ot. hs graduation

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Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 3, 2016 - 8:02am

crotchety middle aged man that I am, the speeches from administration and students irked me.

also, lots of real fireworks at the end. overdone. the whole event in every aspect needs to tone it down.

Submitted by svelte on June 3, 2016 - 8:19am.

Yeah, I don't think I've been to a HS or college graduation where the speeches didn't make me cringe.

And now I don't remember a single thing that was said in any of them, including my HS and college graduations. Only memories I have is what is shown in a few photographs and one particular song chosen as the theme, I think it was at either my HS or college ceremony: Pablo Cruise "Find Your Place In The Sun". Must've been HS, can't imagine it being played at the university graduation.

Submitted by svelte on June 3, 2016 - 8:19am.

Yeah, I don't think I've been to a HS or college graduation where the speeches didn't make me cringe.

And now I don't remember a single thing that was said in any of them, including my HS and college graduations. Only memories I have is what is shown in a few photographs and one particular song chosen as the theme, I think it was at either my HS or college ceremony: Pablo Cruise "Find Your Place In The Sun". Must've been HS, can't imagine it being played at the university graduation.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on June 3, 2016 - 11:56am.

I think I remember the HS Grad speech,

It was something like

You'er not special, you'er most likely just cogs in the machine.
Welcome to the machine.

Yep I think that was the gist of it

But then again that was in the 70's and things were a little fuzzy.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 3, 2016 - 2:06pm.

The-Shoveler wrote:
I think I remember the HS Grad speech,

It was something like

You'er not special, you'er most likely just cogs in the machine.
Welcome to the machine.

Yep I think that was the gist of it

But then again that was in the 70's and things were a little fuzzy.

Funny isn't it? all those 70s kids could easily get into the machine and work. today the principal at the graduation I attended used the word amazing 10 times to describe the class who will likely be 50 Perc unemployed and avg. 100k in debt in just 4 years.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 3, 2016 - 2:11pm.

back in the 70s, the clash was complaining about jobs kids kill for today!!

Career Opportunities Lyrics
The offered me the office, offered me the leadership
They said I'd better take anything they'd got
Do you want to make tea at the BBC?
Do you want to be, do you really want to be a cop?

Career opportunities are the ones that never knock
Every job they offer you is to keep you out the dock
Career opportunity, the ones that never knock

I hate the army an' I hate the R.A.F.
I don't want to go fighting in the tropical heat
I hate the civil service rules
And I won't open letter bombs for you

Bus driver....ambulance man....ticket inspector

They're gonna have to introduce conscription
They're gonna have to take away my prescription
If they want to get me making toys
If they want to get me, well, I got no choice

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 3, 2016 - 2:12pm.

the world changes. most of those excited kids are unnecessary except to breed and consume.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 3, 2016 - 2:16pm.

The-Shoveler wrote:
I think I remember the HS Grad speech,

It was something like

You'er not special, you'er most likely just cogs in the machine.
Welcome to the machine.

Yep I think that was the gist of it

But then again that was in the 70's and things were a little fuzzy.

today's comparable speech would be, robots do everything you can do but better and faster, the best you can hope for is a universal basic income, legal weed and hopefully a,few gallons of water rations. you're so fucking special, you snowflake u, problem is all the snowflakes melted with global warming...

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 3, 2016 - 5:50pm.

scaredyclassic wrote:
The-Shoveler wrote:
I think I remember the HS Grad speech,

It was something like

You'er not special, you'er most likely just cogs in the machine.
Welcome to the machine.

Yep I think that was the gist of it

But then again that was in the 70's and things were a little fuzzy.

today's comparable speech would be, robots do everything you can do but better and faster, the best you can hope for is a universal basic income, legal weed and hopefully a,few gallons of water rations. you're so fucking special, you snowflake u, problem is all the snowflakes melted with global warming...

scaredy, I get all this. I got it over 15 years ago. All you can do is counsel your recent graduate to 1) NOT take out any student loans behind your back; 2) major in an occupation that no humans in India (or robots) can replace and declare that major ASAP (NOW would be preferable); and 3) take summer classes if they have to in order to graduate in four years.

It's okay, scaredy. All the special snowflakes out there working at Starbucks at age 28 (some with a Bachelor's AND Master's degree) are doing so because 1) they majored in the "wrong" field, and 2) they refuse to leave their "comfort zone" (parent's home/hometown) and thus won't apply for entry level positions in another county or state to get their foot in the door to start their careers.

The above description of an "indebted do-nothing college graduate" is particularly prevalent in SD County as well as the rest of SoCal. These kids don't want to leave our weather and the "comforts" of parents' homes and neighborhoods (backyard pool/beach neighborhood, etc) and the parents are taking them back after college graduation open-endedly with no plan to ever be on their own.

