OT: Ebola - Global Pandemic?

User Forum Topic
Submitted by paramount on July 31, 2014 - 11:51am

Time to run down to home depot to pick up some masks/respirators?

Time to close the borders?

A repeat of the Spanish Flu Pandemic of 1917-1918 only deadlier?

Or pure hysteria?

http://youtu.be/JnQVUf775VE

Ebola 2014

Submitted by CA renter on October 7, 2014 - 2:17am.

zk wrote:
CA renter wrote:

Also, "casual contact" means contact that isn't sexual or where one wouldn't consciously expect fluids to be exchanged. And the story about the journalist didn't say anything at all about the chair being soaked in any blood or bodily fluids. While I'm guessing a patient had used the chair, bodily fluids were not mentioned, and they made a point to say that safety measures were in place.

In both the carrying of the woman and the decontaminating of the chair, you’re assuming a lack of bodily fluids. It’s those kinds of assumptions that lead to your invalid conclusions. It doesn’t make sense to use those examples to conclude that the virus is easier to transmit then “they” are telling you it is when you don’t really know what the situation was.
CA renter wrote:

If someone picks their nose or sneezes into their hand, and then holds onto a stair rail or touches a door handle, it sounds like that's enough for transmission. This sounds very much like a highly contagious disease.

“Sounds like” doesn’t seem like much to go on. What makes it “sound like” to you that holding a stair rail after sneezing into your hand is enough to spread the disease?
CA renter wrote:

Remember, the govt was telling people that the air was safe to breathe after the Sept 11 attacks, even when they knew otherwise. We have no reason to blindly believe what they are telling us. Their #1 job is to prevent panic and chaos, not necessarily to ensure our safety. If you need evidence of this, just look at the stories above about the guys with the pressure washer and the hiring of private "hazmat" guys from Illinois to decontaminate the apartment -- where four people had been living with soiled sheets and towels -- FIVE days after this man was diagnosed.

No doubt some mistakes were made. But I don’t see how that translates into “the government is hiding things from us to a degree that makes a large –scale outbreak something to worry about.”

Unless you have a propensity to see these kinds of things where there is nothing. Conspiracy theorists and paranoids of all stripes are constantly seeing some massive, horrible, world-changing, armageddon-type event on the horizon, but they don't seem daunted by the fact that they're basically always wrong.

I use the words "sounds like" or "seems like" or "IMHO/IMO" when I cannot say something with 100% certainty but have strong evidence or reason to believe something to be true. More people should try it.

As for those damned "conspiracy theorists"...

There is perhaps no more controversial issue in assessing the limits of political and
administrative discretion than the question of whether it is ever ethical for a public official to lie in the public interest. While we cringe at the thought of legitimating mendacity by public
officials, we have the realistic admonition of Michael Walzer that "no one succeeds in politics
without getting their hands dirty." This paper will look first at the defense of official deception as
classically articulated by Machiavelli and Walzer. We will then look at the case against lying by
officials presented by Sissela Bok and Maureen Ramsay, with a focus on Ramsay's extensive
arguments in The Politics of Lying against the "just
lie" theory. We will finally test the feasibility of the just lie theory by applying its standards to a case study based on actual administrative experience where recourse to deception appears to have achieved a good result."

https://www.mtholyoke.edu/sites/default/...

http://www.commondreams.org/views/2013/0...

The theory that the government doesn't intentionally lie (for either benevolent or malevolent reasons) is naive. ;)

Submitted by zk on October 7, 2014 - 6:34am.

CA renter wrote:

The theory that the government doesn't intentionally lie (for either benevolent or malevolent reasons) is naive. ;)

If I gave the impression that I thought the government never lies, I certainly didn't intend to. I know they lie, and sometimes even for malevolent reasons. But I don't think that (U.S.) government evilness is the norm or even common. I think it's pretty rare. There are people who think it's the norm. And those are the people who are your real conspiracy nuts. And, CAR, I might have given the impression that I lump you in with those nuts. I don't, and I'm sorry if I gave that impression. I think there's a spectrum of paranoia, and those people are way out on the end of it. I think you're more paranoid than you should be. But, I'm willing to accept the possibility that your fears are justified (and therefore not paranoia), and that I'm less afraid than I should be. I don't think so, but it's possible, and I can certainly agree to disagree with you on that. But your real nuts who always see armageddon coming and government conspiracy, I think they're obviously wrong.

Submitted by njtosd on October 7, 2014 - 1:36pm.

