Land lines

User Forum Topic
Submitted by moneymaker on April 21, 2016 - 2:14pm

If I got as many telemarketers calling my cell phone as I get calling my land line I would be pretty pissed off. As of the first of the year seems like I've gotten a lot of telemarketers calling even though I'm on the "do not call list", I checked and it never expires. Doesn't bother me too much but drives the wife crazy. If it happened on my cell phone I think I would have to get a smart watch, either before or after some kind of retaliation. Is everybody out there with a landline getting these calls? Is the do not call law another toothless law?

Submitted by Hatfield on April 21, 2016 - 2:20pm.

Yeah, we still have a landline but I pretty much use it exclusively for outgoing calls. Only my dad and a few other people call the land line. I get a lot of telemarketing calls but i never pick up unless I recognize the caller ID, and nobody ever leaves a message.

I'm on the do not call list, but that law is pretty much unenforceable.

For my business I use a Google voice number that rings through to my cell phone, and I do get occasional telemarketing calls to that line. I can see that they're dialing the business number, not the cell number.

Submitted by no_such_reality on April 21, 2016 - 5:08pm.

yep. Phone rings all day long. bs sales calls. Political organizations (exempt). Charities (exempt). Bs charities. Scams from overseas. And all sorts of ba for 'companies working with "county programs)

You can tell the solar places you've already got solar and they still call back week after week.

Submitted by spdrun on April 21, 2016 - 8:38pm.

Three words for you all -- special information tones. You know the doo-dah-dee sequence before "the number you have reached, EIGHT-SIX-SEVEN-FIVE-THREE-OH-NINE has been disconnected?"

Record this on your voicemail, faintly. Many telemarketers' robosoftware will think it's a non-working number and flag the shit out of it. Actual humans will hear your voice over the tone set and still leave a message.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:IC_SI...

Submitted by moneymaker on April 22, 2016 - 7:49am.

Thank you spdrun I've got it on my answering machine now. Will find out how it works over the next 2 days. Does it matter how many times the phone rings first?

Submitted by spdrun on April 22, 2016 - 7:59am.

I think the idea is that they at least won't leave automated messages. 4 rings is fine.

Submitted by cvmom on April 25, 2016 - 8:39am.

Will be very interested to hear if this works, can't wait to try it out if so.

Submitted by La Jolla Renter on April 25, 2016 - 9:07am.

I was getting telemarketing calls in the middle of the night on my cell phone, which piss me off 100x more than during the day. Then I finally learned how to turn on do not disturb on my iphone between 10pm and 6am.

The beauty is it lets callers through on a second attempt. So in the case of an emergency, someone trying to reach you will obviously try you back when they get your VM. What a great feature.

Has anyone else noticed a distinct reduction in text spam ads. Seems they really dropped off for me 6 or so months ago.

Submitted by carli on April 25, 2016 - 9:12am.

Best solution to this problem is a new free service called Nomorobo. We have lousy cell service near our home so we've held on to our land line and were getting TONS of telemarketing calls daily. I read about Nomorobo in Consumer Reports magazine, where it was highly recommended and set it up a couple months ago. Works like a charm! Love it. Check it out: https://www.nomorobo.com/signup

EDIT: Nomorobo somehow knows to let some robocallers, such as my kids' schools, through. Details in video here: https://www.nomorobo.com/

Submitted by poorgradstudent on April 25, 2016 - 9:14am.

My only land line is on my desk at my work.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 25, 2016 - 11:00am.

Such a waste of money to have a land line. A penny saved is a penny earned.

Tmobile and ATT wireless have wifi calling when cell coverage is bad.

Submitted by spdrun on April 25, 2016 - 11:20am.

It still sounds like crap compared to a good landline phone. Ideally a 2500-set, designed to last for decades and not sound like you're talking underwater while drunk.

Personally, given the choice, I'd ditch the cell phone and keep a landline. Even if it's a VoIP landline. Because, really, who the fuck needs an electronic leash? The trend of needing a personal tracking device with you 24/7 is execrable.

Interestingly, the new LinkNYC terminals mostly provide wifi, but they also do free calling within the US via Vonage. So I could live without a cell, and just check voicemail occasionally from a Link if I'm outdoors, or from my laptop if I'm indoors/working.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 25, 2016 - 12:01pm.