This phenomenon isn't near as prevalent in "flyover country" where its residents don't enjoy nearly as much of a "comfortable life" that we in SoCal do. Nor is it that prevalent on the east coast. When I moved to SD in my early 20's, a lot of my "contemporaries" (mostly co-workers) were FT college students living with parents. Some were graduate students who were several years older than me living with parents. The "coddled-teen-turned-coddled-adult" phenomenon was present in SD County ~40 years ago and is still present today. While living in my own rented apt (and paying my own rent), I was amazed that all these people my own age and older were still living with parents at 22-30+ years old and had no plans to move out (it only took 4 yrs to graduate from college back then and students didn't graduate with debt as CC/UC/CSU were "free" or had a very nominal cost). I was especially amazed at a couple of my co-workers who were unmarried single moms living with their parent(s) and who had more child(ren) while living with parents! Over 80% of my own HS class (in "flyover country") moved away from home ASAP after HS graduation (some the very next day or weekend, after they recovered from all the grad parties). A couple dozen of my classmates had their own apt all during their senior year in HS and worked at least 32 hrs per week to pay for it. A handful of my classmates were married their entire senior year and several of my married female classmates were in various stages of pregnancy in their caps and gowns at graduation. About 8-10% of the males in my HS class enlisted in the military the summer after our graduation. About 17% of my HS class immediately went on to college away from home and another ~3% of us (me incl) attended college as a freshman while living in the same (or adjacent) city we grew up in (junior college and state college). Almost NONE of us stayed "home" (parent[s] homes) to work FT after HS or while attending college ... even as a freshman!

It seems as if part of the "SoCal culture" is to hang with mom and/or dad as long as possible for ALL races/nationalities. There are people on my block (2) who are 65-70 years old who never moved out of mom and dad's house. Of course, they each now just have one parent left whom they are now assisting in their day to day lives.

Submitted by njtosd on June 3, 2016 - 9:29pm.

scaredyclassic wrote:
The-Shoveler wrote:
I think I remember the HS Grad speech,

It was something like

You'er not special, you'er most likely just cogs in the machine.
Welcome to the machine.

Yep I think that was the gist of it

But then again that was in the 70's and things were a little fuzzy.

Funny isn't it? all those 70s kids could easily get into the machine and work. today the principal at the graduation I attended used the word amazing 10 times to describe the class who will likely be 50 Perc unemployed and avg. 100k in debt in just 4 years.

I propose a moratorium on the use of the word "amazing" by those employed by school districts. It has become a throwaway word to use when they can't think of anything specific to say. There are a lot of wonderful adjectives out there that never get used. I hear a lot of "phenomenal" and "fantastic". How about honest, responsible, ambitious, curious, persistent, resilient, etc. etc.

My husband has to be out of town for work and may have to miss a middle school "promotion". I had to stop myself from saying that it wasn't a big deal because the ceremony is a bit of a farce. Actually, my daughter is playing in the jazz band - which, in my opinion, is good enough to do weddings. Frankly, I think they should do it so that we can cut down the fund raising.

Speaking of jazz, scaredy, are under 21 people permitted at the Temecula jazz performances you were mentioning a few weeks ago?

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 3, 2016 - 11:27pm.

njtosd wrote:
scaredyclassic wrote:
The-Shoveler wrote:
I think I remember the HS Grad speech,

It was something like

You'er not special, you'er most likely just cogs in the machine.
Welcome to the machine.

Yep I think that was the gist of it

But then again that was in the 70's and things were a little fuzzy.

Funny isn't it? all those 70s kids could easily get into the machine and work. today the principal at the graduation I attended used the word amazing 10 times to describe the class who will likely be 50 Perc unemployed and avg. 100k in debt in just 4 years.

I propose a moratorium on the use of the word "amazing" by those employed by school districts. It has become a throwaway word to use when they can't think of anything specific to say. There are a lot of wonderful adjectives out there that never get used. I hear a lot of "phenomenal" and "fantastic". How about honest, responsible, ambitious, curious, persistent, resilient, etc. etc.

My husband has to be out of town for work and may have to miss a middle school "promotion". I had to stop myself from saying that it wasn't a big deal because the ceremony is a bit of a farce. Actually, my daughter is playing in the jazz band - which, in my opinion, is good enough to do weddings. Frankly, I think they should do it so that we can cut down the fund raising.

Speaking of jazz, scaredy, are under 21 people permitted at the Temecula jazz performances you were mentioning a few weeks ago?

