student loan foregiveness: BULLISH

User Forum Topic
Submitted by gzz on July 6, 2022 - 3:32pm

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/07/06/biden-ad...

Those monthly loan payments count against DTI and limit the mortgage amounts people can get.

They are also a psychological burden on young buyers.

Hopefully Biden will go with 50k in automatic forgiveness, no application required.

Income cutoffs are impractical. You are going to give someone with a $99,999 income a 50k loan forgiveness, but then say "sorry you get nothing" to someone who makes a dollar more?

You going to have the Dept of Education massively staff up and then start processing millions of applications for forgiveness? All just to stop a small number of high income borrowers from getting BidenBux? And these high income borrowers are both more likely to vote and more likely to be swing voters than low income student loan debtors.

Much easier to just cut balances by 50k a borrower, which can be done by a single programmer.

Submitted by Coronita on July 13, 2022 - 12:53am.

The-Shoveler wrote:
an wrote:

Nah, some lucky few have unplugged from the Matrix.

Coronita maybe?

Nah, I just don't give a sh1t most of the time. I'm learning some pretty important skills these days.

I built my own replacement wooden gate..working on a second one now.

I am learning how to weld. Because I need to replace a catalytic converter on a 94 Miata and the cheapest carb legal option it to buy a universal one and weld it in. Welding is really tough with a stick welder. I have new found respect for people who can do it. Its so damn hard for me to get the spark started and get the metal flowing. You need to get a good arc and pull the metal back so it doesn't stick and get the metal and flux flowing...and not burn a hole through what you are trying to weld..it's really hard for me....need to practice a lot.

see all these rich people....they can't lift a hand. And one thing that I sort of laugh about is when COVID kept everyone at home, watching some of these people try to handle when shit breaks was more entertaining than any late night show.

Submitted by sdduuuude on July 13, 2022 - 9:38am.

Glad to help w/ that woodworking any time, Coronita.
You know where I am.

Submitted by Coronita on July 13, 2022 - 11:00am.

sdduuuude wrote:
Glad to help w/ that woodworking any time, Coronita.
You know where I am.

thanks. I'm just an amateur...

I didn't have a real router and didn't think I would need one. So I just used my dremel and a plunge routing attachment. It was slow like a turtle and I won't win prizes on the gate design. But it's no worse looking the one old gate it replaced, lol...
f2f2
f1f1

I stained it one more time and blended out the plugged screw holes. 5 coats of stain total.

Putting lag bolts in concrete kinda scared me. I didn't think I would do it right. The guy who did it before me looks like missed a few times and used the wrong type of bolt attachments (the cheesy plastic ones you use indoors, lol).

lblb

Don't laugh... Well, if you do that's fine too.

Submitted by Navydoc on July 20, 2022 - 9:36pm.

Ok, if we're going to hijack this thread into DIY projects, I'd like to share mine:

Trike pic 1Trike pic 1
Trike pic 2Trike pic 2

Built this thing from scratch while I was at Camp Lejeune for 2 years. Had a lot of free time, not as busy as Balboa. It's both fully electric, or fully pedal powered, but it's so heavy you really don't want to pedal it...

It has a 72v battery, and 100 amp controller. I have it depowered quite a bit, as I'm afraid the Okinawan police are going to arrest me, since max power for Japanese ebikes is 250w. And it has a throttle which also makes it illegal (also true for California). When fully unleashed it is capable of 47 MPH on level ground, with about a 50 mile range. Can't wait to try this thing out in San Diego.

Tell me what you guys think. Been massively interested in ebikes the past three years, still riding the first one I built in San Diego in 2019. In San Diego they can be a real alternative to cars for commuting, but the current ebike laws are a bit too restrictive in my opinion.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on July 21, 2022 - 8:19am.

holy cow. I want to test ride it.

I think you are off on ebike motor limits in CA. throttles by themselves are legal on ebikes, however There is a speed limit of 28 mph for ebike motor assist, which sounds pretty low, but it feels actually pretty fast. In terms of efficiency ona regular bike. 28 mph puts up a lot of wind. However, on a recumbent trike like yours, perhaps witha full fairing, you could probably do in the 40s and not feel buffeted by the winds.

Very interesting project. i am very intrigued by electric minimalist vehicles. i've been riding from temecula to downtown san diego, going to the train in oceanside for half the trip. I would prefer a faster ebike, as it's a lot fo pedaling.

