Millenia (Is it truly the "Next thing" The South County is looking for?)

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Submitted by Svile1604 on November 12, 2015 - 6:40pm

Hello fellow Piggington subscribers....

As I find myself a "new join" to this community, I was waiting for a relevant subject to put forth across the forum. I am a millennial that finds himself a homeowner in the Otay Ranch community of Chula Vista. As I am sure many residents around me have noticed, there is a rather ambitious planned community project being stood up directly to the south of my community.

The project is known as Millenia (Milleniasd.com). A luxury apartment section of the community is almost finished. The website makes claims that it will bring the South County a new heart, and will be the next great place in San Diego. As the website tosses around "San Diego" and "South County" quite abit, I suspect they are wanting to stray away from using "Chula Vista" in their pitch.

I was wondering if any users here had some thoughts on just what this undertaking will actually deliver to Chula Vista and the greater San Diego area. Is it the next big "hybrid community" that South County needs?

Submitted by The-Shoveler on November 12, 2015 - 6:51pm.

What they are actually letting them build something in SD?
LOL,

Whatever just seems like a corny name or gimmick to me.

Next you will see a retirement community in SWRC called boomerville LOL.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on November 12, 2015 - 6:56pm.

I don't keep up with anything south of downtown, but very nice!! I love it.

We should have much more of this. Civita in Mission Valley is similar, incorporated more into existing 1970s sprawl. They are doing things like this in LA.

Urban planners are encouraging more of this now. It's wonderful. They really need to tear the urban plans developed in the 70s and 80s and star afresh.

I actually know a retired couple who traded their suburban house a large condo at Civita.

Submitted by spdrun on November 12, 2015 - 7:56pm.

Sadly those type of planned communities usually end up culturally dead, with chain stores gracing the ground floor retail spaces and no real community life. I'd sooner live in North Park (even the "bad" part) or Uni Heights.

Submitted by Svile1604 on November 12, 2015 - 8:34pm.

Interesting, do you have any references to support your claim? I have found that both " North Park" and " University Heights" boast a rather high transient population, but are undoubtedly rich in good drinks and eats.

The only reason I ask is that the small number of businesses that grace the ground floor of the "Promenade" of Mission Valley such as "Trisler's" seem to do relatively well. Are there any other examples in the greater San Diego area where this model has been an economic failure ( culture vitality aside)? Please don't take this as a defensive reply, just curiousity

Submitted by FlyerInHi on November 12, 2015 - 11:29pm.

spdrun wrote:
Sadly those type of planned communities usually end up culturally dead, with chain stores gracing the ground floor retail spaces and no real community life. I'd sooner live in North Park (even the "bad" part) or Uni Heights.

Spd, I'm with you on the real city. But for most Americans, planned development is just the way it is. The grove in LA has the highest sales per sf in the nation, I believe.

Planned is the American way. We just need to plan better. First, the separation of business and living has got to go. Imagine some high rises above UTC with a trolley plaza.

Submitted by spdrun on November 12, 2015 - 11:52pm.

I'm not sure if we CAN plan better. Besides, people who want that kind of environment gravitate towards older cities, not new build in San Diego.

Submitted by njtosd on November 13, 2015 - 4:13am.

FlyerInHi wrote:
[

The grove in LA has the highest sales per sf in the nation, I believe.

Nope, Bal Harbour Shops in FL has amost 50% more (~$3000/ sq ft vs ~$2000). But the Grove is second.

Submitted by spdrun on November 13, 2015 - 8:44am.

NYC and SF probably have some specific buildings going for $5000-10,000 psf.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on November 13, 2015 - 12:21pm.

spd, talking about planning, did you notice how we, in America, like planned development, but we want "free markets"? I don't know how they reconcile.

Maybe we should let landowners build whatever they want and the magic invisible hand of the free market will sort it all out. I think the Supreme Court needs to revisit the issue of the taking of landowners property rights through zoning.

You have a point that the older cities are experiencing revival. I was in downtown Knoxville, TN and was surprised how downtown has come back.

But planned development is the way forward. Aren't there new "fake" planned villages in NJ?

Submitted by spdrun on November 13, 2015 - 3:04pm.

^^^

Yes, there are planned villages and most of them are shit.

Submitted by bearishgurl on November 13, 2015 - 4:39pm.

Back from l-o-o-ong road trip and saw this thread.

South County already has way too many worker-bees trying to navigate I-5/I-805 to/from SD and points north during rush hours. It is patently ridiculous that Chula Vista has annexed itself 3 zip codes in the past 27.5 years (91915 in the last 13 years) growing from 52K to 278K in population and from 2 zip codes to 5 zip codes in that length of time. The traffic from I-805 east on H St, Telegraph Cyn Road and Palomar St (taking >40 minutes to go 12 miles during rush hours) is horrendous and the Eastlake shopping corridor full of ugly big box stores is a densely crowded h@llhole to get in and out of every single day of the week.