CA renter wrote:
As for how contagious this disease can be...this pertains to the most recent journalist/cameraman who is being flown to NE:

"She said her son did not know how he contracted the virus.

“He took all the necessary precautions and he was very aware of the precautions to take,” she said. “He helped decontaminate a car and he was wearing protective [gear] but he thinks maybe some water splashed on him.”'

..."Ashoka’s father is Dr Mitchell Levy, the medical director of the intensive care unit at Rhode Island Hospital. He told CNN it was unclear how his son got the virus, but added: "He was helping inside clinics disinfecting, whether it was a chair or some vehicle that had potentially been exposed, he remembers getting some of it in his face."'

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnew...

........

So, the notion that you have to be "digging around" in a sick/dead patient's blood, feces, urine, saliva, teardrops, etc. is a bit naive, IMHO. Apparently, it doesn't take much contact with bodily fluids, and it can be transmitted via very casual contact, like carrying a pregnant woman with the disease to a taxi, or decontaminating a chair. And to claim that it's not airborne, as if the virus dies suddenly when mucus/saliva is forcefully expelled from the body by a cough or sneeze, seems a bit too optimistic.

Your conclusion assumes that the man would be honest about his activities. There are all sorts of reasons that someone might not want to admit intimate contact with another person - especially if that person wants to come to the US and is concerned about being labelled as being somewhat at fault for his condition. And, I know I will be criticized for this, but here goes anyway: this guy and his mom are interesting, but not the people I would expect to be rigidly factual. Here is some info about them:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...

Submitted by Zeitgeist on October 7, 2014 - 1:54pm.

Wow! You can't make this stuff up.

Submitted by zk on October 8, 2014 - 7:24am.

Zeitgeist wrote:

Your world view is simplistic.

zk wrote:

I'm very curious to hear why you think that.

Nothing, huh, Zeitgeist? That's what I thought.

Submitted by CA renter on October 8, 2014 - 1:18am.

zk wrote:
CA renter wrote:

The theory that the government doesn't intentionally lie (for either benevolent or malevolent reasons) is naive. ;)

If I gave the impression that I thought the government never lies, I certainly didn't intend to. I know they lie, and sometimes even for malevolent reasons. But I don't think that (U.S.) government evilness is the norm or even common. I think it's pretty rare. There are people who think it's the norm. And those are the people who are your real conspiracy nuts. And, CAR, I might have given the impression that I lump you in with those nuts. I don't, and I'm sorry if I gave that impression. I think there's a spectrum of paranoia, and those people are way out on the end of it. I think you're more paranoid than you should be. But, I'm willing to accept the possibility that your fears are justified (and therefore not paranoia), and that I'm less afraid than I should be. I don't think so, but it's possible, and I can certainly agree to disagree with you on that. But your real nuts who always see armageddon coming and government conspiracy, I think they're obviously wrong.

No worries, zk. Oddly enough, I didn't take your comments personally, but thanks for the clarification. Does that mean I'm not paranoid? ;)

All the best!

Submitted by CA renter on October 8, 2014 - 1:36am.

njtosd wrote:
CA renter wrote:
As for how contagious this disease can be...this pertains to the most recent journalist/cameraman who is being flown to NE:

"She said her son did not know how he contracted the virus.

“He took all the necessary precautions and he was very aware of the precautions to take,” she said. “He helped decontaminate a car and he was wearing protective [gear] but he thinks maybe some water splashed on him.”'

..."Ashoka’s father is Dr Mitchell Levy, the medical director of the intensive care unit at Rhode Island Hospital. He told CNN it was unclear how his son got the virus, but added: "He was helping inside clinics disinfecting, whether it was a chair or some vehicle that had potentially been exposed, he remembers getting some of it in his face."'

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnew...

........

So, the notion that you have to be "digging around" in a sick/dead patient's blood, feces, urine, saliva, teardrops, etc. is a bit naive, IMHO. Apparently, it doesn't take much contact with bodily fluids, and it can be transmitted via very casual contact, like carrying a pregnant woman with the disease to a taxi, or decontaminating a chair. And to claim that it's not airborne, as if the virus dies suddenly when mucus/saliva is forcefully expelled from the body by a cough or sneeze, seems a bit too optimistic.