Landlines don't sound better. IP telephony sounds better. Did you try FaceTime audio, Viber, Skype or services like that?

Tracking is a problem but convenience is best. I'm typing this on smart phone while doing other things.

Submitted by spdrun on April 25, 2016 - 12:22pm.

It's not the service, it's the quality of the electronics/mic inside the phone. And I choose not to use any service that allows for video conferencing, because people will want me to turn on the camera. Video makes me way too self-conscious. Either talk on the phone, meet in person, or STFU.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 25, 2016 - 12:48pm.

You can use whatever you want. But a landline is expensive, not portable and limited to voice only. You can give your money to the Bells if that's what you want.

Submitted by spdrun on April 25, 2016 - 2:25pm.

If I never sent or received another text message, I'd be a happy man. I'd love to have an auto-response. "Fn call. Ths lne dsnt recv txts u fn mllnil twttr twt"

Real life > Phone > Texting. Too many people think they can hold conversations via texting, and this is irritating as all hell.

Submitted by Hatfield on April 25, 2016 - 4:04pm.

I prefer talking on a landline not because of the sound quality, but because of the latency on cell phone connections. That little delay irritates me. I guess I'm too impatient to wait an extra 100 mSec.

Submitted by carli on April 25, 2016 - 4:18pm.

I wish I could give up my landline but there's no way. I especially can't conduct business or talk to elderly relatives on my cell connection because the call inevitably gets dropped at some point during the conversation. We live near a canyon where the coverage is spotty. I guess I could buy one of those signal boosters, but my neighbor has one and he says his calls still get dropped. Having two numbers (and two bills) is a bummer, but I don't see another way.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 25, 2016 - 5:16pm.

Carli, did you ever try IP telephone like Vonage?
Smart phones now have wifi calling ability.
Try the Magicjack app for free and see if you like the quality.

I drive a lot and I'm always on the phone. I always use an original corded headset. Not Bluetooth.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 25, 2016 - 5:33pm.

spdrun wrote:
If I never sent or received another text message, I'd be a happy man. I'd love to have an auto-response. "Fn call. Ths lne dsnt recv txts u fn mllnil twttr twt"

Real life > Phone > Texting. Too many people think they can hold conversations via texting, and this is irritating as all hell.

Years before the iphone and before texting became popular in the states, I would travel abroad and buy SIM cards. I told friends who joined me "if you're too cheap buy a SIM card your might not use, then if we get separated, you take a taxi back to the hotel and check messages. Nobody is babysitting and waiting for one another. Whoever gets lost is responsible for catching up with everybody else." Needless to say, a SIM card is well worth avoiding the cost of taxi rides back and forth, not counting hours of wasted time.

spd, if you like it the old fashioned way, have at it.

BTW. I support Verizon and the Bells in phasing out landlines when it makes economic sense. No need to maintain a duplicate systems at great costs for a few diehards.

Submitted by ltsddd on April 25, 2016 - 5:30pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:
Carli, did you ever try IP telephone like Vonage?

Try Ooma. The device costs less than $100. Only cost after that is the fcc taxes and fees that add up to about $4/mo.

Submitted by bearishgurl on April 25, 2016 - 6:23pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:
. . . I support Verizon and the Bells in phasing out landlines when it makes economic sense. No need to maintain a duplicate systems at great costs for a few diehards.
brian, you forgot about fax machines. Many (most?) businesses still use them and I have a dedicated landline for that purpose only.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 25, 2016 - 6:44pm.

You can scan to PDF. Tile companies and law firms do that. It's cheaper to buy a new scanner than to pay the monthly fees. We need to get on with the world.

BTW businesses can get digital lines that look like POTS. POTS is so anachronistic.

Submitted by spdrun on April 25, 2016 - 6:59pm.

POTS is also very reliable. As in works w/o trouble 99.999% of the time. By design.

Yeah, you can email. But some customers and businesses still work by fax. Not sure why, but that's the way the world rolls. If you want their business, you have to roll with it.

You can also get a virtual fax, of course, but that usually involves fees.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 25, 2016 - 7:10pm.

Maintaining a POTS network is like keeping an Oldsmobile going. Makes no sense to make the parts. Start shutting it down beginning in small towns where there aren't economies of scale.

A POTS business line is about $35. Virtual fax on an ad hoc basis is maybe $15. And more convenient.

