqDc0

Seems stupid and self induced pain when you can vote with your feet and get away.

If you have enough money, it's a non issue. But why would you want to live in a house and deal with that crap every year?
I could live in a NY apartment. At least you're not out there shoveling snow. Seems like a useless endeavor, like a rat spinning wheels every year -- shoveling snow, sweeping leaves, cutting branches, clearing gutters and ditches, mowing acres of lawn, etc... If I have to do labor, I'd rather remodel condos and see income producing tangible results.

I agree with you to a point, FIH. I'm still considering South Lake Tahoe for a retirement locale. "Senior citizen" ski season passes and free buses to Heavenly 3-4 months per year appeal to me. For the most part, their winter is fairly mild and it is very beautiful up there and also very well-preserved (on the CA side).

It's expensive and a hassle to drive all the way up there once or twice per season and stay in hotels or timeshares, not knowing what the actual ski conditions will be during your stay. Since their weather (and ski conditions) can be unpredictable from day to day and even hour to hour, I would just like to have a cheap season pass (purchased the prior summer) that I can use to ski for a couple/few hours at a time as time (and conditions) permit. I'd need to live there to do that as staying in lodging is cost-prohibitive.

In spite of having to shovel snow a few times per year, I feel living in a reasonably-priced resort town such as SLT would be the ideal life for me.

It's also big enough to have its own hospital and for me to find a part-time gig if I should want/need one.

This wouldn't work in the CO resort towns or even Mammoth Mtn as housing is too expensive for me in those locales and I would also likely be forced into a small condo and/or having to scare up paying roommates to survive. That isn't my idea of a peaceful, economical retirement.

Submitted by bearishgurl on January 23, 2016 - 2:07pm.

Oh, and SD has its own challenges for the homeowner set, i.e. constant (expensive) vigilance against both drywood and subterranean termites, stubborn hard-water stains, rust and wayward vegetation including constantly seeding queen palms, wild overgrown bird of paradise, encroaching elephant ear, virulent native bermudagrass up to 2 feet long and stickery bougainvillea messes blowing in the wind all year round, etc.

I could go on ... and on. Better to have 35' knives, a Sawzall and all manner of garden tools at your disposal and USE them ... regularly. I've owned several homes in SD and lawn and gardening maintenance is tedious, repetitive and back straining work, which never lets up. Short of chopping everything down and stump removal for a "sterile looking" unattractive lot, there is always work to do.

I've never had one but can tell you that gardeners do earn their money.

To the tourist, all those large-lot stately homes surrounding the Hotel Del Coronado and beachfront have gorgeous landscaping that looks effortless. Little do they know how many hours per week hired gardeners spend on the premises :=0

Submitted by spdrun on January 23, 2016 - 3:30pm.

FiH -- every year, we get maybe 1-2 storms above 8 inches. It's usually much less. If you don't want to shovel, pay someone else to do it.

And buy a house with a small front yard/driveway so you don't have much surface area to shovel. Huge front yards are generally a waste of time/money since you have to keep them looking nice.

Submitted by paramount on January 23, 2016 - 4:38pm.

spdrun wrote:
Not minding it one bit.

I love me a climate with real seasons.

I agree -> So Cal is overrated for weather IMO.

SD weather = Booorrring!

Submitted by FlyerInHi on January 23, 2016 - 5:35pm.

I agree with you in many ways spdrun. Sometimes you just have to let nature be and deal with it. I'm just talking about how people live in general.

People in nice neighborhoods want their walkways and driveways shoveled nicely. I would just let the snow pile up because it will melt anyway. Just drive over it in a 4x4. Why bother? But if you live in certain areas, you have to conform otherwise you become the outcast of the street.

In east coast suburbia, people have large lots (for sure compared to San Diego). All I see is maintenance.

BG, if you have a nice courtyard as a yard, you don't need to do much landscaping in SD. But you have the initial investment of improvement. Think a Moroccan riad,
Spanish/Mexican courtyard, or modern courtyard with hardscape.

The idea of a prairie or tropical home with grass in SD is anachronistic and contradictory to the environment. Santa Luz has the idea of appropriate landscaping, imo.

Submitted by spdrun on January 23, 2016 - 5:55pm.

FIH -- lot size depends on where. There are a lot of older towns where houses have tiny front yards and bigger back yards. Which is great for privacy.

This is a really attractive beach town, but plenty of that type of thing in other places. Off-street parking comes from back alleys rather than from the street.