Your conclusion assumes that the man would be honest about his activities. There are all sorts of reasons that someone might not want to admit intimate contact with another person - especially if that person wants to come to the US and is concerned about being labelled as being somewhat at fault for his condition. And, I know I will be criticized for this, but here goes anyway: this guy and his mom are interesting, but not the people I would expect to be rigidly factual. Here is some info about them:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2779257/NBC-cameraman-Ebola-reincarnation-Tibetan-teacher-mother-married-Buddhist-guru-16.html

All true. I did look into his background a bit when I first saw the story, so knew about the weird family history. Still, the guy has apparently spent many years trying to help those less fortunate, so I'm going to give him some credit. After all, anyone can lie about anything, but we have to trust that most people will try to be honest, at least most of the time (I hope!).

Also, just noticed that he thinks he got the disease while disinfecting (spray washing) a car, not a chair. I need new glasses. :(

Submitted by outtamojo on October 8, 2014 - 2:07am.

They are gonna off that Spanish lady's dog.
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/spain-to-kil...

Submitted by Zeitgeist on October 8, 2014 - 1:25pm.

zk,
You have your weltanschauung and I have mine. I do not want to argue with you because it is a waste of time or to quote Heinlein: “Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.” If you don't want to read my posts why not just ignore me and look for posts that are more aligned with who you are.

By the way, "The man who brought Ebola to the United States from West Africa 18 days ago has died in Dallas. Thomas Eric Duncan succumbed to the virus at 7.51am today at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital. His fiancée Louise Troh spoke out in anger shortly after his death and called for a full review of his medical care. Reverend Jesse Jackson, who appeared in public with Duncan's mother, raised the specter of legal action against the hospital as he contemned Duncan's treatment."
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...

Submitted by The-Shoveler on October 8, 2014 - 1:53pm.

Anyone know how many Ebola patients have been treated in the U.S.A. ?

Seems the Odd's may be about the same here or overseas as far as when you are already ill.

Submitted by zk on October 8, 2014 - 3:32pm.

Zeitgeist wrote:
zk,
You have your weltanschauung and I have mine. I do not want to argue with you because it is a waste of time or to quote Heinlein: “Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.”

Well, Zeitgeist, if you want to say I have a simplistic world view, and if you want to compare my ability to debate with that of a pig to sing, you certainly have that right. But if you can back neither of those points with any evidence, then it says a lot more about you than it does about me.
Zeitgeist wrote:

If you don't want to read my posts why not just ignore me and look for posts that are more aligned with who you are.

What gives you the idea that I don’t want to read your posts? No, I enjoy debating those with whom I disagree. That should be obvious. If I’ve given any indication that I don’t want to debate, by all means point it out. I’m pretty sure you’ll come up empty handed. Yet again.
Zeitgeist wrote:
By the way, "The man who brought Ebola to the United States from West Africa 18 days ago has died in Dallas. Thomas Eric Duncan succumbed to the virus at 7.51am today at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital. His fiancée Louise Troh spoke out in anger shortly after his death and called for a full review of his medical care. Reverend Jesse Jackson, who appeared in public with Duncan's mother, raised the specter of legal action against the hospital as he contemned Duncan's treatment."
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2785245/Dallas-Ebola-patient-dies-Thomas-Eric-Duncan-succumbs-deadly-disease-bringing-America-Liberia.html#ixzz3FaSRpyIz

Yeah, chances were he was going to die. He had ebola. And of course Jesse Jackson was there threatening legal action. There were lots of cameras. If you think any of that is relevant to my point that there won’t be a widespread outbreak, I think you’re wrong. But I’d love to hear your reasoning so that we can debate it.

Submitted by Zeitgeist on October 8, 2014 - 7:18pm.

zk,
I pray you are right and I am wrong. This is something I do not want to be right about. I hope the government is handling infection in a competent fashion and that the public is protected from this and other diseases that are being brought in from other countries as well as our own homegrown seasonal varieties. I remain hopefully skeptical based on how this first case was mishandled. Perhaps the various agencies involved will learn from their errors.

This is why I am skeptical, since you like to know these things: "U.S. officials initially described the number of people potentially exposed as a handful, and on Wednesday said it was up to 18. But on Thursday, the Texas health department said there were about 100 potential contacts. However, Dallas County officials said more than 80 had direct or indirect contact with the patient. 'We are working from a list of about 100 potential or possible contacts,' Texas health department spokeswoman Carrie Williams said."
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/0...

The way I understand math, 100 is more than a handful and that is what I consider as lack of transparancy.

Submitted by zk on October 8, 2014 - 8:44pm.

