OT: New Spin on Home Invasion

User Forum Topic
Submitted by njtosd on September 8, 2016 - 10:57am

For those with kids on high school, the following is a description of an event that happened last Sunday around the corner from us. I have deleted details, although I don't think it's terribly private as this was posted on a relatively public forum already:

`````````````
On Sunday night, 80~100 teenagers showed up uninvited at our house after someone deliberately placed a fictitious ad via social medial identifying our house as a high school party location. My daughter was home with 2 other girls at the time and a group of 9 unknown teens climbed over our locked side gate and barged through our unlocked door to the kitchen. While she was confronting them and trying to get them out, more high schoolers started to show up from other entrances. As my daughter/friends went to guard the front gate, and made their best effort to turn people away, more got in by climbing over our side gate and backyard. Many brought in alcohol, and ransacked our house while my daughter and her friends were completely helpless and defenseless. The crowds were finally disbursed when police showed up around 11pm. Fortunately no one was injured but my house was badly vandalized, furniture damaged and items/jewelery were stolen. I apologize for the disturbance this has caused our neighbors on the street and bless the hearts to those kids who stayed hours after to help with cleanup. This apparently happened to several other neighbors before, but I hope won't happen to anyone else!
````````````````
Most alarm systems have a panic button but we neglected, up until now, to teach our kids to use it. To me, it seems as though the people who came barging in were the ones who placed the fictitious party ad. I haven't found out yet whether these kids were known to the girls who were home - I assume at least tangentially. Really hard to believe.

Submitted by harvey on September 8, 2016 - 5:08pm.

They shoulda called officer barrel roll.

Submitted by moneymaker on September 8, 2016 - 5:36pm.

A few cameras might be appropriate as I don't know if I would believe the teenage girls story or not, in any case cameras that record would have shed some light on the truth.

Submitted by njtosd on September 8, 2016 - 6:55pm.

moneymaker wrote:
A few cameras might be appropriate as I don't know if I would believe the teenage girls story or not, in any case cameras that record would have shed some light on the truth.

Cameras - yes. I don't think this girl is the type (for many reasons) but you never know. It reminds me a bit of the scam in big cities where one person confuses you (stuck in revolving door, trips and runs into you, etc) while the other tries to steal your wallet, phone, etc.

Submitted by ltsddd on September 8, 2016 - 8:09pm.

mm has a good point. Unless these 80-100 kids were all ninjas, I would expect someone else in the 'hood would have seen or heard them.

Submitted by njtosd on September 8, 2016 - 8:19pm.

ltsdd wrote:
mm has a good point. Unless these 80-100 kids were all ninjas, I would expect someone else in the 'hood would have seen or heard them.

We saw it, we just didn't realize what was going on.

Submitted by no_such_reality on September 9, 2016 - 9:39am.

So a teenage girl is home with a couple girlfriends while the parents are away (I'm assume not just out for the night ) and the unknown robbers post a party plan to rob the place getting lucky (or more likely knowing from school contact) that just the girls are there and in the confusion rob the place

Of the girls invite some friends over for a party, one dumb dumb posts it, it gets out of hand and someone opportunistically steals valuables.

Submitted by svelte on September 9, 2016 - 12:25pm.

njtosd wrote:
... Many brought in alcohol, and ransacked our house while my daughter and her friends were completely helpless and defenseless. ...

I must have missed the part where the uninvited guests also stole their daughter's cell phone so she couldn't call 911, and blocked her path to the neighbor's house so she couldn't get help next door.

Don't doubt there were uninvited guests. Do doubt the amount of resistance that was put up.

And if it had happened to several other neighbors before, why hadn't they talked to their kids about the appropriate response should it happen to them?

Submitted by poorgradstudent on September 9, 2016 - 4:00pm.

no_such_reality wrote:
So a teenage girl is home with a couple girlfriends while the parents are away (I'm assume not just out for the night ) and the unknown robbers post a party plan to rob the place getting lucky (or more likely knowing from school contact) that just the girls are there and in the confusion rob the place

Of the girls invite some friends over for a party, one dumb dumb posts it, it gets out of hand and someone opportunistically steals valuables.

Yeah, it's really easy for a party to snowball. She tells two friends, then she tells two friends, then she tells two friends...

Otherwise this is an awesome prank.