Submitted by sdrealtor on July 21, 2022 - 8:23am.

Wait till you get back. They are everywhere. I can’t leave my house without seeing ten of them. Extremely popular with 14 year old kids often with three kids piled on one. They need to regulate them better here before we see lots of kids getting hurt or worse. I saw a guy get killed on coast highway a few weeks ago. With that said they have great promises especially places like here. Cool thing you built yourself doc

Submitted by Coronita on July 21, 2022 - 10:51am.

that is so awesome Navydoc. 47mph...whoa.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on July 21, 2022 - 1:14pm.

revamp all roadways to accomodate electric bikes; half the capacity for cars, half for bicycles. make it actually feel safe for people, and then watch how many people ride their shortish commutes and errands by bike...cars should be rare, solely for the truly disabled, or the superwealthy, like flyer. ebikes should be the dominant vehicle in SD. Perhaps a $50/day tax for driving a car within SD.

Submitted by XBoxBoy on July 21, 2022 - 2:07pm.

Totally awesome. I'm curious, how much are you assembling from off the shelf parts and how much fabrication are you doing yourself? For instance, looks like the frame is aluminum. Are you welding the frame yourself? Maybe there are no welds, just bolted together pieces. But overall how much fabrication of parts do you need to do? Maybe being in the Navy you have access to a machine shop?

Submitted by Navydoc on July 21, 2022 - 4:14pm.

Scaredy, the classes for ebikes are more complicated than that.
Class I: No throttle, speed limit 20 MPH
Class II: Throttle ok, speed limit 20 MPH
Class III: No throttle, Speed limit 28 MPH
All above motors cannot exceed 750w
Class IV: Speed >28 MPH, motor >750w- these have to be registered as a moped.
Seriously convoluted, and I can assure you NO police officer understands these very well.

My vehicle doesn't fit into ANY of these categories except the class IV. I tried to get a Japanese plate on it, and City Hall here in Chatan was very accommodating. However, when I went to the vehicle registration office on base they refused to give me the necessary paperwork, stating "it has to comply with the manufacturer's specifications". I replied "I'm the manufacturer, it meets my specifications". They didn't want to hear that, so I'm riding it somewhat illegally, which is why I backed the power down. Japan puts the power max at 250w, but unless you put a tester on the battery I can just say it's a 36v battery and a 10 amp controller. This will also apply to San Diego cops, as nobody knows enough about these things, and I can tell them whatever I want.

Xbox, there are no welds. One of the things I want to do when I get back to San Diego is learn to weld aluminum. It would make everything so much easier, and I can make NavyTrike Mk II much lighter and simpler. As for off the shelf parts, the wheels are for a Rubbermaid dump cart, just changed to Go-cart bearings, and the brakes are standard 160 mm mountain bike hydraulic brakes/rotors. Took a lot of modification to get the brake discs mounted on the wheels. Also it took me 6 different steering designs to get one I liked. The only machine tools I used to build this was a chop saw with an aluminum blade, and a bench top drill press (both from Harbor Freight). Larger machine tools would be nice, but I COULD have done the whole thing with a hacksaw and a hand drill.

For the design configuration it has a 72v battery which can deliver 60 amps, and a controller that can put out 100 amps. So the power is effectively 4320w. I have it powered down to about 1500w, and as long as I don't get too crazy with the speed, I can fly under the radar.

My ultimate plan is to build a body around it and make a velomobile, but I don't have anywhere in Okinawa I can work with the fiberglass. I also have a solar panel to incorporate into the hood, so it will charge itself. Works quite well. I too am very intrigued by minimalist electric vehicles. It's just funny that something like this, which CAN effectively replace a car is totally illegal right now.

Submitted by Coronita on July 21, 2022 - 4:53pm.

Navydoc wrote:
Scaredy, the classes for ebikes are more complicated than that.
Class I: No throttle, speed limit 20 MPH
Class II: Throttle ok, speed limit 20 MPH
Class III: No throttle, Speed limit 28 MPH
All above motors cannot exceed 750w
Class IV: Speed >28 MPH, motor >750w- these have to be registered as a moped.
Seriously convoluted, and I can assure you NO police officer understands these very well.

