Rethinking early retirement

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Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 21, 2020 - 12:37pm

Submitted by gzz on September 21, 2020 - 1:21pm.

That writing is painfully bad, wordy and repetitive.

I couldn't read past the first few paragraphs.

Submitted by pencilneck on September 21, 2020 - 1:25pm.

There happens to be an awesome local discussion group that generally uses School of Life material as a focal point for the conversations.

School of Life is terrific, but it tends to present a particularly strong view from a single narrow viewpoint of a topic. Whether one agrees or disagrees, it provides fertile ground for conversation.

If you're interested, Google "Thinking While Drinking" The scheduling is done primarily through Meetup.com.

Currently the discussion are primarily online due to covid. I haven't attended an online conversation. However, I very much enjoyed the in-person conversations I attended. I'm looking forward to them returning.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 21, 2020 - 1:42pm.

pencilneck wrote:
There happens to be an awesome local discussion group that generally uses School of Life material as a focal point for the conversations.

School of Life is terrific, but it tends to present a particularly strong view from a single narrow viewpoint of a topic. Whether one agrees or disagrees, it provides fertile ground for conversation.

If you're interested, Google "Thinking While Drinking" The scheduling is done primarily through Meetup.com.

Currently the discussion are primarily online due to covid. I haven't attended an online conversation. However, I very much enjoyed the in-person conversations I attended. I'm looking forward to them returning.

Thnx . I have read almost all of dw bottons books. I would be interested in talking with people who engage with him.

Submitted by svelte on September 21, 2020 - 1:57pm.

On youtube there are a lot of channels that follow the FIRE (Financial Independence, Retire Early) crowd. Some of those folks are in their 20s and 30s!

A few things I've noticed:
1. Some of them consider "retirement" to be synonymous with "not working for someone else". They're really working for themselves as maintaining a youtube channel really is work. Depending on how often they put out videos, it could be a full time job!

2. Some of them think they can live the rest of their life on just a few hundred thousand dollars. To my way of thinking, they have a lot of audacity to think they can map out how that money will last over many more decades. Life is full of nasty surprises.

3. They seem to equate not working to happiness. I have to admit I'd be happier working less than 40 hours, but I truly do enjoy my job so I'm not sure how much happier, if any, I will be when I retire.

Submitted by sdrealtor on September 21, 2020 - 2:12pm.

I dont know that I could ever stop completely. I get too much enjoyment out of competing and winning

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 21, 2020 - 3:32pm.

This articles a bit different. It says that while we think we want early retirement from work, what we might actually need is early retirement from other stuff. I may declare my retirement from driving, reading the news, travel, and showering in the next decade. Also retire from trying to be entertaining, hurrying, and eating out.

"Ironically, it might not even be work that many of us most want to retire from. We might be far keener to retire from, let’s say, late nights, going to the theatre, using social media, holidaying abroad or having sex with new people. Take the idea of announcing ‘early retirement’ from parties. Usually, if someone turns down every invitation and stays at home, they’d be seen as lonely and withdrawn – and probably unfit for human company. But suppose we could say that we’d ‘retired’ from social life; our decision would instantly acquire nobility and prestige. We’d be seen to be giving up not because we couldn’t stand other people or because we were gauche or unpopular. The implication would be that we might have been perfectly capable of making witty conversation over cocktails – but that we had decided we’d done enough of that sort of thing and were going to concentrate instead on deepening our friendships with just two or three people or on learning a new language by ourselves in bed. "

Submitted by svelte on September 21, 2020 - 4:18pm.

scaredyclassic wrote:
This articles a bit different. It says that while we think we want early retirement from work, what we might actually need is early retirement from other stuff. I may declare my retirement from driving, reading the news, travel, and showering in the next decade. Also retire from trying to be entertaining, hurrying, and eating out.

yes, I read it. I usually do more of "taking a break" from those type of things. If I get bored doing them, I stop for awhile.

Sooner or later I yearn for them again and they back on the schedule.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 21, 2020 - 5:09pm.

When i am an old woman i shall wear purple.

Huh. Never avtually read the poem beforr... its kind of a retirement poem.

https://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk...

When i am an old man, i will only wear acid related t shirts.

https://tsptr.com/products/drop-acid-rag...

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 21, 2020 - 5:10pm.

Warning
Jenny Joseph

When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we’ve no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I’m tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick flowers in other people’s gardens
And learn to spit.

You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.

But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.

But maybe I ought to practise a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.

Submitted by svelte on September 21, 2020 - 7:24pm.

That is a great poem!