Submitted by paramount on January 23, 2016 - 6:33pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:

The idea of a prairie or tropical home with grass in SD is anachronistic and contradictory to the environment. Santa Luz has the idea of appropriate landscaping, imo.

Humans have changed and shaped their environment for thousands of years and will continue to do so.

Most want real green grass for lawns; not rocks or carpet.

Submitted by bearishgurl on January 23, 2016 - 7:10pm.

Those native elephant ear rhizomes in SD are bigger than a football and at least 14" deep with lo-o-o-ng roots that resemble seaweed .... in Humboldt County, lol ....

Do ya'll realize they can grow under a solid block wall from a neighboring property?

Try digging one out and see how far that gets you.

Submitted by XBoxBoy on January 23, 2016 - 7:24pm.

To some degree I agree. Life in San Diego is pretty nice. But a friend of mine who lives outside of Washington DC on a couple acres sent me a video of him and his hound playing in 30" of snow today. I'm deeply jealous. To be bundled up, off for a romp in the snow with a big hound... now that's the life for me.

Submitted by bearishgurl on January 23, 2016 - 7:31pm.

I'm constantly battling with my yard in sunny SD. In a previous life, I had a 110-foot raised bed of so-called "prize" floribunda roses. They cost more to maintain per month than my own individual food bill. And I didn't even own any stock in the Scotts Company but probably should have:

http://www.ortho.com/smg/gosite//home

I used to don heavy rubber gloves while still in my swimsuit and turn on the floodlights in the dark to spend my token hour-plus cutting them back about once per month. Since I was gone and under fluorescent light in an office or commuting 9.5 - 10 hours per day, 5 days a week, I really never got to enjoy them much in the daylight. The time I spent feeding them, cutting them back and exterminating them far exceeded the time it took me to properly care for my three cats!

Such is the price of living in a SFR in SD sans (expensive) gardener.

Shoveling snow a few times per year (hopefully just the walks) while getting a few months reprieve from "gardening duty" seems like a fair tradeoff for "snow-clime dwellers."

Submitted by bearishgurl on January 23, 2016 - 7:44pm.

XBoxBoy wrote:
To some degree I agree. Life in San Diego is pretty nice. But a friend of mine who lives outside of Washington DC on a couple acres sent me a video of him and his hound playing in 30" of snow today. I'm deeply jealous. To be bundled up, off for a romp in the snow with a big hound... now that's the life for me.
Yeah, those eastern seaboard suburban and exurban neighborhoods have really nice lots. Homeowners typically use tractor mowers there and often there is no fencing (except possibly a minimal split rail) between lots.

I do believe it's a really amazing locale to raise kids (and big dogs) in .... probably the best in the country. Especially in Montgomery and Frederick County, MD and Fairfax and Loudoun County, VA.

"Bucolic" is the only word I can think of which describes this region adequately.

Submitted by spdrun on January 23, 2016 - 7:50pm.

The counties that you describe actually have TOO big lots outside of a few towns. Annoying to maintain. There are towns outside of NY and Philly that have much more "manageable sized" housing. Generally spread out enough to have green space, but dense enough so kids can walk to school.

Submitted by La Jolla Renter on January 23, 2016 - 8:09pm.

I grew up in Northern Virginia, yeah, those 4 seasons were great... ice, rain, pollen, and humidity.

The surf was 5-7ft today. ... I rest my case.

Submitted by bearishgurl on January 23, 2016 - 8:13pm.

spdrun wrote:
The counties that you describe actually have TOO big lots outside of a few towns. Annoying to maintain. There are towns outside of NY and Philly that have much more "manageable sized" housing. Generally spread out enough to have green space, but dense enough so kids can walk to school.
Yes, you are correct, spdrun. The kids in these MD and VA towns are typically bused to school with their stop situated on a two-lane country road. That is ... unless they live in the town the school is located in. This applies to high schools and often middle schools as well. It's still an awesome micro-region to raise kids in, IMHO. Fairfax County, VA (Great Falls) tends to be the most expensive out of the four, with Montgomery County, MD (Chevy Chase) coming in at a close second. (Those are the two closest-in counties to Washington DC.) I've never been north of Baltimore but I believe you that it's more walkable up there.

Submitted by bearishgurl on January 23, 2016 - 8:23pm.

La Jolla Renter wrote:
I grew up in Northern Virginia, yeah, those 4 seasons were great... ice, rain, pollen, and humidity.

