Splitting a lot in two

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Submitted by XBoxBoy on May 30, 2018 - 2:45pm

Can anyone shed some light onto this. A house in our neighborhood, (currently zoned single family residential) with a single house on it is being marketed as potentially being split and able to build two houses on the lot. It is not two lots currently, just one lot.

What is involved in splitting a lot? How much approval is needed. (The lot is probably big enough to be split but just barely)

What hoops does a person who wants to take a lot with one current house on it have to go through to split the lot and build two houses?

Oh, and this is in La Jolla. (San Diego legally)

Thanks in advance,

XBoxBoy.

Submitted by moneymaker on May 31, 2018 - 8:31pm.

As far as I know just need 5000 sq. ft. for each lot to split. Different cities have different requirements. For example in Lemon Grove you need 6000 sq. ft.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on May 31, 2018 - 11:24am.

Almost impossible. Worse than communism when it comes to property rights. I wish the Supreme Court would reverse itself on the taking away of private property through zoning.

I would call the broker to see if seller has entitlements or if it’s just bullshit marketing.

Basically it depends on the size of the lot and setback requirements. Visit the planning department and ask what the requirements are for the lot. The owner can always get a variance, in which case the more money you have to throw at it, the better. You can appeal all the way to the city council. But need to pay architect for drawings, pay application fees, etc.... if you’re denied, all the money is wasted.

Submitted by Hatfield on May 31, 2018 - 8:12pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:
I wish the Supreme Court would reverse itself on the taking away of private property through zoning.

I never understood this kind of talk. I have libertarian friends who say stuff like this. Really? You want somebody to be able to open a gas station next to you?

As for OP's original question, use the APN to find the legal description of the property. It may be that the parcel is two lots already. Very common in OB, and I'm guessing other neighborhoods as well. The legal description will read something like "Lot 47 and 48 in block 39 of subdivision whatever in the city of san diego, country of san diego, blah blah blah." It is my understanding that it's much less work to split a parcel that is comprised of more than one lot.

Submitted by XBoxBoy on June 1, 2018 - 7:07am.

Hatfield wrote:
It may be that the parcel is two lots already.

In this particular case it is one lot.

From what little I know I think FlyerInHi is on track with pointing out the issue will be setbacks and such. The lot is more or less square so splitting it and maintaining setbacks will be tough.

Submitted by SDNative2 on June 1, 2018 - 6:51pm.

Depending upon zoning, you can get away with less square footage per lot. I have a lot zoned RM-1-1, over 7500 sq ft., and I can split into 3 parcels because one side is an alley.

You really need to go to the City of SD Planning Dept. and verify for yourself. Actually, go three separate times, get names, and take the best two out of three answers. If you're lucky, you might just get something in writing.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 1, 2018 - 8:40pm.

SDNative2 wrote:

You really need to go to the City of SD Planning Dept. and verify for yourself. Actually, go three separate times, get names, and take the best two out of three answers. If you're lucky, you might just get something in writing.

Haha... that was really funny. Nothing is set in stone until you submit an application that is reviewed and approved. Asking questions is one thing but whoever answers questions doesn’t have the whole picture.

I have a friend who is an urban planner in a metro further north... and he has people cussing as him, etc... when he denies them.

Submitted by La Jolla Renter on June 1, 2018 - 9:03pm.

90% of the time it is way easier than you would think if it meets all the zoning requirements. A simple trip down to the planning office will get you a fairly reliable answer.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 2, 2018 - 11:17pm.

90% of the time, it’s harder than you think.
Remember, there is a also public notice of your development plans. How do you think the jealous neighbors will react?
https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/f...

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 2, 2018 - 11:13pm.

Hatfield wrote:
FlyerInHi wrote:
I wish the Supreme Court would reverse itself on the taking away of private property through zoning.

I never understood this kind of talk. I have libertarian friends who say stuff like this. Really? You want somebody to be able to open a gas station next to you?

Yes. I want to see densificaion. San Diego would look better more like Monaco than the sprawl that it is now.

Submitted by La Jolla Renter on June 3, 2018 - 10:49am.

FlyerInHi wrote:
90% of the time, it’s harder than you think.
Remember, there is a also public notice of your development plans. How do you think the jealous neighbors will react?
https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/files/legacy/planning/community/pdf/cow/reviewprocess.pdf

My limited but legit experience is that the public notice and or hearing is just part of the process. The property zoning trumps a neighbor that doesn't like you or your plans. In addition, the city currently wants more density and tax revenue. They are on your side. That's why the city just relaxed the cost and process to add a granny flat to an R1.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 3, 2018 - 11:54am.

That's good news. I believe Jerry brown signed a bill last year that relaxed granny flats statewide. The state gave localitities some time to comply. More building by small landlowners will diversity the housing stock.

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