OT: i hate to travel. Odd?

User Forum Topic
Submitted by Coronita on July 19, 2016 - 5:59am

I sometimes feel I'm like the only one in the world that doesn't get all giggly to travel.

I mean, I don't mind going somewhere out of the country. But unless it was for the benefit of the family to broaden their experience and enjoyment, I wouldn't really care about going to Europe, Asia, or anywhere else for that matter out of the U.S.. It doesn't tickle me fancy.

Maybe the german autobahn, maybe Switzerland in the winter for some skiing, but how's that different from say Jackson Hole or Whistler? I do hope space travel will be affordable in my lifetime, but I'm still waiting for that.

This came up at a lunchtime conversation in which I was asked, if I could go anywhere in the world, where would I want to go visit? I was dead silent for a few minutes and had to make up something....

Anyway, I've come to the conclusion that I'm boring. And that it's probably a good thing that I'm not retired, because I would be bored out of my mind.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on July 19, 2016 - 6:29am.

I am Boring too LOL.

I did have the travel bug when I was younger (and I did do quite a bit of traveling mostly for Biz), but now days I don't have the urge.

My Wife may force me to travel though so it looks like I am going regardless LOL.

Me I think I could be happy spending retirement just walking on OC and SD beaches a few times a week.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on July 19, 2016 - 6:47am.

i start to disintegrate outside of a 60 mile radius. i also vastly prefer vanilla ice cream. i thrive on regular routine. i detest travelling or visiting new places unless i can get home the same day. willing to hike or bike new trails.

Submitted by moneymaker on July 19, 2016 - 7:23am.

Think traveling is really like a bug in that once you start doing it you broaden your perspective and begin to think a little differently. Though always good to return home I find myself thinking about going somewhere else again right after getting home. Not having traveled in a while now it is out of my system and am happy to stay home.

Submitted by no_such_reality on July 19, 2016 - 9:47am.

I'm bipolar on travel.

I love being new places.

Hate the experience of getting there.

With a elementary age child, the airports are akin to a root canal. SNA airport still literally is bribing passengers off almost any flight. LAX is LAX.

The Train is a pipe dream making air travel look cheap, not to mention timely. Not really interested in going to the grand canyon and having to disembark at 4AM.

Which leaves the car... and California seems to be the land of perpetual traffic jam anywhere were the population exceeds 12.

Next up a ship.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on July 19, 2016 - 11:45am.

I love to travel, but no more standard touristy stuff for me.
I don't have time now, but in the future I will travel and stay for weeks at a time in Airbnb rental.

Submitted by spdrun on July 19, 2016 - 2:54pm.

Aren't they supposed to re-open CLD airport to commercial flights? Yeah, SNA has problems -- runway is very short, no space for expansion. So aircraft have to take off light in hot or windy weather. Meaning either a lower pax load, or a lower fuel load and a stop in ONT to refuel.

Submitted by flyer on July 19, 2016 - 2:59pm.

Loved traveling all over when we were younger, but now we most enjoy staying for extended periods of time with friends and family when we travel.

Like many of you, we really enjoy our home and lifestyle in CA, and probably prefer that overall.

Submitted by XBoxBoy on July 19, 2016 - 4:04pm.

Traveling is highly overrated. You have to schlep a bunch of stuff, sit for extended time in a large tin can, and deal with surly airport staff. Alternatively, you can have a wonderful day in San Diego, enjoy the comforts of your own home and end the day in your own bed. Why do I want to go somewhere else and sleep in a bed where who know who has done who knows what?

Submitted by spdrun on July 19, 2016 - 4:14pm.

dupe delete

Submitted by spdrun on July 19, 2016 - 4:13pm.

Other than when traveling for business with tools/equipment, I haven't checked a bag in years. Unless I'm going to the Klondike, there will probably be a way to do laundry once a week or so.

Submitted by carlsbadworker on July 19, 2016 - 5:04pm.

flu wrote:
Maybe the german autobahn, maybe Switzerland in the winter for some skiing, but how's that different from say Jackson Hole or Whistler?

It's the culture part. How people live differently around the world and taste different kinds of food. (Ethnic food in US is always Americanized)

flu wrote:
And that it's probably a good thing that I'm not retired, because I would be bored out of my mind.

I agree here. I couldn't imagine retirement. What is that I want to do years from now that is so important that I shouldn't do it today?

Submitted by spdrun on July 19, 2016 - 5:07pm.

(Ethnic food in US is always Americanized)

Not always. But you have to go to an area that's populated by recent immigrants from $country to get the good stuff.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on July 19, 2016 - 6:42pm.

"alan bennett describes in one of his journals how, during a visit to egypt, he found himself trapped among cohorts of tourists trudging wearily though dusty wastes of sand and rocks under a merciless sun: the famous,site he had come to admire looked merely like a,stone quarry full of sweaty crowds. he wondered if tourism was not like pornography: a desperate search for lost sensations. the fact is, the only impressions that truly register on our sensibilities are accidental--we did not seek them out (let alone book an organised tour!"

simon leys, THE HALLS OF USELESSNESS, P.488.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on July 19, 2016 - 6:47pm.