The surf was 5-7ft today. ... I rest my case.

Well, La Jolla Renter, you must have gotten a great K-12 public education. If you attended public school there, good for you.

Submitted by paramount on January 23, 2016 - 8:30pm.

bearishgurl wrote:

I do believe it's a really amazing locale to raise kids (and big dogs) in .... probably the best in the country. Especially in Montgomery and Frederick County, MD and Fairfax and Loudoun County, VA.

"Bucolic" is the only word I can think of which describes this region adequately.

I owned a house/property in Frederick County and lived there for a number of years. I lived in a subdivision, but my nearest neighbor was about 100 feet to my left and right.

Submitted by bearishgurl on January 23, 2016 - 8:35pm.

paramount wrote:
bearishgurl wrote:

I do believe it's a really amazing locale to raise kids (and big dogs) in .... probably the best in the country. Especially in Montgomery and Frederick County, MD and Fairfax and Loudoun County, VA.

"Bucolic" is the only word I can think of which describes this region adequately.

I owned a house/property in Frederick County and lived there for a number of years. I lived in a subdivision, but my nearest neighbor was about 100 feet to my left and right.

I know. Isn't it awesome? You should have stayed with your gov-contractor employer there. It's hands-down a better place to raise kids in than any city/county in SoCal. Period.

Submitted by bearishgurl on January 23, 2016 - 8:42pm.

For instance ... among others:

http://www.greatschools.org/maryland/ija...

They're among the best public HS's in the nation, IMO.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on January 23, 2016 - 11:54pm.

bearishgurl wrote:
I'm constantly battling with my yard in sunny SD. In a previous life, I had a 110-foot raised bed of so-called "prize" floribunda roses. They cost more to maintain per month than my own individual food bill. And I didn't even own any stock in the Scotts Company but probably should have:

http://www.ortho.com/smg/gosite//home

I used to don heavy rubber gloves while still in my swimsuit and turn on the floodlights in the dark to spend my token hour-plus cutting them back about once per month. Since I was gone and under fluorescent light in an office or commuting 9.5 - 10 hours per day, 5 days a week, I really never got to enjoy them much in the daylight. The time I spent feeding them, cutting them back and exterminating them far exceeded the time it took me to properly care for my three cats!

Such is the price of living in a SFR in SD sans (expensive) gardener.

Shoveling snow a few times per year (hopefully just the walks) while getting a few months reprieve from "gardening duty" seems like a fair tradeoff for "snow-clime dwellers."

You shouldn't have roses in San Diego.
My parents have a hardscape patio which I designed. They have an outdoor shower and a dog bath area with hot water as well as built in planter areas and large pots. The "outdoor living room" is surrounded by a low wall to separate it from the rest of the lot which is natural native vegetation. It has an outdoor kitchen, a large covered area for seating and lounging (important that furniture is not exposed to direct sunlight unless you want it there for a little bit, and dew and rain). It looks good and it's low maintenance. Looks like the private terrace of a nice resort suite. Anything beyond that is just raw, arrid, natural San Diego. People who insist on planting every inch of their lot, and having furniture under the elements are self-inducing maintenance issues. They are asking for it, so they should not bitch when they have to do work, or pay for it.

Raw natural San Diego is beautiful if you do it right. Some of prairie homes with grass mixed with tropical palms in Coronado are ok -- just not climate appropriate. They are just transplanting east coast/Florida concepts to San Diego.

BTW, Kahala, the La jolla of honolulu is dry like San Diego. It should not have tropical landscaping like the wet areas of the island. But rich people insist and they pay $1000 or more per month in water bills to have their tropical lots. Self-induced complications and expenses.

I heard that there's a movement in some areas of the country to just let the grass grow wild and not mow the lawn. I believe in proper design to incorporate natural elements into the landscape. In the past, rich people and even the middle class had servants and gardeners. Now we live differently so we don't need carry on with the old concepts from 100 years ago. But I know, old habits are hard to break. Today, I laugh at husbands who spend the whole weekend washing the cars and doing yardwork, and wives who spend time cleaning a mc mansion.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on January 24, 2016 - 12:00am.

I know people on the east coast who spend precious time shoveling the walkway to their front door so it looks nice and tidy. But we know that people don't even walk on the walkways. They drive into the garage! So shoveling the snow is dumb make work.

Don't get me wrong, I like everything tidy and everything put away as you use it. But self-induced make work is dumb.