Yeah. amazing should be banned.
I brought my 13 year old to jazz at the Merc a few,weeks ago.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 3, 2016 - 11:44pm.

I saw a,spectator wearing a,shirt that said STARVE THE EGO...

Submitted by svelte on June 4, 2016 - 12:57am.

Oh give me a gd break.

It's not as dire as you all make it to be.

I've got two kids.

One four year degree. Got a great job in the bay area this year. Making a lot of $$ but renting.

The other a certificate, not even a two year degree. Making an equal amount of $$ in SD, able to buy a house which the other kid can't do. Will the 4 year degree win out? No doubt in the long run. But for now, neck in neck, both working office jobs for great corporations, both hard working, both going for the gold.

Let's not be doom-n-gloomers. Is the world as it was 50 years ago? of course not. But human nature being what it is, there will always be lazy folks and those that will do whatever it takes to be successful. Degree or not.

As the saying goes, you can't keep a good man down.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on June 4, 2016 - 8:19am.

LOL,

The 70's and early 80's were no picnic.

IMO the current grads will have much better opportunities than we did.

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 4, 2016 - 10:12am.

svelte wrote:
Oh give me a gd break.

It's not as dire as you all make it to be.

I've got two kids.

One four year degree. Got a great job in the bay area this year. Making a lot of $$ but renting.

The other a certificate, not even a two year degree. Making an equal amount of $$ in SD, able to buy a house which the other kid can't do. Will the 4 year degree win out? No doubt in the long run. But for now, neck in neck, both working office jobs for great corporations, both hard working, both going for the gold.

Let's not be doom-n-gloomers. Is the world as it was 50 years ago? of course not. But human nature being what it is, there will always be lazy folks and those that will do whatever it takes to be successful. Degree or not.

As the saying goes, you can't keep a good man down.

Agree with this. Your degreed kid can't buy anything in the bay area simply because the prices are too high for a "recent" grad (one who graduated in the past 10 years). They haven't yet had enough time to save up $175k++ for a downpayment and possibly don't make enough to qualify for a supercomforming or jumbo mortgage (by themselves). My kid(s) are successful in the bay area as well (SF) but still renting for 12+ years, during which time SF residential real estate has gone up in price 250%+ (in spite of the "2008+ recession" which had little effect on this city).

A one-year "certificate" from a CC or private occupational school can get one a job at an insurance company, bank, medical/dental office or an administrative or account clerk position anywhere. Once the certificate-holder starts working, they can move up from their entry-level position. It's a totally respectable and affordable way to get trained after HS. The worker can always attend college later on in the eves .... AFTER their employer agrees to pay for it!

I agree that boomers had it much easier on living expenses than millenials do .... straight out of HS. My first apt in SD (Banker's Hill) was $140 month (incl all utils as it had a "boiler room"). It was a beautiful, spacious "vintage" apt in an historic bldg with my own private small yard. BUT the wages then were far, far less than they are today. Fortunately, I made good tips, lived very well and was able to pay cash for a brand new car (~$5K for a "loaded" vehicle at the time) :=0

Disclaimer: I was not a college student at the time.

It all depends on the motivation of the kid how successful they're going to be as a young adult. And I believe the parents' input on expectations (or lack thereof) affect that level of motivation. The lazy 20-something indebted-millenial-whiner college graduates just don't want to alter their lifestyles (ex: pay exorbitant rent in Gritty City to place themselves in positions to make the Big Bucks). For many CA millennials, it's easier to camp out in parents' back bdrms indefinitely (if their parent(s) are willing). Especially if they will have their own baths, access to pool/jacuzzi, garage parking, etc, etc. And a lot of these kids are heavily indebted after graduation cuz they chose a PRIVATE college over public and/or borrowed copious amounts of money for living expenses while in college (ex rented "luxury" apt, did not have enough roommates, weekly salon visits, mall shopping, amusement parks, eating out at full-service restaurants ... the list goes on). These same ex-students are now crying wolf because they're in debt for ~100K just from earning a bachelor degree at a CA public university!

Where were their parents when their student was wasting $$$$ every quarter/semester on non-necessities? Didn't any financial advice or talks occur between parent and student? Were these students ever counseled against taking out a student loan by anyone who cared about them??

A large portion of student loans were taken out solely to "upgrade" the lifestyle of the student while in college. Their tuition, fees, books and parking were already covered (and then some). I know this because I know VA Chapter 35 eligible students (now grads) who did this (unbeknownst to their parents) and had to return "home" after graduation to start making their student loan payments. Needless to say, their parents were furious when they found out because VA Chapter 35 eligible students now receive over $1060 month from the VA over and above their (year-round) tuition waiver! A part time job of 12-15 hrs week at min wage could have solved all their problems! Yes, even at a large urban CA campus!