Submitted by ucodegen on September 9, 2016 - 5:38pm.

Why didn't the girls call police when the first few forced their way in? Call police, then your daughter and friends should have started taking pictures.

Then hand the pictures to the police and let them track the people down. If one of the people there was the person who set it all up - then there would be leads...

Personally, I think one of the girls thought it would be 'fun', but it quickly got out of hand. This is probably why the delay in the police. I think they would have immediately called if the forceful entry was a complete surprise.

I vote for video security system - hide the controller and hard drives that the system uses (don't use attic because the heat damages electronic hardware)

Submitted by njtosd on September 9, 2016 - 10:39pm.

svelte wrote:
njtosd wrote:
... Many brought in alcohol, and ransacked our house while my daughter and her friends were completely helpless and defenseless. ...

I must have missed the part where the uninvited guests also stole their daughter's cell phone so she couldn't call 911, and blocked her path to the neighbor's house so she couldn't get help next door.

Don't doubt there were uninvited guests. Do doubt the amount of resistance that was put up.

And if it had happened to several other neighbors before, why hadn't they talked to their kids about the appropriate response should it happen to them?

No one said they didn't call 911, nor do I have any info about how long it took police to get there. My guess is that it was not very fast. I personally had not heard of anything like this before.

Submitted by njtosd on September 9, 2016 - 10:45pm.

ucodegen wrote:
Why didn't the girls call police when the first few forced their way in? Call police, then your daughter and friends should have started taking pictures.

Then hand the pictures to the police and let them track the people down. If one of the people there was the person who set it all up - then there would be leads...

Personally, I think one of the girls thought it would be 'fun', but it quickly got out of hand. This is probably why the delay in the police. I think they would have immediately called if the forceful entry was a complete surprise.

I vote for video security system - hide the controller and hard drives that the system uses (don't use attic because the heat damages electronic hardware)

1. This was not my daughter. I met only one of the girls years ago. If they are juveniles we won't get much more info, but I will try.
2. Who said police were delayed or that the girls didn't call right away? There is an ongoing problem of slow response, btw.

Submitted by svelte on September 10, 2016 - 6:24am.

njtosd wrote:
svelte wrote:
njtosd wrote:
... Many brought in alcohol, and ransacked our house while my daughter and her friends were completely helpless and defenseless. ...

I must have missed the part where the uninvited guests also stole their daughter's cell phone so she couldn't call 911, and blocked her path to the neighbor's house so she couldn't get help next door.

Don't doubt there were uninvited guests. Do doubt the amount of resistance that was put up.

And if it had happened to several other neighbors before, why hadn't they talked to their kids about the appropriate response should it happen to them?

No one said they didn't call 911, nor do I have any info about how long it took police to get there. My guess is that it was not very fast. I personally had not heard of anything like this before.

What city was this in?

If someone calls 911 stating intruders are ransacking their house and the police don't arrive in under 5 minutes, then you need to have a talk with your local police department and hit all the news stations with the story.

Submitted by svelte on September 10, 2016 - 8:07am.

njtosd wrote:
I personally had not heard of anything like this before.

Risky Business
Sixteen Candles
Project X
American Pie
Superbad
House Party

Teen house parties going amuck while the parents are away were in all of those movies. Maybe word of mouth didn't spread via craigslist/facebook/twitter, but there have always been ways to spread it.

When I had teens at home and my wife and I were going to be away for the evening or weekend, I would go talk to the neighbors and explain that we were leaving a teen alone and that if ANY strange cars/people came by the house, to give us a call. So I knew about the possibilities even back then. We didn't want to come back and find Animal House in our living room.

Submitted by harvey on September 10, 2016 - 9:20am.

Call 911 and there's a good possibility that you'll be cleaning blood off your kitchen floor, your kid will be attending a classmate's funeral, and a cop or two will get some extra paid vacation.

I teach my kids to never call 911 un less it's a matter of life and death.

Submitted by svelte on September 10, 2016 - 11:13am.

harvey wrote:
Call 911 and there's a good possibility that you'll be cleaning blood off your kitchen floor, your kid will be attending a classmate's funeral, and a cop or two will get some extra paid vacation.

I teach my kids to never call 911 un less it's a matter of life and death.

Odds of that seem low - compare the number of police shootings versus the number of calls they respond to.