Zeitgeist wrote:
zk,
I pray you are right and I am wrong. This is something I do not want to be right about. I hope the government is handling infection in a competent fashion and that the public is protected from this and other diseases that are being brought in from other countries as well as our own homegrown seasonal varieties. I remain hopefully skeptical based on how this first case was mishandled. Perhaps the various agencies involved will learn from their errors.

Totally agree.

Zeitgeist wrote:

This is why I am skeptical, since you like to know these things: "U.S. officials initially described the number of people potentially exposed as a handful, and on Wednesday said it was up to 18. But on Thursday, the Texas health department said there were about 100 potential contacts. However, Dallas County officials said more than 80 had direct or indirect contact with the patient. 'We are working from a list of about 100 potential or possible contacts,' Texas health department spokeswoman Carrie Williams said."
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/0...

The way I understand math, 100 is more than a handful and that is what I consider as lack of transparancy.

Interesting points. It could be, as you say, lack of transparency. It could also be incompetence and stupidity and poor communication. It's probably a bit of all of them. I don't think any of that rises to the level of major conspiracy, nor do I think there will be a major conspiracy.

My view of how ebola spreads and what the potential is for the current situation is informed by scientists, not the government. Scientists, as a general rule, get their view from the science of a situation, not the politics of it. There are some scientists out there whose view of how ebola spreads is scarier than the government's view. But even those scientists think a widespread outbreak in this country is highly unlikely.

Submitted by moneymaker on October 8, 2014 - 9:31pm.

So did the Spainards test the dog or are they just dog haters over there. If it is transmissible by dogs then that is very bad, probably would be transmissible by other mammals as well.

Submitted by pencilneck on October 8, 2014 - 11:31pm.

They aren't dog haters.

Ebola is widely assumed to be a zoonotic disease. That is, it is assumed to be a disease that jumps occasionally from wild animals to humans. This is a safe assumption. Many "new" diseases do this.

We barely understand ebola's interaction with humans. It may be a long time before we know how ebola interacts with household animals such as dogs, cats, rabbits, finches, ferrets, chickens, hamsters etc.

In the case of the dog, possibly erring on the side of caution is prudent. Especially if it may help to save human lives.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on October 9, 2014 - 9:33am.

Zeitgeist wrote:
zk,
I pray you are right and I am wrong. This is something I do not want to be right about. I hope the government is handling infection in a competent fashion and that the public is protected from this and other diseases that are being brought in from other countries as well as our own homegrown seasonal varieties. I remain hopefully skeptical based on how this first case was mishandled. Perhaps the various agencies involved will learn from their errors.

This is why I am skeptical, since you like to know these things: "U.S. officials initially described the number of people potentially exposed as a handful, and on Wednesday said it was up to 18. But on Thursday, the Texas health department said there were about 100 potential contacts. However, Dallas County officials said more than 80 had direct or indirect contact with the patient. 'We are working from a list of about 100 potential or possible contacts,' Texas health department spokeswoman Carrie Williams said."
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/0...

The way I understand math, 100 is more than a handful and that is what I consider as lack of transparancy.

How do you expect the government to handle this?

The CDC had a bulletin out and the local Dallas hospital did not follow the bulletin resulting in a delay in treating Thomas Eric Duncan. That's where the mistake was.

Submitted by UCGal on October 9, 2014 - 3:15pm.

pencilneck wrote:
They aren't dog haters.

Ebola is widely assumed to be a zoonotic disease. That is, it is assumed to be a disease that jumps occasionally from wild animals to humans. This is a safe assumption. Many "new" diseases do this.

We barely understand ebola's interaction with humans. It may be a long time before we know how ebola interacts with household animals such as dogs, cats, rabbits, finches, ferrets, chickens, hamsters etc.

In the case of the dog, possibly erring on the side of caution is prudent. Especially if it may help to save human lives.


Prior to this outbreak the suspected starts of the ebola outbreaks were traced back to a family eating an infected monkey. So it definitely can infect monkeys. No reason to presume it can't be transfered to other mammals.

Submitted by Coronita on October 12, 2014 - 7:57am.

Looks like the a nurse at texas now has it.... The question is, if this is a nurse that encountered Duncan before they took precaution or a nurse that encountered Duncan the second time, after they took precaution.

If it's the latter, it does raise an eyebrow for folks saying that it's not easy to get......

http://www.cnn.Com/2014/10/12/health/ebo...

Meanwhile, anyone know if any of the Marines dispatched to Africa on a humanitarian aid were from San Diego? If so, just saying. Me might not be so sheltered after all.