I've already started by list of things I'm gonna do when I retire and don't have to care what anyone thinks...I don't really care too much right now but have to keep up appearances to stay employed. :-)

Maybe I'll start buying purple clothes. To practice.

Submitted by flyer on September 21, 2020 - 7:32pm.

I've always felt that we should always be living the lives we want to live--retired or not--and if you've realistically determined your finances will last for the duration of your lifetime--that gives even more peace of mind.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 21, 2020 - 7:47pm.

flyer wrote:
I've always felt that we should always be living the lives we want to live--retired or not--and if you've realistically determined your finances will last for the duration of your lifetime--that gives even more peace of mind.

Haha. Lol. LOL. Loooooool.

Was reading AN UPHEAVAL,chekhov short story earlier today. An upper class wife wrongfully accuses her staff of stealing her jewelry. She searches the young governess' room and this indignity profoundly disturbs the naive governess.

"Mashenka went into her room, and then, for the first time in her life, , it was her lot to experience in all its acuteness the feeling that is so familiar to persons in dependent positions, who eat the bread of the rich and powerful, and cannot speak their minds. There was a search going on in her room."

Virtually all of us must for years eat crumbs from the rich and powerful. But even the rich in that story are scrambling...

And our kids too.

Fortunately, we have chekhov to help explain life...

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 21, 2020 - 7:47pm.

svelte wrote:
That is a great poem!

I've already started by list of things I'm gonna do when I retire and don't have to care what anyone thinks...I don't really care too much right now but have to keep up appearances to stay employed. :-)

Maybe I'll start buying purple clothes. To practice.

Poem inspired the red hat society...
https://www.redhatsociety.com/

Submitted by flyer on September 21, 2020 - 8:08pm.

Scaredy, thank you so much for enlightening me. LOL.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 21, 2020 - 8:12pm.

flyer wrote:
Scaredy, thank you so much for enlightening me. LOL.

Never had to eat shit climbing your way up the ladder?

The guy cross the street had to sell his house in less than a year. Pilot. Assume he got covid fucked at work. Stretched too far.

Hes like all of us, same dream, same plan except shitty timing.

Submitted by flyer on September 21, 2020 - 8:17pm.

Sure, but that brief moment passed rather quickly.

Yeah, it's sad what's happening with the airlines now. No one could have seen this coming. Have lots of friends who took early retirements.

I retired from American before 60 thanks to real estate. Another reason to have a "Plan B."

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 21, 2020 - 8:37pm.

Most of us in the USA have to eat huge servings of shit, every day, some right up till the last day of work.

Submitted by svelte on September 21, 2020 - 8:48pm.

flyer wrote:

I retired from American before 60 thanks to real estate. Another reason to have a "Plan B."

Well that explains how you've done it - pilots make a great living. If you've got perfect eyesight and are over 6 feet tall, you're eligible to attempt a career as a pilot.

I would have never been eligible.

Many of my current and former neighbors are pilots. One of them, an American pilot, rarely ever worked. He always opted for the standby slots and was home almost all the time. Downside: he could never drink because he didn't know if he'd be called in. Sometimes us neighbors would watch their kids overnight for them (his wife was a nurse). They were great people so we didn't mind, but he sure made a lot of money for not much work.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 21, 2020 - 9:39pm.

svelte wrote:
flyer wrote:

I retired from American before 60 thanks to real estate. Another reason to have a "Plan B."

Well that explains how you've done it - pilots make a great living. If you've got perfect eyesight and are over 6 feet tall, you're eligible to attempt a career as a pilot.

I would have never been eligible.

Many of my current and former neighbors are pilots. One of them, an American pilot, rarely ever worked. He always opted for the standby slots and was home almost all the time. Downside: he could never drink because he didn't know if he'd be called in. Sometimes us neighbors would watch their kids overnight for them (his wife was a nurse). They were great people so we didn't mind, but he sure made a lot of money for not much work.

Dang unions. Providing flyer a good life. No more of that! Capital supreme, labor eat poo.

Would be better to feel free ones whole life indeed. Ive been so worried about my place in society so long its difficult to imagine not worrying.

Thats perhaps the dream of retirement. That you no longer have to care what the marketplace thinks of you. No more worrying about your performance.. . Youre just a free old weirdo.

But then...thats possible at any moment. Just...stop caring...

Submitted by flyer on September 21, 2020 - 11:08pm.

svelte wrote:
flyer wrote:

I retired from American before 60 thanks to real estate. Another reason to have a "Plan B."

Well that explains how you've done it - pilots make a great living. If you've got perfect eyesight and are over 6 feet tall, you're eligible to attempt a career as a pilot.