If there are lunatics breaking into my house and trashing it, you betcha I'm gonna call 911.

Submitted by zk on September 10, 2016 - 11:54am.

harvey wrote:
Call 911 and there's a good possibility that you'll be cleaning blood off your kitchen floor, your kid will be attending a classmate's funeral, and a cop or two will get some extra paid vacation.

I teach my kids to never call 911 un less it's a matter of life and death.

That kind of paranoia is similar to (and as dangerous as) the paranoia on the right about ebola, sharia law, mexican rapists, etc.

Submitted by harvey on September 10, 2016 - 2:15pm.

lol, paranoia.

The comment wasn't wholly serious.

Calling the police may make a situation better, it may make it worse. Once the cops arrive, they are in control. They can handle the situation however they want. And if you don't like the outcome determined entirely by officer Imadick or officer Ihadabadday, tough luck.

It would take no more than two non-cop adults to clear a house full of partying teenagers. And it can be done without your kid and/or their friends ending up with a criminal record, or worse.

Call the neighbors, not the cops.

Submitted by njtosd on September 10, 2016 - 4:15pm.

svelte wrote:
njtosd wrote:
I personally had not heard of anything like this before.

Risky Business
Sixteen Candles
Project X
American Pie
Superbad
House Party

Teen house parties going amuck while the parents are away were in all of those movies. Maybe word of mouth didn't spread via craigslist/facebook/twitter, but there have always been ways to spread it.

When I had teens at home and my wife and I were going to be away for the evening or weekend, I would go talk to the neighbors and explain that we were leaving a teen alone and that if ANY strange cars/people came by the house, to give us a call. So I knew about the possibilities even back then. We didn't want to come back and find Animal House in our living room.

Yes, obviously, I've seen movies about this. You don't think movies are real life, though, do you? Most here seem determined that this girl or her friends had something to do with it. Perhaps that is the case, and I am still trying to find this out, but this would probably be one of the last types of kids I would expect this from. Naturally, I wouldn't have posted it if I thought that were the case (in fact, that scenario happened next door a few years ago and it was clear what was going on).

Submitted by njtosd on September 10, 2016 - 10:00pm.

svelte wrote:

What city was this in?

If someone calls 911 stating intruders are ransacking their house and the police don't arrive in under 5 minutes, then you need to have a talk with your local police department and hit all the news stations with the story.

Carmel Valley. And yes - there have been a fair number of complaints about slow response times.

Submitted by ucodegen on September 12, 2016 - 1:57am.

njtosd wrote:

2. Who said police were delayed or that the girls didn't call right away? There is an ongoing problem of slow response, btw.
Where was this? In San Diego, I know how to get about 5min response on non-critical - much less if critical.

Sorry, just noticed - Carmel Valley... did they go through 911? That path is slow (can be over 15 min just to get on). The technique I use is to know the dispatch numbers (programmed into phone - they are regional). When I call, I have already planned what I am going to say - the people @ dispatch are really busy and are in no mood for 'discussions' or extracting info from a confused person.

Soon as I get an answer:
My Name, phone number. - they don't have access to the GPRS data that 911 has.
Location - as detailed as possible. If not sure where, but have a smart phone - get the GPS position within 4 to 5 digits past the decimal point before you call. That is accurate to within 30 feet. If you have a dumb phone and are 'lost' - call 911, not dispatch. They can get GPS from the GPRS data stream provided by the phone on a 911 call.
Nature of problem - Be accurate, no drama.
What I feel is needed and one sentence of why.
NOTE: I must also repeat - when talking to dispatch - No Drama. They don't have time for it.

Sometimes it ends there, sometimes they have additional questions... but the whole conversation is very short. I think the longest was just over 1 minute. I think I have had to do this about 3 or 4 times. Shortest response near Mira Mesa was about 3 min, longest was just over 10 (Officer got a little lost).

I know that you are 'supposed' to use 911 for emergencies instead of Dispatch - however, I have found Dispatch to be much quicker, and they can cross call to Fire and Ambulance. Just remember - you are talking to a Police Officer, not a Social Worker. No Drama, No Exaggerations, Nothing But the Facts(Dragnet).

Submitted by ucodegen on September 12, 2016 - 2:04am.

harvey wrote:

It would take no more than two non-cop adults to clear a house full of partying teenagers. And it can be done without your kid and/or their friends ending up with a criminal record, or worse.