Also, anyone know what's Dr. Kent Branty's blood type is? Seems like people getting a blood transfusion with the antibodies are surviving.

Some are complaining Duncan didn't get treated well in the hospital, but I suspect it's because they ran out of ZMapp and his blood type didn't match.

Submitted by ltsddd on October 12, 2014 - 8:23am.

"...the worker wore a gown, gloves, mask and shield"

Ebola is likely to be more easily transmitted than we're led to believe.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on October 12, 2014 - 8:49am.

ltsdd wrote:
"...the worker wore a gown, gloves, mask and shield"

Ebola is likely to be more easily transmitted than we're led to believe.

OK now I'm nervous

Humanity has gotten out of control and I'm sure the globe is sick of us

Submitted by outtamojo on October 12, 2014 - 10:49am.

According to Yahoo article, nurse who caught it knew full well she was treating Ebola patient and was wearing the full protective outfit.
I work in healthcare and I knew all along how these bulletins and special protocols work. They send you emails and maybe let you put on the gear a few times and then make you sign a piece of paper saying you were trained but nothing preps you for the real thing. There is only one good teacher and that is experience, which we dont have in good supply.
They will try to blame it on the poor
worker but in my view the pencil pushers as they always do failed to take into account the practical aspect of a learning curve.
They need to set up a team able to travel to care for stateside Ebola patients so they can get the necessary experience. They need to set up rooms for the team to live so they self quarantine.
The range in talent between the best and the worst healthcare workers is such that if you send in the worst you are just sending them in to die.
Hug your healthcare worker today for they risk their own lives and that of their families everyday.

Submitted by zk on October 12, 2014 - 11:42am.

outtamojo wrote:
According to Yahoo article, nurse who caught it knew full well she was treating Ebola patient and was wearing the full protective outfit.
I work in healthcare and I knew all along how these bulletins and special protocols work. They send you emails and maybe let you put on the gear a few times and then make you sign a piece of paper saying you were trained but nothing preps you for the real thing. There is only one good teacher and that is experience, which we dont have in good supply.
They will try to blame it on the poor
worker but in my view the pencil pushers as they always do failed to take into account the practical aspect of a learning curve.
They need to set up a team able to travel to care for stateside Ebola patients so they can get the necessary experience. They need to set up rooms for the team to live so they self quarantine.
The range in talent between the best and the worst healthcare workers is such that if you send in the worst you are just sending them in to die.
Hug your healthcare worker today for they risk their own lives and that of their families everyday.

Good points and good ideas, mojo. I like the traveling team idea.

I imagine that the story of the Texas healthcare worker will be similar to the Spain healthcare worker. Made a small mistake and paid for it tragically. Not to put the blame on her. Like you said, without experience in dealing with these things, it would be very difficult to make zero mistakes.

Submitted by outtamojo on October 12, 2014 - 11:47am.

"At some point, there was a breach in protocol, and that breach in protocol resulted in this infection," he said at a news conference Sunday. "The (Ebola treatment) protocols work. ... But we know that even a single lapse or breach can result in infection."
http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/12/health/ebo...

That @hole from the CDC Frieden is blaming the worker. If that guy was in charge of highways he would take out all the center dividers and lane markers and tell everyone to just drive carefully and don't run into anyone. Who needs lane dividers when everyone just needs to be careful? If you have an accident it's because you didn't follow the protocol to not run into anyone.
Mr. stop ebola in its tracks needs to get with the program and admit his precious protocol is a little light on safeguards and contingencies. Resign!

Submitted by outtamojo on October 12, 2014 - 12:09pm.

zk wrote:
outtamojo wrote:
According to Yahoo article, nurse who caught it knew full well she was treating Ebola patient and was wearing the full protective outfit.
I work in healthcare and I knew all along how these bulletins and special protocols work. They send you emails and maybe let you put on the gear a few times and then make you sign a piece of paper saying you were trained but nothing preps you for the real thing. There is only one good teacher and that is experience, which we dont have in good supply.
They will try to blame it on the poor
worker but in my view the pencil pushers as they always do failed to take into account the practical aspect of a learning curve.
They need to set up a team able to travel to care for stateside Ebola patients so they can get the necessary experience. They need to set up rooms for the team to live so they self quarantine.
The range in talent between the best and the worst healthcare workers is such that if you send in the worst you are just sending them in to die.
Hug your healthcare worker today for they risk their own lives and that of their families everyday.

Good points and good ideas, mojo. I like the traveling team idea.