Whatever sh!thole "attached-home project" is "in the works" for Otay Ranch will be located <4 miles from the international border and no one can deny that fact. The city has absolutely no business approving any more subdivision permits. It still hasn't rehired all the employees it had to lay off after the deep crash of 91914/91915 residential RE several years ago. The type of buyer such a project will attract will be very marginal and may even likely purchase with "creative financing," if available to them (assuming they are Americans). Or they will be purchased by Mexican Nationals using all cash (IF the price "pencils out" for this group on this side of the border).

There are no "redeeming qualities" to that location (i.e. jobs, fine dining and tourist attractions, like Civita in MV offers) except possibly a view of the bright lights of Homeland Security operations and TJ . . . up close and personal.

Whatever units don't sell in a timely manner will end up getting dumped by the developer (either back to their lender or for pennies on the dollar or both). All this project will do (IF approved by City) is create a traffic-generating behemoth throughout the city as buyers who are in it for MR of up to 1.7% of assessed value of their unit PLUS one or more HOAs to pay dues to can't afford the $90+ month it will cost them to use their own (SR-125 ext) toll road.

I hope there is/are a reasonably intelligent councilperson(s) on the panel who is/are not afraid to put a spanner in the works to derail this dumber-than-dumb idea out of the gate, so City doesn't waste too much time on it. They have far more pressing problems to focus on than approving yet another substandard subdivision in lizardland.

Submitted by bearishgurl on November 13, 2015 - 5:47pm.

Svile1604 wrote:
Hello fellow Piggington subscribers....The project is known as Millenia (Milleniasd.com). A luxury apartment section of the community is almost finished. The website makes claims that it will bring the South County a new heart, and will be the next great place in San Diego. As the website tosses around "San Diego" and "South County" quite abit, I suspect they are wanting to stray away from using "Chula Vista" in their pitch.. . .

I just had a chance to peruse the developer's pipe dream of a gallery:

http://www.milleniasd.com/map-gallery/ga...

There's is even a drawing of a city bus in the mix delivering shoppers to an "upscale" shopper street scene.

Um, City (yes, this IS Chula Vista, no matter whose "sales pitch" we use) cut their bus service wa-a-a-ay back about two years ago and CVT's former level of service still has not resumed. Where are all these shoppers going to come from (in the shadow of the Otay Ranch Center which already has this style of shopping) to make this project a success??

Uh . . . using "Chula Vista" as opposed to Otay Mesa (in SD proper and just a stone's throw away from this proposed project) in the developer's description might be preferable, IMO. The next exit on I-805 is Palm Ave (less than 1 mile from Millenia, as the crow flies), which has had big box stores and chain stores in a long strip mall for about 13-14 years. Residents in that area want fast food, Kaiser and big box discount stores, NOT upscale specialty stores, private doctors and sit-down restaurants (requiring tipping). Mexican shoppers gravitate to the 3 Macy's and 2 JCP's (dept stores) in South County on the weekends for coupon sales and typically buy their dry goods (clothing, shoes, bedding, hshld items, etc) in bulk. If this ambitious project is approved in its entirety, it will be hard-pressed to get regular bus service from the trolley line (essential to attract many Mexican shoppers). Shoppers and diners who reside in other parts of the county aren't going to drive down there for "destination" shopping/dining because they have their own well-established places to shop and dine. And "boomers" (LOL Shoveler and FIH) have many, many options on where to retire .... namely, they can retire in Rosarito or Ensenada, right on the beach for LESS than the cost of a one-bdrm sh!thole in "Millenia" with shared walls and a 1.7% in MR bonds attached to it. This group can even retire in San Felipe or Cabo in a larger home than the typical beach house closer to the border for LESS.

I'm having a hard time seeing WHO this developer is trying to attract to a project like this. The wheel has already been invented down there and longtime owners in Otay Ranch are only JUST THIS YEAR inching out of being upside down on their homes.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on November 13, 2015 - 8:47pm.

oh, BG, you should retire in the woods already.

Once immigration is sorted out, and TPP is passed and implemented, San Diego and Tijuana could become a powerful bi-national city -- really the only large such city in North America. I imagine bright lights and big city.

Once marijuana is legalized in USA and Mexico, the ridiculous war on drugs will end, American tourists will return to Tijuana which will become a great party destination for day-trippers. Lots of activity, movements, and trade back and forth will be great for the border region.

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