Submitted by flyer on January 24, 2016 - 7:03am.

There are lots of beautiful places to live in the world, but, regardless of where we go, we always prefer being back in San Diego--for many of reasons. Everyone prefers different things in life, and just about any climate you might choose is
available--somewhere in the world.

Most of the people we know who have left San Diego have done so for financial reasons, and not because they wanted to leave. I think we'll continue to see a lot of turnover in years to come as some realize they can't afford to retire here, while others arrive and start the cycle all over again. It's been that way for decades.

Submitted by svelte on January 24, 2016 - 8:31am.

flyer wrote:

Most of the people we know who have left San Diego have done so for financial reasons, and not because they wanted to leave...

agree...folks usually leave for money or family reasons.

I'm working with a lot of east coasters right now who are out here temporarily. They are happy as clams to not be at home right now and say so openly.

I don't mind at all that there are folks who would rather live elsewhere - I kinda wish there were more of'em. :0)

Submitted by NotCranky on January 24, 2016 - 9:40am.

Got up pretty early for a Sunday. What a beautiful moon fall it was. It is an absolutely gorgeous day. I can travel to the the snow.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on January 24, 2016 - 9:43am.

This is the new American home 2016 by the national association of home builders.
It doesn't have a lawn, fake Tuscan curved double staircases, ionic or Doric columns,
Corinthians elements, paladian windows, raises panel doors, or such imitation elements of the past.

Indoor-outdoor living is built into the design.

http://www.tnah.com/showpage_details.asp...

Submitted by bearishgurl on January 24, 2016 - 12:08pm.

flyer wrote:
. . . I think we'll continue to see a lot of turnover in years to come as some realize they can't afford to retire here, while others arrive and start the cycle all over again. It's been that way for decades.
It has. But only for the transplants who are unrealistic and expecting to automatically have the discretionary income they had back in the locale they moved here from (with lesser-expensive housing). Or expecting to have the same type of house and/or live in the same type of area they had back in the area they moved here from.

For those who are more realistic and move here with eyes open, obtain employment right away (preferably FT) and start working (yes, BOTH of them if they plan to be co-buyers here) and live below their means for their first years here to save money every month, I believe they will be able to buy a house. It may not be the all-brick 3000 sf mcmansion on 2/3 AC that they had back in TX but it will be a house with their own yard.

flyer, I believe you are referring to more recent (unrealistic) transplants to SD County who insist on "having it all" the minute they get settled in SD. And possibly transplants who first moved here 8-12 years ago and accepted a NINA mortgage to purchase a house beyond their means and later lost it.

A good portion of the population in SD County WERE "transplants" at one time and are now retired locally with defined benefit plans. This group did all the right things to remain here for life and are still living within their means in their retirement.

I see these unrealistic delusions being played out (and sometimes attacked by the locals) in one (expensive) US housing market after another on the city-data.com forum. Most of these inquiries come from the Gen Y crowd and in some cases, the "bored housewife" (a bit older) sitting at home while kids napping/in school and dreaming of relocating to SD/HI/CT/Boulder/Aspen/Malibu/Fairfax Co, VA/West Palm Beach, FL, etc.

I find it hilarious to read these threads. One of my favorite (repeat) questions is, "What can I rent in Boulder for $650 month? We have no kids but two big dogs and are outdoor people who need to be by hiking trails and close to the mountains."

Submitted by bearishgurl on January 24, 2016 - 12:30pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:
This is the new American home 2016 by the national association of home builders.
It doesn't have a lawn, fake Tuscan curved double staircases, ionic or Doric columns,
Corinthians elements, paladian windows, raises panel doors, or such imitation elements of the past.

Indoor-outdoor living is built into the design.

http://www.tnah.com/showpage_details.aspx?showpageID=32195

Looks like a small subdivision or spec-home development wa-a-a-ay outside of LV, FIH. I watched the video showing all the extra steps they're taking for energy conservation.

I just wonder if this type of "smart home" could pencil out for developers in CA (assuming they already owned their subdivision land). The difference in unimproved lot prices (w-a-a-ay out there in Clark County?) is likely $6K-$30K per lot versus ~$110K per lot in CA inland counties and up to $400K per lot in CA coastal counties. Could CA developers get their price after going thru all this extra work for each home? Maybe, depending on where the subdivision is.

The problem is that there really is little to no subdivision land left in CA coastal counties.

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