I like to travel because I like steet life and public transport. Outside of NYC America is boring.

Food wise, I like Anthony Bourdain. I like do try out things.

I like to rent people's homes to get the local experience. But there are downsides. Overseas, people often don't have central AC.

For physical comfort, I do like my own apartment the best because I have everything arranged the way I like it.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on July 19, 2016 - 6:53pm.

scaredyclassic wrote:
"alan bennett describes in one of his journals how, during a visit to egypt, he found himself trapped among cohorts of tourists trudging wearily though dusty wastes of sand and rocks under a merciless sun: the famous,site he had come to admire looked merely like a,stone quarry full of sweaty crowds. he wondered if tourism was not like pornography: a desperate search for lost sensations. the fact is, the only impressions that truly register on our sensibilities are accidental--we did not seek them out (let alone book an organised tour!"

simon leys, THE HALLS OF USELESSNESS, P.488.

Love your musings scaredy. So true. Look at facebook. People all take selfies at the same sites.

Submitted by spdrun on July 19, 2016 - 7:45pm.

FlyerInHI: Plenty of non-boring parts of the US. You just have to venture off the beaten path and not only go where everyone else is going.

Submitted by flyer on July 19, 2016 - 11:46pm.

Visiting friends and family (many happen to live in very interesting places) is the only time travel appeals to us now, and I agree that retiring from the rat race is one thing, but retiring from life would be extremely boring at any age.

We plan to stay involved in multiple challenging projects (film, real estate, investment, etc., etc.) as well as with kids and grandchildren for as long as we're breathing, and most people we know feel the same.

One of our neighbors is in his late 60's--holds multiple patents--and is still working on others. We honestly don't know anyone who is completely "retired," regardless of their age or financial status.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on July 20, 2016 - 8:52am.

sex tourism.
adventure tourism.
tour groups that visit gang territory in l.a.
war tourism.
poverty tourism.
club med tourism.
pilgrimages.

what have i missed?

Submitted by svelte on July 20, 2016 - 6:30pm.

We enjoy traveling up to a week a month. If it starts going north of that, we start dreading it.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on July 20, 2016 - 11:00pm.

so 7 days.
you kill a day getting there and back.
5 days.
minus a day to recover.
4 days.
and probablt about a day of planning.
3 days.
you get sick or tired.
2 days out of 7.
basically you lose 70 perc of a week, to be physically somewhere else.

although sometimes my favorite part is reading a book on a plane. but id rather read it in the temecula library.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on July 20, 2016 - 11:53pm.

scaredyclassic wrote:
so 7 days.
you kill a day getting there and back.
5 days.
minus a day to recover.
4 days.
and probablt about a day of planning.
3 days.
you get sick or tired.
2 days out of 7.
basically you lose 70 perc of a week, to be physically somewhere else.

although sometimes my favorite part is reading a book on a plane. but id rather read it in the temecula library.

Haha... That exactly how I feel.

I'm a slow traveler now. The first day, I want to relax, sit at a cafe, lounge around

Submitted by The-Shoveler on July 21, 2016 - 5:42am.

My wife usually has all the time planned out from the minute we hit the tarmac,

We average about 4-5 hours a night in the hotel, I get home I have few few hours before I am due at work, I go to work and collapse LOL.

Submitted by svelte on July 21, 2016 - 6:32am.

scaredyclassic wrote:
so 7 days.
you kill a day getting there and back.
5 days.
minus a day to recover.
4 days.
and probablt about a day of planning.
3 days.
you get sick or tired.
2 days out of 7.
basically you lose 70 perc of a week, to be physically somewhere else.

although sometimes my favorite part is reading a book on a plane. but id rather read it in the temecula library.

The planning? We get to decide what new experiences we are going to have to get us out of the same old daily rut.

The trip out there? Get so see and meet all types of interesting people at the airport, on the plane, around town.

Sick on a trip? Hasn't happened to us yet, though for awhile we did tend to be sick the day after returning. That hasn't happened since we switched to healthy eating, maybe a coincidence I'm not sure.

Tired? Hell yeah but it's only because we pack so much into each day that we're exhausted when we get home. I make the most out of each trip, my wife has to tell me to slow down and let her sleep a bit. It's not in my nature though.

I have to say I do miss my own bed when traveling, but it comes with the territory. All the new experiences, people, places, smells, sights...all worth it.

Not saying that our outlook is better than someone who doesn't like to travel...just the way we feel about it.

Submitted by bearishgurl on July 21, 2016 - 11:05am.

