ot. pills I believe in and take religiously...

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Submitted by scaredyclassic on April 27, 2015 - 9:37pm

Fish oil.
Fiber
Vitamin d
oregano oil.
cercumin

Submitted by moneymaker on April 27, 2015 - 9:53pm.

Melatonin to sleep (vivid dreams a plus)
Exedrin for migraines
Use to take DHEA, not so much anymore
Vitamins seem to be useless for me
Flexeril when the back spasm acts up
Tamsulosin when I feel a kidney stone coming
The last two I don't take very often but when I need them they are a life saver.

Submitted by NotCranky on April 27, 2015 - 10:28pm.

I eat a fish oil capsule or two a few times a week , a multi-vite and magnesium zinc supplement but not everyday. I don't believe in any of them.

I run and do other exercise quite a bit and was having calf cramps a lot maybe the magnesium helps, My calf muscles have been great. I doubt it did the trick because I also started running more intelligently, more but more intelligently.

I have a pretty healthy diet. Going to drink Iced green tea this summer with the best honey I can get.

Do you still lift weights , scaredy?

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 27, 2015 - 10:49pm.

At least they're not synthetic drugs. what you're taking, you can also consume in your diet.
Have fish at least one a week. Or make it like Catholics and have fish on Fridays.

Submitted by CA renter on April 28, 2015 - 2:19am.

Blogstar wrote:
I eat a fish oil capsule or two a few times a week , a multi-vite and magnesium zinc supplement but not everyday. I don't believe in any of them.

I run and do other exercise quite a bit and was having calf cramps a lot maybe the magnesium helps, My calf muscles have been great. I doubt it did the trick because I also started running more intelligently, more but more intelligently.

I have a pretty healthy diet. Going to drink Iced green tea this summer with the best honey I can get.

Do you still lift weights , scaredy?

Have you tried eating bananas for cramps, Russ? They've worked amazingly well for me. I believe it's the potassium.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on April 28, 2015 - 6:18am.

1 multivitamin
1 fish Oil
2 D3 (once in the morning and once in the afternoon) (just started doing this, noticing a big difference in how I feel).

I take the D3 because I work in an office all day so never get out in the sun during the week. Should have started this 20 years ago (makes a big difference).

Wife has me eating one apple (or other fruit) a day and at least one serving of Kale a week (in soup).

Figure I should make it to 70 to max out SS if I am lucky LOL.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on April 28, 2015 - 5:56am.

Blogstar wrote:
I eat a fish oil capsule or two a few times a week , a multi-vite and magnesium zinc supplement but not everyday. I don't believe in any of them.

I run and do other exercise quite a bit and was having calf cramps a lot maybe the magnesium helps, My calf muscles have been great. I doubt it did the trick because I also started running more intelligently, more but more intelligently.

I have a pretty healthy diet. Going to drink Iced green tea this summer with the best honey I can get.

Do you still lift weights , scaredy?

no. the krav maga is kind of wearing me out. im not sur eif its dumb or not. i am definitely getting good practice kicking to the crotch. i think moving forward, its probably more important for me to be able to hit people really hard and fast in the face or neck and kick really hard than lift a bit more weight.

priorities..

Submitted by DataAgent on April 28, 2015 - 8:02am.

Glucosamine for healthy bone joints

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 28, 2015 - 9:45am.

The-Shoveler wrote:

Wife has me eating one apple (or other fruit) a day and at least one serving of Kale a week (in soup).

Figure I should make it to 70 to max out SS if I am lucky LOL.

60 is the new 40. I expect to live 100. That will bankrupt SS, haha..

I eat one banana, a whole bunch of fruit, a big salad everyday. A pomegranate including seeds when in season. I also drink 1 fresh coconut per day.

The curcumin/turmeric is really good. I should take it in pill format also. Or use it to marinate chicken.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 28, 2015 - 10:00am.

Nobody mentioned saw palmetto.