I've always "talked turkey" to my kids. I'm not their "friend" (they've got 100's of those, lol). I'm their parent.

I don't feel sorry for any of these indebted "entitled brats." They did it to themselves.

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 4, 2016 - 10:09am.

The-Shoveler wrote:
LOL,

The 70's and early 80's were no picnic.

IMO the current grads will have much better opportunities than we did.

You're damned straight, Shoveler! Our living expenses were much less than today but we had to work our asses off doing (often physical) jobs that today's millenials would balk at. And there wasn't any "telecommuting," LOL. We punched a time clock (even in and out for "lunch") all the way up to 1990 .... yeah, even working for the "gubment."

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 4, 2016 - 10:44am.

svelte wrote:
Oh give me a gd break.

It's not as dire as you all make it to be.

I've got two kids.

One four year degree. Got a great job in the bay area this year. Making a lot of $$ but renting.

The other a certificate, not even a two year degree. Making an equal amount of $$ in SD, able to buy a house which the other kid can't do. Will the 4 year degree win out? No doubt in the long run. But for now, neck in neck, both working office jobs for great corporations, both hard working, both going for the gold.

Let's not be doom-n-gloomers. Is the world as it was 50 years ago? of course not. But human nature being what it is, there will always be lazy folks and those that will do whatever it takes to be successful. Degree or not.

As the saying goes, you can't keep a good man down.

ok. I was probably overreacting to all the cheerleaders, praise and optimism in my usually foolish way. but still. The Clash song would be different.

Submitted by flyer on June 4, 2016 - 3:45pm.

Imo, concerning grads going forward--just like everything in life--some people will get what they want out of life--and some won't. That's nothing new, and has, and will always be true.

Imo, the problem, from what I've seen with my kids' friends--most kids today are being conditioned to believe that everyone will get everything they want in life--so they have no coping skills if things don't go as planned, and that is proving to be a real problem for many of them in the real world.

I agree that kids should be encouraged to go for the gold, but, imo, they should also be encouraged to develop skills that enable them cope with reality as well.

Submitted by Reality on June 4, 2016 - 9:27pm.

I skipped my HS graduation 36 years ago. Getting through HS didn't feel like any big achievement. Only a total screw up would not get through.

College graduation I did walk though. There I felt like I accomplished something.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 4, 2016 - 9:35pm.

David foster Wallace's graduation speech is ok by me. of course he killed self.

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-best-...

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 4, 2016 - 9:47pm.

flyer wrote:
Imo, concerning grads going forward--just like everything in life--some people will get what they want out of life--and some won't. That's nothing new, and has, and will always be true.

Imo, the problem, from what I've seen with my kids' friends--most kids today are being conditioned to believe that everyone will get everything they want in life--so they have no coping skills if things don't go as planned, and that is proving to be a real problem for many of them in the real world.

I agree that kids should be encouraged to go for the gold, but, imo, they should also be encouraged to develop skills that enable them cope with reality as well.

+1

and,something about those grad. speeches triggered it bad for me. my wife got irritated with how irritated I got.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 4, 2016 - 11:55pm.

Reality wrote:
I skipped my HS graduation 36 years ago. Getting through HS didn't feel like any big achievement. Only a total screw up would not get through.

College graduation I did walk though. There I felt like I accomplished something.

seems cool to skip graduation.

Submitted by millennial on June 6, 2016 - 3:52pm.

Reality wrote:
I skipped my HS graduation 36 years ago. Getting through HS didn't feel like any big achievement. Only a total screw up would not get through.

College graduation I did walk though. There I felt like I accomplished something.

I never understood why the big deal either. My next door neighbor's kid had a graduation party last weekend that went through the end of the night. I remember some kids in my HS having those, but my dad's response was "Why do you need a party for graduating HS? Aren't you only accomplishing something that should be expected? Tell you what, we'll have one when you get a PHD." Needless to say, still waiting for my party.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 6, 2016 - 4:29pm.

yamashi wrote:
Reality wrote:
I skipped my HS graduation 36 years ago. Getting through HS didn't feel like any big achievement. Only a total screw up would not get through.

College graduation I did walk though. There I felt like I accomplished something.

I never understood why the big deal either. My next door neighbor's kid had a graduation party last weekend that went through the end of the night. I remember some kids in my HS having those, but my dad's response was "Why do you need a party for graduating HS? Aren't you only accomplishing something that should be expected? Tell you what, we'll have one when you get a PHD." Needless to say, still waiting for my party.

Well, partying is good. it need not be tied to anything specific but I don't object to all night parties.

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