Submitted by spdrun on April 25, 2016 - 7:44pm.

Except you might not want some kloud-krap outside company storing sensitive faxes for you. To provide stable Internet, one needs some sort of wiring to premises. They can provide POTS over that at virtually no cost, doesn't have to be a traditional twisted pair.

But if ones use a separate channel for POTS vs Internet which gets priority, it does away with any latency or QoS issues that VoIP has. Example: Verizon FiOS. It's POTS over fiber, not VoIP since voice doesn't use an IP network.

Submitted by carli on April 25, 2016 - 8:15pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:
Carli, did you ever try IP telephone like Vonage?
Smart phones now have wifi calling ability.
Try the Magicjack app for free and see if you like the quality.

I drive a lot and I'm always on the phone. I always use an original corded headset. Not Bluetooth.

FlyerInHi, I've often considered a VoIP phone but last year, we got an incredible bundled deal from Time Warner when we left ATT Uverse. We only pay $103 (including all taxes/fees) for TV, internet and landline. When I asked what it would cost to take out the phone part of the package, Time Warner told me the a la carte price for TV and internet alone would be higher.

We have a very basic TV plan, but don't want anything more, and we get great internet speed (I just did a speed test and got 43 mbps download speed on my laptop and my husband usually gets over 70 on his iPad). I don't need the line for a fax as I've never had an issue just scanning/emailing, but will keep my landline as long as I have this deal.

Time Warner has been great - much better than AT&T was, and they just went through an upgrade in our area, which significantly increased our internet speed. It's made a huge difference, especially with several people using it, including teens/college kids streaming stuff all the time.

But it's one of those things that I'm continually re-assessing, as I know our Time Warner deal won't last forever, so thanks for the info. I'll check out Vonage, Magicjack, Ooma, etc again next time around.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 25, 2016 - 8:55pm.

I'm all for POTS over fiber, coax or hybrid Att Uverse type. The old twisted pair network should be shut down to save money.

But really, IP telephone is so good now... Why not fully phase it in and only maintain one network. Customers can still use their POTS at home if they wish. They don't need to be any the wiser.

Submitted by bearishgurl on April 25, 2016 - 10:39pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:
You can scan to PDF. Tile companies and law firms do that. It's cheaper to buy a new scanner than to pay the monthly fees. We need to get on with the world.

BTW businesses can get digital lines that look like POTS. POTS is so anachronistic.

Um, maybe very large law firms have those $5-35K standalone copy machines which can automatically scan reams at a time but the medium-sized or small firm does not. Fax service is a legal method of service between law firms if they both agree to it in writing early on in the case. Medical and dental offices and all kinds of gubment agencies still use fax all day every day. Yes, even the IRS. In some depts of the IRS, fax or snail mail is the only way to send them anything.

I personally scan items to pdf for e-mail if that is an accepted way of receipt of the party I'm sending it to. But I often have to reduce the size of each pdf prior to e-mailing in order to have the document "fit" into the "free" e-mail services I use online. This could be a 2-5 step process (versus just faxing it) and a lot of businesses (large and small) don't have a person to scan each document individually (or in a small batch) on garden variety scanners purchased at Office Depot. Then you need conversion and compression software ($100 and up) and someone who understands how to use it. Scanning and e-mailing can take half a day and can be a PITA. Especially if you have a lot of documents or a very large document to send which is on a commercial or government form and was never originated from MS Office software or other WP software. Faxing is easier and faster for the majority of document sending .... especially in bulk.

It's just not practical in real life with every agency and business one has to deal with to scan and e-mail everything without access to a sophisticated standalone commercial copier/scanner.

Submitted by La Jolla Renter on April 26, 2016 - 8:31am.

I ditched my fax machine a year a go. My faxes come strait to my email via voip (ring central). I have a scan snap ix500 on my desk. It scans, saves to hard drive and emails out simultaneously. Amazing how fast it scans. Best $400 I have spent in a long time.

Way better system than a fax machine, even if the phone line for the fax is free.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on April 26, 2016 - 8:58am.

BG, you need the acrobat software and a feeding scanner (about $300 -$400). I scan all my documents and acrobat software makes very small files.
It's cheaper than paying for a phone line month after month and supplies for your fax machine.

Shall we mention all the clutter paper creates? I keep only keep a few original documents.

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