I take a pill everyday to prevent BPH prostate enlargement, a problem that 90% of men will suffer.

It's a natural remedy that American Indian used. And it's a prescription in Germany.

What about Gingko?
I take a pill for brain function.
I like Chinese soup with Gingko, Ginseng, and black chicken. It's kinda expensive at the Chinese restaurant. You can make it at home... it's kind of bitter but healthy.

Bone broth is the new trend.
http://wellandgood.com/2014/11/05/why-ne...

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/07/dining...

Submitted by poorgradstudent on April 28, 2015 - 10:57am.

I take fish oil because I really don't care for fish.

I've taken a multivitamin off and on. But for most people a balanced diet provides all the benefits of vitamins. Vegans (and to a lesser degree, vegetarians) do have to worry about certain dietary needs.

....

Ginko is a placebo (except perhaps in those with dementia), but benign (as long as it's actually real Ginko, which is a huge risk with Chinese manufactured "herbal supplements") Of course it shouldn't be taken by those with blood circulation disorders or pregnant women.

Submitted by CA renter on April 28, 2015 - 11:09am.

Daily, I take:

-5,000-10,000 IU of Vitamin D3
-1 multivitamin
-1 Ultimate Eye Formula from Sprouts (it works!)

I take the following about 2-5 times per week:

-1000 mg Fish Oil
-IP6, which has the potential to prevent, reduce or reverse tumor growth

http://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatmen...

Submitted by fun4vnay2 on April 28, 2015 - 11:36am.

I take nothing :-( though I try to eat healthy and try to exercise regularly: both weights and cardio..

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 28, 2015 - 11:53am.

poorgradstudent wrote:

Ginko is a placebo (except perhaps in those with dementia), but benign (as long as it's actually real Ginko, which is a huge risk with Chinese manufactured "herbal supplements") Of course it shouldn't be taken by those with blood circulation disorders or pregnant women.

Very interesting.

Of course, if you don't have dementia then taking ginkgo won't make you smarter. but it does increase blood flow, so I guess I don't need to take low dose aspirin. For sure, I would avoid made in China supplements.

I think I need to learn a foreign language to exercise my brain and delay the onset of Alzheimer's. Maybe playing poker.

Submitted by carlsbadworker on April 28, 2015 - 2:55pm.

Fish oil...and that's it.

The issue with taking any pill, is that it affects the metrics but you don't really know if it affects your health. Say, fish oil helps cholesterol, but you don't really know if cholesterol is really doing anything for you personally. It is all based on statistics and there are no personalized medical advice. In addition, we don't even know that many-made pill has any effect compared to what your body generated.

So it is all placebo.

Submitted by carlsbadworker on April 28, 2015 - 2:53pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:
At least they're not synthetic drugs. what you're taking, you can also consume in your diet.
Have fish at least one a week. Or make it like Catholics and have fish on Fridays.

Well, pollution, ever heard about that? Where do you get healthy fish anymore?

Submitted by carlsbadworker on April 28, 2015 - 3:02pm.

rockingtime wrote:
I take nothing :-( though I try to eat healthy and try to exercise regularly: both weights and cardio..

That's pretty good.

Old wisdom says business strives when it solves people's pain. But when I look at the drug and supplementary market, I see it as a complete lie. How many people are taking pain killers v.s. fish oil/vitamin? We spent more money to make us feel good than to avoid pains...gym membership fee included. Heck, even the lawyer that is known for getting pains whenever he spends money, is now buying life insurance. :-)

Submitted by The-Shoveler on April 28, 2015 - 4:25pm.

Placebo or no I am sticking with my D3 At least until I can walk on the beach everyday in the sun.

Submitted by SK in CV on April 28, 2015 - 6:26pm.

I'm always surprised when one who identifies as an atheist uses the phrase "I believe". At its core, it's a religious phrase.

Scientific studies have shown little benefit to regular intake of fish oil. Fiber, in balance with other dietary intake, has been shown to be beneficial. Vitamin D is a necessity. No peer reviewed studies show an significant benefit to oregano oil or turmeric over other similar herbs.

