Shake Shingle Roof

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Submitted by bub on October 22, 2007 - 8:31am

Can someone tell me why anyone would still have a shake shingle roof(unless they are destitute)?

Just heard the same old story house with SSR is toast next to other houses that have anything but a SSR that are fine.

Do insurance companies provide coverage for houses with SSR's?

Nailing kindling to your roof in known fire hazard areas. Brilliant.

Submitted by OC Burns on October 22, 2007 - 4:25pm.

When I was a kid, my folks got a new roof and tossed some old shake shingle in the fireplace to see how it burned. The stuff nearly exploded, it burned so fast. Almost like it had been soaked in fuel. One of the houses near us had burned down because of a bottle rocket.... I can't imagine a raging fire like these getting near those old rooftops without torching it.

Submitted by VoZangre on October 22, 2007 - 4:31pm.

Nail on the head, Bub...

been driving round this summer thinking about the drought, wondering why in the world, in this environ, you'd have ANYTHING besides tile?

Submitted by Coronita on October 22, 2007 - 6:04pm.

yo,

 

When you have a firestorm, it won't matter if it's tile or shake. It all burns down. Moot point.

 

Submitted by bub on October 22, 2007 - 7:18pm.

It ain't always a firestorm. It could simply be an burning ember or....

OC Burns "One of the houses near us had burned down because of a bottle rocket.... "

Submitted by VoZangre on October 22, 2007 - 9:03pm.

Dome houses...

made of adobe would withstand fire better than stuccobox tracts, methinks...

Submitted by OC Burns on October 23, 2007 - 7:03am.

"When you have a firestorm, it won't matter if it's tile or shake. It all burns down. Moot point."

That's true. But the people in my neighborhood were scared that the firestorm would be caused by one of those old shake-roof houses. Any little thing could start them burning. So, if there was a firestorm a distance away, and one of the embers blew into our 'hood, it would be much more likely to start a raging firestorm if it landed on the shake roof next door than if those folks had installed a tile roof. I guess that was the point, really... when your neighbor's shake roof becomes a firestorm, it puts your house in danger.

Many of our neighbors used to put a sprinkler on their roof on the 4th of July. It was like air defence for bottle rockets.

Submitted by bsrsharma on October 24, 2007 - 11:27am.

On a more general note, after this catastrophe, will there be a premium for homes that can be shown to be fire resistent (with construction materials/techniques, foam coating etc.,)? I saw a video of AIG spraying fire retardant foam at their own expense on high end homes to save paying replacement costs. The woodframe based construction seems very inadequate and unsuited to SoCal weather. Greater use of metallic or non-combustible building materials should be encouraged both through building codes and market demand. If enough potential buyers start getting cold feet buying wood framed homes, that can start a trend. How many of you potential buyers will pay attention to fire resistance in your future home purchase decisions?

Submitted by Raybyrnes on October 24, 2007 - 2:20pm.

Major Insurance companies such as Farmers Insurance stopped insuring homes with shake shingle roofing as far back as 7 years ago. I am not certain if they non renewed policies that were already covered.

Submitted by cashcow on October 24, 2007 - 8:43pm.

"wondering why in the world, in this environ, you'd have ANYTHING besides tile?"

BECAUSE IT COSTS TOO MUCH, DUH?

Submitted by kewp on October 24, 2007 - 9:04pm.

From what I remember of the Cedar fires, tile wasn't a big win as they are glued to roof with tar. The embers blow up under the tile and it burns down anyway.

Submitted by ucodegen on September 3, 2009 - 8:24am.

When you have a firestorm, it won't matter if it's tile or shake. It all burns down. Moot point.

No, it does matter. Not everything burns in a firestorm. A blown ember will touch off a shake roof by just landing on the roof. For a tile roof to burn, the ember has to get onto the tar-paper underneath the tile, up into the eves or in an open window/door. If the tile roof is properly built, the ember can't get under. There are eve vents that prevent embers from getting through. As for the doors and windows, that is up to the homeowner.

From what I remember of the Cedar fires, tile wasn't a big win as they are glued to roof with tar.

No they are not glued with tar. The tiles are nailed through pre-drilled holes in the tiles. The problem is with the 'spanish' style tiles. There is an open channel going up under the tile unless a blocking plate or tile is placed at the ends. Flat interlocking tiles are the safest in fire zones. The other thing to watch out for are 'open eves' on the roof and 'eve vents'. Most eve vents allow embers to be blown into a house's attic, after which "thats all she wrote".

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