Not from what I have seen. Depends upon the age, and size. You are throwing 2 adults against over 100 teens. Are some of them members of the HS Football Team? Are you a parent? Are your children teenagers - particularly late teen? If you are, you would know how difficult it can be for just one parent to deal with one teen, let alone 100 operating with 'group-think' and diffusion of responsibility.

Remember that these 'kids' committed forceable entry - technically B&E, misdemeanor to felony vandalism, theft, and underage drinking.

If the individuals were under 18 at time of offense, their record gets sealed at 18. With some of them, meeting police may wake them up.

Submitted by ucodegen on September 12, 2016 - 2:06am.

njtosd wrote:
Yes, obviously, I've seen movies about this. You don't think movies are real life, though, do you? Most here seem determined that this girl or her friends had something to do with it.

I grew up in a real nice neighborhood, and I knew about these word of mouth parties when parents are out - this was in the late 70's.

Submitted by harvey on September 12, 2016 - 7:09am.

So now it's 100 belligerent football players? This party gets bigger with every post.

If a couple of adults can't take control of the situation, what do you think the cops are going to do when they show up?

Quote:
Remember that these 'kids' committed forceable entry - technically B&E, misdemeanor to felony vandalism, theft, and underage drinking.

Yep, and you just called the cops on them.

Quote:
If the individuals were under 18 at time of offense, their record gets sealed at 18. With some of them, meeting police may wake them up.

How many seventeen-year-old felons are going to get into college? The justice system will easily make a mess of their lives. Once the cuffs go on - and cops always arrest - their life is going to be a mess.

Two adults could clear the house without the potential overreaction that the cops would bring. Just use some leadership: find a few responsible kids in the group that know they've crossed the line, make it clear that calling the cops will show up if don't comply, divide and conquer, delegate...

Or call the cops and let them decide what happens in your home.

Quote:
Are your children teenagers - particularly late teen?

Sounds like you are. Remember, if there's 100 kids at that party there's a good chance one of them could be yours. When the cops start arresting everyone (and they will, I've seen it happen) one of the kids with a criminal record will may be yours. It doesn't matter if they are committed a felony or not, maybe they just followed their friends into the front door.

Now where's that thread about how hard it is to get into a UC school?

I'll stand by my position and what I teach my kids: Cops almost never make a situation better. These days, they often make it far worse.

Submitted by spdrun on September 12, 2016 - 9:36am.

^^^
Exactly.

As far as those kinds of parties, didn't most people have AOL in the 90s growing up? Random parties got advertised via AOL messages or just by people calling each other/talking in person.

Word got around even before Facebook/Snapchat/Whatsapp.

Submitted by treehugger on September 12, 2016 - 4:13pm.

This happened to my neighbors a few years ago. Parents went out to dinner and told 15 year old daughter she could have some friends over "un-chaperoned". Word went out on social media and it was massive number of kids showed up. Another neighbor called the parents, the response was, "oh, it is ok, we told her she could have a party, mind your own business".

Girl called the cops on her own party, some other neighbors may have called cops also, but no one ever admitted it. We stood in our driveway and watched cops herd huge numbers of kids outta that house....cars were parked up and down the street and kids were piling in, pretty sure there was drinking and drunk driving going on. Cops were not stopping kids AT ALL, just getting them the hell outta our neighborhood. I think there were several hundred kids, craziest thing I have ever seen.

Last year different neighbor girl had her 16th bday party. They are Mormon and "not supposed to drink" another neighbor stood out front with her English Mastiff and if she saw kids coming in with alcohol or looking suspicious she wouldn't let them in, it was magnificent! She actually was able to stop the brother of the girl that had the outta control party trying to bust into the party with arm loads of alcohol.

Submitted by spdrun on September 12, 2016 - 5:56pm.

Cops did the right thing in not stopping drinkers (less so about drunk drivers) and sticking them with fines and records. In most civilized places, drinking age is 16 or 18, as it should be in the US.

Mormons? One step below Wahhabe fanatics in my book. I'd rather live on the South Side of Chicago than in an area infested by them. Nice, clean, polite, and abstemious, till you get into the history.

Until they had a divine revelation in the 1970s, people of color were "cursed" in their Book.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.