My vehicle doesn't fit into ANY of these categories except the class IV. I tried to get a Japanese plate on it, and City Hall here in Chatan was very accommodating. However, when I went to the vehicle registration office on base they refused to give me the necessary paperwork, stating "it has to comply with the manufacturer's specifications". I replied "I'm the manufacturer, it meets my specifications". They didn't want to hear that, so I'm riding it somewhat illegally, which is why I backed the power down. Japan puts the power max at 250w, but unless you put a tester on the battery I can just say it's a 36v battery and a 10 amp controller. This will also apply to San Diego cops, as nobody knows enough about these things, and I can tell them whatever I want.

Xbox, there are no welds. One of the things I want to do when I get back to San Diego is learn to weld aluminum. It would make everything so much easier, and I can make NavyTrike Mk II much lighter and simpler. As for off the shelf parts, the wheels are for a Rubbermaid dump cart, just changed to Go-cart bearings, and the brakes are standard 160 mm mountain bike hydraulic brakes/rotors. Took a lot of modification to get the brake discs mounted on the wheels. Also it took me 6 different steering designs to get one I liked. The only machine tools I used to build this was a chop saw with an aluminum blade, and a bench top drill press (both from Harbor Freight). Larger machine tools would be nice, but I COULD have done the whole thing with a hacksaw and a hand drill.

For the design configuration it has a 72v battery which can deliver 60 amps, and a controller that can put out 100 amps. So the power is effectively 4320w. I have it powered down to about 1500w, and as long as I don't get too crazy with the speed, I can fly under the radar.

My ultimate plan is to build a body around it and make a velomobile, but I don't have anywhere in Okinawa I can work with the fiberglass. I also have a solar panel to incorporate into the hood, so it will charge itself. Works quite well. I too am very intrigued by minimalist electric vehicles. It's just funny that something like this, which CAN effectively replace a car is totally illegal right now.

Don't take welding lessons from me... trust me. It isn't pretty... I suck...

weldingwelding

Somehow, stick welding is a lot harder than it seems. It's right up there with painting, that I can never get right.

I managed to burn through steel a few times... I can't imagine how I'll do with aluminum...

Submitted by Navydoc on July 21, 2022 - 5:21pm.

I think the MIG wire welders are easier. I actually know how to Oxy-Acetylene weld, which is supposed to be harder. Dates back to my early days in the mid 80s as a gunsmith.
(Wonder how many people can state gunsmith to OB/GYN/MFM as a career path).
Plan on buying a MIG package at good old Harbor Freight when I return. they have one that comes with the spool gun. I have many, many aluminum scraps to practice with.

Submitted by Coronita on July 21, 2022 - 5:48pm.

Navydoc wrote:
I think the MIG wire welders are easier. I actually know how to Oxy-Acetylene weld, which is supposed to be harder. Dates back to my early days in the mid 80s as a gunsmith.
(Wonder how many people can state gunsmith to OB/GYN/MFM as a career path).
Plan on buying a MIG package at good old Harbor Freight when I return. they have one that comes with the spool gun. I have many, many aluminum scraps to practice with.

I was afraid you were going to say a MIG welder might be easier.

This was $60 on amazon, and had pretty good reviews.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07W7P943W

But I was contemplating getting the MIG version.

https://www.amazon.com/YESWELDER-FLUX-13...

Ended up going with the $60 bargain basement one.

I guess I went too cheap. Anyone want a stick welder?

Submitted by Navydoc on July 21, 2022 - 6:38pm.

To be fair, I think the one I'm looking at is $569. Will properly time the Harbor Freight coupon......

Submitted by Navydoc on July 21, 2022 - 7:45pm.

By the way, wanted to go back to the safety aspect. My last year in San Diego I was riding from Stonebridge to Balboa on an ebike conversion I built myself (would probably meet your performance requirements scaredy). I was absolutely clobbered on Pomerado road, apparently near the light at Semillon. I have no memory of it. Woke up 2 1/2 hours later at Sharp Memorial. Those of you who know the road know there's a generous bike lane. The person that hit me didn't stop, and they never caught them. The police got 2 phone calls, one stating they just saw a car hit a bike, and the other said they just saw a biker flip over their handlebars (I think that might have been the person who hit me). I've always theorized that the reason they didn't stop was because they may have thought they killed me. I'm sure I went down in a heap, and didn't move.

The point is, I'm not sure that Pomerado could be made any safer for bicyclists, especially with inattentive and inconsiderate drivers. However, I can't stop biking to work, I don't feel like myself when I don't do it. But the infrastructure we have is not bike friendly, and this is one of the MOST bike friendly cities in the country.

