"World Ends, Minorities and Women Hardest Hit."

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Submitted by HungryHippo on March 21, 2009 - 5:08pm

That's what I thought when I saw the following LA Times Business section headline. I'm sure this same cookie cutter article has been written multiple times, whenever there's some type of national economic downturn.

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-bl...

Blacks lose ground in job slump

eporting from Sacramento and Los Angeles -- California's unemployment rate rose for the 11th straight month in February, hitting 10.5% as a recession-racked economy shed a higher-than-expected 116,000 jobs, the state reported Friday.

The rate is up from 10.1% in January and is the highest since April 1983. All but one of 11 industries surveyed lost jobs, with construction the hardest hit. California employers have cut nearly 606,000 workers from their payrolls since February 2008, driving the state jobless rate well above the national rate of 8.1%. The state is far from hitting bottom, analysts said. Slowing growth in Asia bodes ill for California's trade-dependent economy. And a painful wave of cuts is just beginning in the government sector, normally a reliable source of employment, as the state prepares to lay off thousands of teachers and other public servants.

Submitted by EconProf on March 22, 2009 - 4:09pm.

This is really shabby journalism, and is the reason newspapers like the LA Times are increasingly viewed as irrelevant.
First of all the Black/White unemployment has historically been a 2:1 ratio. For a variety of reasons, blacks have fairly consistently had about twice the unemployment rate of whites, whatever the white rate is. The article complains of a 12% rate for blacks with a 8% rate for whites (not sure when measured, or where), which I'd call an improvement over historical norms.
They later state that thousands of teachers and educators are about to get laid off across the state. Reality: every year at about this time school districts mail out scary notices to mobilize their ranks and alarm parents. Come September pretty much everyone gets rehired. It is a political game aided and abetted by the MSM. The fact is, the unemployment rate for teachers is way below that of the private sector.
As Richs' posts have pointed out, the big employment cutbacks in San Diego, mirroring the nation, are in manufacturing, retail, finance, construction, etc.--all private sector. In other words, the taxpayers who support the public sector. In what categories are the jobs growing or stable? Government, education, and health services--all public sector or largely government funded.
I'd wager that the cuts in hours and cuts in pay are also far more common in the taxpaying private sector as well. Let's hear a bit less whining from government workers and the biased media.

Submitted by equalizer on March 23, 2009 - 12:18am.

EconProf wrote:
This is really shabby journalism, and is the reason newspapers like the LA Times are increasingly viewed as irrelevant.
First of all the Black/White unemployment has historically been a 2:1 ratio. For a variety of reasons, blacks have fairly consistently had about twice the unemployment rate of whites, whatever the white rate is. The article complains of a 12% rate for blacks with a 8% rate for whites (not sure when measured, or where), which I'd call an improvement over historical norms.
They later state that thousands of teachers and educators are about to get laid off across the state. Reality: every year at about this time school districts mail out scary notices to mobilize their ranks and alarm parents. Come September pretty much everyone gets rehired. It is a political game aided and abetted by the MSM. The fact is, the unemployment rate for teachers is way below that of the private sector.
As Richs' posts have pointed out, the big employment cutbacks in San Diego, mirroring the nation, are in manufacturing, retail, finance, construction, etc.--all private sector. In other words, the taxpayers who support the public sector. In what categories are the jobs growing or stable? Government, education, and health services--all public sector or largely government funded.
I'd wager that the cuts in hours and cuts in pay are also far more common in the taxpaying private sector as well. Let's hear a bit less whining from government workers and the biased media.

But I though teachers were paid nothing. After the degree was she going to make 120K? Maybe that's why she is getting laid off? School jobs in CA are one of the few professions that are paid much higher than other states compared to doctors and engineers where salary is only slightly more.

"thought she had it made, earning a six-figure salary as a reading and writing specialist. On the side, she was close to finishing work on a doctorate in educational administration at Pepperdine University. Then she got the news that her position was being eliminated because of recession-related budget cuts. If she's lucky enough to land a teaching job back in the classroom -- and that's far from certain -- she would have to take a 40% pay cut."

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