Interesting timing on this. My daughter just posted a quote on facebook from someone named Tim Minchen (confession: I have no idea who he his.)

"Do you know what they call alternative medicine that’s been proven to work? Medicine."

Submitted by scaredyclassic on April 28, 2015 - 7:55pm.

SK in CV wrote:
I'm always surprised when one who identifies as an atheist uses the phrase "I believe". At its core, it's a religious phrase.

Scientific studies have shown little benefit to regular intake of fish oil. Fiber, in balance with other dietary intake, has been shown to be beneficial. Vitamin D is a necessity. No peer reviewed studies show an significant benefit to oregano oil or turmeric over other similar herbs.

Interesting timing on this. My daughter just posted a quote on facebook from someone named Tim Minchen (confession: I have no idea who he his.)

"Do you know what they call alternative medicine that’s been proven to work? Medicine."

placccebo is real, Gd or pill

Submitted by bzribee on April 28, 2015 - 11:48pm.

Red Foxx said, "Won't those health food nuts feel silly one day, lying in bed, dying of nothing."

I love that quote.

I take supplements that have helped over the years. I also read the current research, and don't buy any product not assayed (? fun word) by ConsumerLab.com ($15/year membership, well worth it IMHO).

Fish Oil (on weeks I don't have 2-3 servings of salmon--Trader Joe's has a great frozen salmon meal.)
Echinacea (when I"m around runny nosed kids)

Daily:
Vit D (but not as much as I used to)
Calcium (also not as much as I used to)
Lutein

I'm considering CoQ10 and/or Vitamin K but have reading to do--can't remember why I thought they'd be good!

CoQ10 really helps family members who take statins--shown scientifically, so therefore it's now medicine, right?

BTW, EWG (Environmental Working Group) says farmed salmon from Chile, Canada and the US are best of available choices. They like wild but say some wild salmon have more pesticides than farmed. They're the fine folks who brought us the Dirty/Clean Dozen (produce) and the sunscreen/cosmetics ratings.

Submitted by flyer on April 29, 2015 - 5:56am.

Per this discussion on health, here are some excerpts from an interesting article a friend forwarded to me.

This is not meant to be advice, but, personally, I feel a peaceful mind leads to a healthy body, and a great life, so I just thought I'd pass some of these thoughts along. (Agree getting that D3 running at the beach doesn't hurt either.)

CALM YOUR MIND--HEAL YOUR BODY
Mark Hyman, MD

"WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR HEALTH, there is one factor that is more important than almost any other…

If it is missing from your life, it causes or worsens 95 percent of all illness. It has been associated with dramatic reductions in disease and increased longevity.

And it is more important than cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure, or any other risk factor in determining whether you will live a long and healthy life. But it doesn’t come in a pill, and it can’t be found in a hospital or in your doctor’s office.

What is this critical factor that determines so much about how healthy or how sick you are?

It may seem simplistic, but aside from eating breakfast, the biggest predictor of longevity is psychological resiliency–-and being able to roll with the punches that life throws at us.

We’ve known about this in medicine for a long time. I was recently browsing through my library and found an old book that I read in college called Mind as Healer, Mind as Slayer, written by a friend and leader in the field of mind/body medicine, Kenneth Pelletier. He is a clinical professor of medicine at the medical schools of the University of California, San Francisco and the University of Arizona.

His book was published in 1977. I wish I could say that a lot has changed since that book was published. Sure, we have filled in the gaps and learned more about the mechanisms through which the body affects the mind and the mind affects the body, but the basic truths remain the same.

There is a dramatic and powerful connection between your mind and body, and between your body and your mind. In fact, it really should not be called a connection because it is just ONE bidirectional system.

Unfortunately, few doctors accept or understand this fundamental reality about biology. So, in most doctors’ offices, you aren’t going to learn about the connection between your body and brain.