Submitted by Coronita on July 22, 2022 - 12:40am.

Have you thought about hooking up an automotive horn? I mean , it probably wouldn't have helped the last time, but I have a lot of near misses with large trucks and SUVs that can't see me. The stock horns on the Miatas are too soft. So I got myself a pair of Hellas Supertones for both of them

HELLA 003399801 Supertone 12V High Tone / Low Tone Twin Horn Kit with Red Protective Grill, 2 Horns https://a.co/d/5M2Hzyu

Submitted by scaredyclassic on July 22, 2022 - 10:46am.

https://qz.com/1620913/the-best-cycling-...

pool noodles. i believe in a large profile, but not sure it is the answer to everything.

sorry to hear of the assault you suffered.

Submitted by evolusd on July 22, 2022 - 3:31pm.

Navydoc wrote:
By the way, wanted to go back to the safety aspect. My last year in San Diego I was riding from Stonebridge to Balboa on an ebike conversion I built myself (would probably meet your performance requirements scaredy). I was absolutely clobbered on Pomerado road, apparently near the light at Semillon. I have no memory of it. Woke up 2 1/2 hours later at Sharp Memorial. Those of you who know the road know there's a generous bike lane. The person that hit me didn't stop, and they never caught them. The police got 2 phone calls, one stating they just saw a car hit a bike, and the other said they just saw a biker flip over their handlebars (I think that might have been the person who hit me). I've always theorized that the reason they didn't stop was because they may have thought they killed me. I'm sure I went down in a heap, and didn't move.

The point is, I'm not sure that Pomerado could be made any safer for bicyclists, especially with inattentive and inconsiderate drivers. However, I can't stop biking to work, I don't feel like myself when I don't do it. But the infrastructure we have is not bike friendly, and this is one of the MOST bike friendly cities in the country.

That is a wild story, glad you survived. My teen daughter wants an ebike so bad like all her friends. I personally find it nuts that all these parents let their kids ride around town on streets that are basically highways with 50 mph speed limits and so many drivers distracted by their phones. Seems completely unsafe to me. Haven't given in...yet.

Submitted by Navydoc on July 22, 2022 - 6:09pm.

Love the pool noodle, no matter how ridiculous it looks. I have to admit, San Diegans are much better to bikers than other places I've lived. When I was at Walter Reed at least once a week someone would yell out their window "get on the sidewalk you F-ing A-hole!" They don't realize that the data clearly shows that you're almost twice as likely to be hit by a car when you're riding on the sidewalk, and 4 times as likely when doing it against traffic. You are much safer on the road, since they at least see you to yell at you. In North Carolina I wouldn't ride off-base. Did it a couple of times, WAY too many close calls with hyper-velocity pickup trucks. Fortunately at Lejeune I lived on-base.

The trike does have an auto horn, and it is LOUD. Scared the crap out of a runner (happens to be the ICU physician here) I was coming up behind. I installed a bell for pedestrians, and it is a lot better. Funny how people react to the trike, it gets a LOT of attention. I feel like I'm going to cause an accident from all the rubber-necking that drivers do.

Submitted by Coronita on July 23, 2022 - 12:49am.

Finished my other gate.

Gate2Gate2

Turned out ok, have a gap larger than I'd like but then again over time , wood gates warp and expand a bit so hopefully won't need to deal with that.

Ended up breaking my Dremel trying to use it as a router..so I bought a cheap router on Amazon. The router isn't bad for light work. $60, but free with my Amazon/Chase rebate.

The 1 gallon stain from Home Depot was $50, almost the same cost as the router. Man, price for a gallon of wlpaint/stain has gone way up.

Neighbor jokingly asked if I could make her one too. She called a handyman and the current cost getting one made is around $1500. Ouch. I think my limber costs where around $100... Then misc other items and tools around $150. Plus I got to learn how to use a router and kept the tools.

Submitted by svelte on July 24, 2022 - 12:20am.

scaredyclassic wrote:
Navydoc wrote:
Will they reimburse me for the debt I already paid back? Didn't think so....

Education is such a scam. Why did I need three semesters of calculus to go to medical school?

Law schools worse ... But really, the degree has little to do with training. It's just a weeding out process.

Spot on again scaredy!