I imagine that the story of the Texas healthcare worker will be similar to the Spain healthcare worker. Made a small mistake and paid for it tragically. Not to put the blame on her. Like you said, without experience in dealing with these things, it would be very difficult to make zero mistakes.

A care team from the military sounds ideal - they are already on duty and I bet they get way more training than your average hospital worker.
http://www.naturalnews.com/047226_Ebola_...
That Frieden guy needs to resign.

Submitted by joec on October 12, 2014 - 12:21pm.

The problem with perfect protocol is that it's very hard to get everyone on-board and skilled with it.

Even something as simple as wearing a mask or respirator can be done wrong, like if you have a beard, long hair or facial hair or glasses, you need to cut it or trim it or use something special for something as simple as glasses since you can't form a perfect seal on a respirator.

In a disaster or rush, people won't do this unless everyone has long training times and knowledge of it already.

I agree that it's "easier" to get ebola than the powers to be make it since these medical workers who catch it already knew they had a live case.

They could have done something stupid, but it's not a stretch to assume they tried to be safe as well and still got infected.

Submitted by outtamojo on October 12, 2014 - 12:33pm.

No, the problem with a perfect protocol is that...we come to believe they are perfect. We will make no progress if we believe our protocols to be perfect and refuse to consider that they may be imperfect; which is why Frieden needs to resign or Obama needs to fire him.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on October 12, 2014 - 3:31pm.

How do you make a private hospital follow protocols handed down from CDC and NIH?

Submitted by Coronita on October 12, 2014 - 3:04pm.

Well just thinking out loud. If we're talking about nurses/caregivers handing the ebola patient(s).

Shouldn't we at least we screen the nurses/caregivers and find the ones that at least are compatible to previous survivor's blood type(s) and maybe work from that angle, in case it comes to that?

Assuming the worst case scenario that it's easier to get ebola than people assumed, at least wouldn't it make sense to take some precautionary steps and try to find the ones that are have a slightly better chance of surviving, given what limited tools we have right now?

I really hope hospitals elsewhere take this much more seriously.. Me thinks that if hospitals wait until they have a case, it's already kinda late in the game...

Submitted by CA renter on October 12, 2014 - 11:01pm.

outtamojo wrote:
zk wrote:
outtamojo wrote:
According to Yahoo article, nurse who caught it knew full well she was treating Ebola patient and was wearing the full protective outfit.
I work in healthcare and I knew all along how these bulletins and special protocols work. They send you emails and maybe let you put on the gear a few times and then make you sign a piece of paper saying you were trained but nothing preps you for the real thing. There is only one good teacher and that is experience, which we dont have in good supply.
They will try to blame it on the poor
worker but in my view the pencil pushers as they always do failed to take into account the practical aspect of a learning curve.
They need to set up a team able to travel to care for stateside Ebola patients so they can get the necessary experience. They need to set up rooms for the team to live so they self quarantine.
The range in talent between the best and the worst healthcare workers is such that if you send in the worst you are just sending them in to die.
Hug your healthcare worker today for they risk their own lives and that of their families everyday.

Good points and good ideas, mojo. I like the traveling team idea.

I imagine that the story of the Texas healthcare worker will be similar to the Spain healthcare worker. Made a small mistake and paid for it tragically. Not to put the blame on her. Like you said, without experience in dealing with these things, it would be very difficult to make zero mistakes.

A care team from the military sounds ideal - they are already on duty and I bet they get way more training than your average hospital worker.
http://www.naturalnews.com/047226_Ebola_...
That Frieden guy needs to resign.

Totally agree with all of your posts on this, outtamojo.

Submitted by kev374 on October 13, 2014 - 6:40pm.

ltsdd wrote:
"...the worker wore a gown, gloves, mask and shield"

Ebola is likely to be more easily transmitted than we're led to believe.

The authorities routinely say it's not easily transmissible...that is expected, they don't want to start a panic.

People are panicking as it is, imagine if they went out and said "Oh btw don't touch anything because you could get Ebola and die" LMAO!

From what I have read Ebola is able to survive on surfaces contacted by the infected for days in the right environment. It can then enter through microcracks in the skin when another person contacts that same surface.

And Ebola is supposed to be an exceptionally small virus so it requires an extremely microscopic breach in the skin to enter.

Of course, in the grand scheme of things it is still not a pandemic stage since 1 or 2 people contracting the virus means nothing really. But the potential for a pandemic is what is concerning.

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