According to Hans Selye, MD, the man who coined the word “stress” and first mapped out its biological effects, “The modern physician should know as much about emotions and thoughts as about disease symptoms and drugs. This approach would appear to hold more promise of cure than anything medicine has given us to date.” Selye’s words are as true today as they were on the day he wrote them.

We are seeing an epidemic of stress-related disorders in our society, including depression, anxiety, autism, attention deficit disorder, memory disorders, and dementia, and these disorders are making the pharmaceutical industry highly profitable.

You see, Americans live on caffeine and Prozac. We use substances to manage our moods. In fact, the four top-selling items in grocery stores are all drugs that we use to manage our mood and energy: caffeine, sugar, alcohol, and nicotine.

But how do we really deal with the root of this problem? You use the MOST powerful pharmacy in the world — which is right between your ears."

Submitted by scaredyclassic on April 29, 2015 - 6:24am.

flyer wrote:
Per this discussion on health, here are some excerpts from an interesting article a friend forwarded to me.

This is not meant to be advice, but, personally, I feel a peaceful mind leads to a healthy body, and a great life, so I just thought I'd pass some of these thoughts along. (Agree getting that D3 running at the beach doesn't hurt either.)

CALM YOUR MIND--HEAL YOUR BODY
Mark Hyman, MD

"WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR HEALTH, there is one factor that is more important than almost any other…

If it is missing from your life, it causes or worsens 95 percent of all illness. It has been associated with dramatic reductions in disease and increased longevity.

And it is more important than cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure, or any other risk factor in determining whether you will live a long and healthy life. But it doesn’t come in a pill, and it can’t be found in a hospital or in your doctor’s office.

What is this critical factor that determines so much about how healthy or how sick you are?

It may seem simplistic, but aside from eating breakfast, the biggest predictor of longevity is psychological resiliency–-and being able to roll with the punches that life throws at us.

We’ve known about this in medicine for a long time. I was recently browsing through my library and found an old book that I read in college called Mind as Healer, Mind as Slayer, written by a friend and leader in the field of mind/body medicine, Kenneth Pelletier. He is a clinical professor of medicine at the medical schools of the University of California, San Francisco and the University of Arizona.

His book was published in 1977. I wish I could say that a lot has changed since that book was published. Sure, we have filled in the gaps and learned more about the mechanisms through which the body affects the mind and the mind affects the body, but the basic truths remain the same.

There is a dramatic and powerful connection between your mind and body, and between your body and your mind. In fact, it really should not be called a connection because it is just ONE bidirectional system.

Unfortunately, few doctors accept or understand this fundamental reality about biology. So, in most doctors’ offices, you aren’t going to learn about the connection between your body and brain.

According to Hans Selye, MD, the man who coined the word “stress” and first mapped out its biological effects, “The modern physician should know as much about emotions and thoughts as about disease symptoms and drugs. This approach would appear to hold more promise of cure than anything medicine has given us to date.” Selye’s words are as true today as they were on the day he wrote them.

We are seeing an epidemic of stress-related disorders in our society, including depression, anxiety, autism, attention deficit disorder, memory disorders, and dementia, and these disorders are making the pharmaceutical industry highly profitable.

You see, Americans live on caffeine and Prozac. We use substances to manage our moods. In fact, the four top-selling items in grocery stores are all drugs that we use to manage our mood and energy: caffeine, sugar, alcohol, and nicotine.

But how do we really deal with the root of this problem? You use the MOST powerful pharmacy in the world — which is right between your ears."

yes.

i also truly believe in th ehealing power of fasting which has roots in many religions. simply doing nothing. not thinking, not eating is probably in the final analysis better than doing something.

Submitted by moneymaker on April 29, 2015 - 6:56am.

Agree that fasting is good but I don't think the mind can heal the body, do believe that the body can heal itself better than we can. The immune system is very powerful and just needs a push in the right direction sometimes. Hormones are also very powerful but usually have side effects.