A long time ago I quizzed one of my mentors on why we only hired people with 4-year engineering degrees when there are other ways to gain the same knowledge without a degree.

His answer: it showed that the person could stay devoted to something for four years.

I've thought about that often over the years.

It is indeed a weeding process.

Love that you could summarize it so succinctly.

Submitted by svelte on July 24, 2022 - 12:29am.

Coronita wrote:
Finished my other gate.

Wow flu that is really gorgeous. Very tastefully done.

The colors and textures in that entire photo are perfect...the two tones of stucco, the eave color, the front door color, the plants and yellow flowers, the art deco light style, very well done. Someone has a good eye.

When I drive around and see how many tacky things have been done to homes it is depressing.

Submitted by svelte on July 24, 2022 - 12:35am.

Navydoc wrote:
By the way, wanted to go back to the safety aspect. My last year in San Diego I was riding from Stonebridge to Balboa on an ebike conversion I built myself (would probably meet your performance requirements scaredy). I was absolutely clobbered on Pomerado road, apparently near the light at Semillon. I have no memory of it. Woke up 2 1/2 hours later at Sharp Memorial. Those of you who know the road know there's a generous bike lane. The person that hit me didn't stop, and they never caught them. The police got 2 phone calls, one stating they just saw a car hit a bike, and the other said they just saw a biker flip over their handlebars (I think that might have been the person who hit me). I've always theorized that the reason they didn't stop was because they may have thought they killed me. I'm sure I went down in a heap, and didn't move.

This happened to a friend of mine in Carlsbad about 5 years back. I think it was on El Camino Real with a wide shoulder and bike lane. He said he woke up in the ambulance - whoever hit him didn't stay at the scene.

Biking takes devotion and balls apparently.

Submitted by svelte on July 24, 2022 - 12:40am.

scaredyclassic wrote:
revamp all roadways to accomodate electric bikes; half the capacity for cars, half for bicycles. make it actually feel safe for people, and then watch how many people ride their shortish commutes and errands by bike...cars should be rare, solely for the truly disabled, or the superwealthy, like flyer. ebikes should be the dominant vehicle in SD. Perhaps a $50/day tax for driving a car within SD.

I'm OK with that as long as bikes pay for their infrastructure. So much gets paid for by the car gas taxes. Bikers should pay for their bike lanes. Users should pay for what they use.

It is going to be interesting to see how things get paid for once the percentage of electric cars on the roadway reaches a tipping point.

Submitted by Coronita on July 24, 2022 - 8:59pm.

Wrapping up the other not so pretty project. Finally welded the flanges onto the new catalytic converter. It took awhile to get the flanges and universal converter lined up correctly with a not-so-straight piping on the first generation Miata....weird...

Anyway, function over form.... And I can weld without getting the welding stick, stuck so often on the target piece.

catcat

Don't look so bad if painted with high temp flat black paint, lol...
catbcatb

But the most important thing is, smog passed. Barely, right on the money...smogsmog

I can put the race cat back on the car, lol

Submitted by scaredyclassic on July 25, 2022 - 10:05am.

yes.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on July 25, 2022 - 10:05am.

svelte wrote:
scaredyclassic wrote:
revamp all roadways to accomodate electric bikes; half the capacity for cars, half for bicycles. make it actually feel safe for people, and then watch how many people ride their shortish commutes and errands by bike...cars should be rare, solely for the truly disabled, or the superwealthy, like flyer. ebikes should be the dominant vehicle in SD. Perhaps a $50/day tax for driving a car within SD.

I'm OK with that as long as bikes pay for their infrastructure. So much gets paid for by the car gas taxes. Bikers should pay for their bike lanes. Users should pay for what they use.

It is going to be interesting to see how things get paid for once the percentage of electric cars on the roadway reaches a tipping point.

I'm willing to do that, so long as we also all pay for the externalized costs...the damage to the environemnt, the relative longevity of bike usage on roads v. cars, the unreimbursed medical bills from crashes, etc.

Submitted by Coronita on July 27, 2022 - 10:12pm.

Another completed summer project...

Changed the faucet and popup drain on this pedestal sink...

sinksink

What a royal pain in the ass.

The drain was all rusted and the faucet handles finally broke off beyond repair. It's never been changed, the previous owner gave me a credit before we moved in and I quickly understood why. The only real way to change the faucet and drain was to remove the sink from the wall and the floor, so the faucet and drain could be accessible. There's not enough clearance when it's still attached to the wall to be able to stick a wrench in there to remove the locking nut for the drain and the locking nuts for the two faucet handles...