I travel to see friends and family ... 95% by road. Although I have been to many "tourist traps" in several states in the past, especially when my kids were younger, I have avoided them in the past decade or so. I would rather visit people in their homes or have adventures with them (i.e. winery-hopping, skiing, jeeping, hiking, etc). I travel for adventure and to see my peeps. I don't care if we sit at their kitchen table and look at old photos and drink coffee most of the day. Or put photo albums together. Or tour their miles of leased land in their dirty-but-comfortable dually pickups to check livestock tags and count heads. Or visit family gravesites with flowers. Or ride horses. Or take a potluck to a family party. Or ride around in their restored "vintage" cars. ETC.

Except for the (crowded) Napa/Sonoma "crush" season and certain ski holidays (MLK and Presidents Day, which I now tend to avoid, due to long lift lines), I would prefer going off the beaten path to places where animals outnumber people. I have the Rubicon Trail and the Grand Tetons/Yellowstone still at the top of my "bucket list." :=0

As an experienced "motor-lodge queen extraordinaire," I don't get up to leave the next morning until I am rested as the next motel or the friend/family member I will stay with the next night don't care when I arrive.

I have driven coast to coast several times in 3-3.5 days (SD to/from GA/FL) with another driver where we alternately slept and switched drivers, never stopping for lodging. During those years, we both worked FT and were more pressed for time. But I am too old to do that now and my eyesight is not as good at night as it once was. I now drive just 7.5 to 11 hours per day ... and possibly one day per trip I drive about 13 hours.

Due to a condition I "inherited" (vertigo), I don't do well at all with turbulence on planes, especially over the airports I would have to land in. And I have rented and borrowed many vehicles while on vacation and don't care for them ... due to the frustration of getting an unfamiliar vehicle (frequently in the dark) with no time to figure it out. I like to have my OWN vehicle with me and I want the freedom to come and go as I please ... everywhere ... or even completely change my plans at the drop of a hat.

Now, if we could just get rid of the east/west roving, makeshift "Homeland Security" forced vehicle immigration "checkpoints" along I-8/I-10 which delay and interrogate AMERICANS in their OWN DAMN COUNTRY, road trips would again be what they should be ... the ultimate freedom.

A very tall, beautiful wall built at the int'l border should do the trick :=]

Having traveled by road thru ~20 states multiple times on multiple highways, there is so much to see in this great country of ours! You can't see anything from an airport terminal while you are changing planes. It's the best learning experience you will ever have or could ever give your children. For those who have never done this, you should try it sometime! It will open your eyes.

Submitted by bearishgurl on July 21, 2016 - 10:59am.

flyer wrote:
. . . One of our neighbors is in his late 60's--holds multiple patents--and is still working on others. We honestly don't know anyone who is completely "retired," regardless of their age or financial status.
I've got a relative like this and I always visit his tool and die shop when I'm in town. He's "semi-retired" but keeps extremely busy filling "special orders" for local businesses. He's invented so many interesting things and also holds multiple patents ... which seem to take a l-o-o-ong time to wind their way through the "system."

Submitted by bearishgurl on July 21, 2016 - 10:51am.

spdrun wrote:
FlyerInHI: Plenty of non-boring parts of the US. You just have to venture off the beaten path and not only go where everyone else is going.
Agree, spdrun. But I would add that the traveler who lives at or near sea level (ex: SD) would need to "acclimate themselves" at 5K altitude one night and 8K altitude the second night before venturing up further, whether by vehicle or foot.

And drink plenty of water and no alcohol 48-72 hours before ascending. Although mountain adventures are spectacular and offer the participant memories of a lifetime, they are not for the inexperienced driver, the faint of heart, someone with a fear of heights or someone with heart problems or other chronic, poorly-controlled health problems.

Submitted by mixxalot on July 21, 2016 - 12:03pm.

I hear ya! I love visiting new places but the physical aspect of getting on a long crowded commercial flight, dealing with the TSA hassle security checkpoints and painful flight is not pleasant. I have less desire now to travel than years past when I was younger. Plus San Diego is such a nice place to live that one can take a staycation for free and go to the beach for an enjoyable time.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on July 21, 2016 - 3:57pm.

spdrun wrote:
FlyerInHI: Plenty of non-boring parts of the US. You just have to venture off the beaten path and not only go where everyone else is going.

I am anti small towns or college towns that you mentioned before.
Ski resort don't count because you go there for sports, not for the towns.
Towns like Santa Barbara don't do anything for me. I'd rather take a trip to Panama City or Mexico City.

I don't like national parks. Boring. The American countryside is mostly mono agriculture with vast tracts of the same. It's not like European villages.

San Diego is fine. Nice weather, but boring. I like Honolulu and NYC. That's about it. Not crazy about SF. It's a small town that thinks it's big but still acts small.

Submitted by mixxalot on July 21, 2016 - 6:45pm.

true and the hole in the wall places that I like are definitely not Americanized :-)

Submitted by FlyerInHi on July 22, 2016 - 10:02am.

BG, I have traveled cross country 3 times. What you see on the road is not worth the time and effort.

My brother's wife's parents are southern folks. They like to drive their motorhome everywhere for months on end. The husband drives and wife is boss. That would be torture for me. But to each his own.

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