I would have never been eligible.

Many of my current and former neighbors are pilots. One of them, an American pilot, rarely ever worked. He always opted for the standby slots and was home almost all the time. Downside: he could never drink because he didn't know if he'd be called in. Sometimes us neighbors would watch their kids overnight for them (his wife was a nurse). They were great people so we didn't mind, but he sure made a lot of money for not much work.

Other than the fact that I have loved flying since I was a kid, one of the main reasons I chose the profession after college was the reserve system.

As you mentioned with your friends, due to seniority, I bid reserve (standby) for many years, and was rarely called to fly, and still maintained the same income, which allowed lots of time to build the real estate portfolio, etc., spend time with the kids growing up, etc.

Many of the pilots I've known have done similar things--invested in franchises, real estate, car dealerships etc.--since it allows you to have another life apart from the job.

I'm grateful to have enjoyed the profession during the more golden years of traveling all over the world (I met my wife when I was flying to Paris from NYC), but wouldn't recommend it to anyone now. It has devolved over the years, and, especially now, the airlines and their employees are fighting for their lives through no fault of their own. CEO's met with Meadows in DC this past week, so we'll see if the possibility of another bailout changes the current bleak scenario.

Submitted by svelte on September 22, 2020 - 8:50am.

scaredyclassic wrote:

Dang unions. Providing flyer a good life. No more of that! Capital supreme, labor eat poo.

Not sure if you're implying that was what I was implying. Certainly was not. Or maybe that was just your opinion.

I belonged to a union for several years and made considerably more money that my peers doing essentially the same work. Can't say I miss the union though because it did create a barrier between employees and management. We survived, but I've found a much more lucrative career that didn't require a union.

I've known probably fifty pilots through my neighbors, friends, and customers and noticed a trend early on. Besides all having perfect vision (not a pair of glasses among them - even in old age!), almost every one was a former military pilot. Finally, if the person was over 6 feet, he usually had been a fighter pilot then a commercial airline pilot. If the person was under 6 feet, they had been a military helo pilot then changed careers once they left the military. I can't think of a single exception among the pilots I've met to that.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 22, 2020 - 9:06am.

no. I wasn't implying anything to anyone. I was just ranting. not eve sure what i was saying. Not sure anyoen knows what they're saying anymore. Not sure anything means anything anymore.

i think I was being rudely sarcastic, in response to flyer saying, "everyone should live the life they dream of", after spending a lifetime in a strong union, at the same time period as unions dissolved and were weakened across the country, making the exhortation to lvie your dreams, uncompromised, less possible.

It gave me that young person feeling that boomers like to say pull yourself up by your bootstraps as they pull the ladder up behind them generally sprinkled with a christian I'm blessed/saved edge of righteousness and semi-condescension.

But that's just me, ultimately, being irritable. better go meditate today.

i apologize.

i think evangelicals and u.s. christians are generally opposed to unions, I've been reading. not sure how they got there, but they find support in the bible; striking is somehow stealing, i think, is the argument...so the politcal strength of envandies and union demise go hand in hand.

i really truly am starting to get creeped out by the usa. i know people say it idly, but i would definitely consider leaving if I can find a good plan b...

Submitted by svelte on September 22, 2020 - 5:15pm.

No need for an apology. Things are truly strange right now.

If it makes you feel any better, I'm still convinced things get a little better, a little fairer all the time though sometimes it doesn't feel that way.

I've been doing a lot of reading in old newspaper (they are archived online now and easy to search) and some of the stuff that happened 100 years ago shocks me when I read it, even though I know from history books that things like that happened. The papers reported them like it was no big deal.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 22, 2020 - 8:07pm.

svelte wrote:
No need for an apology. Things are truly strange right now.

If it makes you feel any better, I'm still convinced things get a little better, a little fairer all the time though sometimes it doesn't feel that way.

I've been doing a lot of reading in old newspaper (they are archived online now and easy to search) and some of the stuff that happened 100 years ago shocks me when I read it, even though I know from history books that things like that happened. The papers reported them like it was no big deal.

Cocaine avail. Over the counter. Now...ugh...such a pain to get

Submitted by ucodegen on September 22, 2020 - 9:13pm.

scaredyclassic wrote:
Warning
Jenny Joseph

When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
.
.
.
But maybe I ought to practise a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.


Good poem. I always try to practice a little social convention irreverence now and then. Sometimes it may get me in trouble. One has to enjoy life though.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on September 22, 2020 - 9:31pm.

When we were younger it was me who said awkward things in public but with age its mostly my wife who does it. Ive become fairly normal and shes gotten weirder. Role swap

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