In addition, this sink was not simply bolted to the wall. It was glued, so removing it would destroy the drywall and I would need to re-drywall and replace the faucet and drain. Even my trusty plumber didn't really want to do the job. He said I needed to find someone to first remove the sink.. But then if that's the case, there's no point in me getting the plumber to change it....

So, finally, when the handle broke off beyond repair, I spent last weekend trying to figure out how to change it without destroying my wall....YouTube was no help, because all the YouTube videos showed people removing the sink from the wall.

Removing the p-trap, and water lines was the easy part...
ptrapptrap

Removing the the two valves and spout was easy too. I just put a large vise grip on the fixture on top and turned, since I didn't care about damaging the finish of the fixture..Things turned enough from the top, that I was able to tilt the valve and spout and reach the locking nut on the bottom with a long vice grip, and I shredded the locking nut taking it off.

But taking off the drain was incredibly difficult..

draindrain
Accessing the lock nut on the drain was really hard, since it was right under here...
draindrain
and there was no room to put a wrench or any tool up there. Not even short hand offset wrenches, or angled plumber pipe wrenches like these:

https://www.amazon.com/HAUTMEC-Telescopi...

So, after trying numerous things, brute force etc...I decided to go to Oreilly Auto Parts and borrow the inner tie rod removal tool that I once borrowed to remove the inner tie rods to my Audi...
Why not, since loaner tools are FREE as long as you return them in 2 weeks.

tie rod tooltie rod tool

The tie rod tool is a big ole pipe that has a bunch of different sized steel inserts for different hex nuts to turn (different tie rods on cars). I hoped one of them would fit on the drain nut, and I would slip the entire pipe over the drain and turn the nut from the bottom...

It WORKED...Sort of... The pipe too long so I could only turn drain nut down about 1cm. But that was enough for me to lift up the rusted drain from the top...and have enough room to.... cut the drain with my air grinder... heh heh..brute force...

draindrain
bye byebye bye

Putting the new drain in was easy since the new drains are all plastic and are all hand-tightened with collar you hand turn... No tools required.
Putting the new spout on was easy too since it was easy to access the tightening bolt.

However, the faucet valves were a real PITA...Moen really cheapened their design, and the way the new valves are attached, there's a C-clip on top that holds the valve to sink, and there's a very thin lock nut on the bottom you turn to tighten it.
locknutlocknut

The problem is the lock nut on the bottom is so thin, it's hard to reach and grip in a tight spot, especially on a pedestal sink. There was no way to get a tool in there to turn the lock nut...
grrrgrrr

Also, you'll notice Moen's new brilliant cheapened design on the valve, where the water line inlets are directly welded onto the main valve shaft. That prevents installer from using any of these long tube nut wrenches, since the welded inlet would prevent the long tube wrenches from turning.

https://www.amazon.com/Installer-Multifu...

Total cheap and idiotic design that adds labor costs to the consumer.

So after thinking for a few hours, and almost caving in and deciding to remove the pedestal since from the wall, I came up with a crazy idea.

I got a PVC plastic pipe cap, and hammered the brass locknut into it. And used superglue and bakesoda to bond the locknut to the PVC cap so it would not come out.
pvc1pvc1

pvc2pvc2

I could then use the PVC cap as a hand tightening tool to hand tighten the lock nut onto the valve, and not use any wrenches etc in that tight space. Something like this:

pvc3pvc3

It worked!
pvc4pvc4

If you notice, the lock nut is on the bottom, then pvc cap on top, and the metal washer on top of the PVC cap. This is fine because the PVC cap is sandwiched between the sink and the lock nut, so even if someone tried to pull up on the faucet handle from the top with great force, the valve won't move. Also, since the pvc cap is sandwiched between the metal washer and the lock nut, there's no longer metal to metal contact, so over long time, the lock nut wont bind to the washer from rust. It should be easy to remove the valve in the future, hand turning the PVC pipe caps.

Shame on you Moen for not making this install easier like this...

done!done!
Was it worth the time doing it this way, instead of ripping out the sink and redoing the wall... I don't know...

But if you folks ever need to replace your faucet and drain on a pedestal sink, but don't want to rip the sink out of the wall, now you know it's possible!

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