Submitted by NotCranky on April 29, 2015 - 7:09am.

Peace and happiness are all good but I don't see many 80 year olds who are doing great physically who didn't either eat pretty well all their lives or make pretty major changes as they progressed in years.

The brain rules, but the best injestible medicine with broadest influence on human health is still high quality nutrient dense food.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 29, 2015 - 10:00am.

Blogstar wrote:
Peace and happiness are all good but I don't see many 80 year olds who are doing great physically who didn't either eat pretty well all their lives or make pretty major changes as they progressed in years.

The brain rules, but the best injestible medicine with broadest influence on human health is still high quality nutrient dense food.

That's pretty much it.

Plus food is not medicine, food is culture and intuition.

Nutrition is medicine but still in its infancy. Sports nutrition works but that won't lead to longevity. More likely shortened lives.

Medicine as we know it is about fixing sick people, not about keeping people healthy from young age.

My aunt (dad's older sister) is 94. She has no kids so we relatives help drive her places. She's not been to the doctor's in 2 years (won't go). She says there's no need to cost Medicare money if there's nothing that ails. No pain or anything bothering her. That's pretty admirable.

I have another aunt (dad's cousin) who's 100 and lives with her unmarried daughter. Still runs up and down the stairs.

My dad is 85 and mom is 75.

For me, it started off as wanting to stay young and goodlooking. That lead to more research and lifestyle change. Doctor wanted to put dad on high blood pressure and cholesterol meds. I told him to change his eating habits which he did.

From observing people, you can pretty much deduce what healthy habits are. My older brother married a southern girl. The comfort food has made him fat. He's pretty suborn and won't change. Plus the wife enjoys fattening him up so he resembles her family. I don't expect him to live past 75. He says he's OK with that.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 29, 2015 - 10:44am.

he is a clinical professor of medicine at the medical schools of the University of California, San Francisco and the University of Arizona.

From my interaction with doctors, I find that, yes, doctors know their craft. But they don't necessarily put the whole body of medicine into practice.

Doctors like to intervene in their areas of expertize.

For example some old buildings are left to decay and when there's a leak, you fix it. Tear out the drywall, intervene and fix, whatever it takes. The best thing would be to maintain the building properly as time goes by.

The dermato who cut out my skin is one of the best. Great schooling, etc... but he hardly looked healthy. I'm sure he's excellent at fixing skin cancer, but I have doubts about overall health.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 29, 2015 - 11:38am.

Oh, there's a lot of discrimination against healthy people.

You can say you worked really hard to become a millionaire or you worked really hard to become an elite soldier. But say you choose your food carefully and suddenly you're small minded and vain (but you can say you choose your food to be an athlete or body builder).

So, in real life, I elect to fly under the radar and say that my good health is just luck. I was blessed by God with good genes.

Submitted by flyer on April 29, 2015 - 4:51pm.

I agree that good health, which may give us the ability to live longer and enjoy life more is definitely a combination of good genes, a healthy lifestyle, (diet, nutrition, exercise) and a positive attitude (including minimizing stress)--hence the premise of the mind-body connection as mentioned.

Personally, I also believe that, at the core of the matter, you need to feel you have a purpose or a variety of reasons for living--whatever they may mean to each person--and imo, that is the engine that drives the other aspects.

Our family and extended family (including parents and grandparents) have pretty much operated on those premises for as long as I can remember--and since most of them (even the ones who received a serious diagnosis at some point) all looked at least 10 years younger than their ages (without intervention) and ended up living long and fulfilling lives--we're just trying to follow their great examples.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on April 29, 2015 - 6:13pm.

i wonder what my special purpose is for being here.

maybe some of you remember steve martin in the jerk discovering what his "special purpose" was....man that was a funny movie...

i guess my purpose is to kick ass and be awesome.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on April 29, 2015 - 6:14pm.

i think my dad woulda lived longer if he werent so stressed out.

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