I want to scrreeeammmm

User Forum Topic
Submitted by SD Transplant on June 2, 2010 - 1:31pm

Published: May 28, 2010 at 7:19 P

LOS ANGELES, May 28 (UPI) -- A Cerritos, Calif., woman was charged with welfare fraud for receiving more than $60,000 in benefits while hiding assets including a Maserati, officials say.

Tangela Ridgeway, 35, was arrested with eight others this week in a massive welfare fraud sweep for receiving benefits while concealing ownership of a home, business, a Nissan SUV, the upscale 2006 sports car and other vehicles, the Los Angeles Times reported Friday.

The Los Angeles County district attorney's office says she is charged with 16 counts of welfare fraud including aid by misrepresentation and perjury by false application for aid, and 14 counts of perjury by declaration.

In court Friday Ridgeway's bail was set at $395,000. If convicted, she faces a maximum term of 19 years in state prison, the Times said.

Another of those arrested and charged, Alicia Garcia, 51, also is accused of major fraud. She was charged with one count of false statements to receive healthcare, three counts of aid by misrepresentation and four counts of perjury by false application for aid.
Garcia allegedly received more than $136,000 in public assistance benefits from January 2002 to April 2010. During the time she claimed benefits, Garcia allegedly failed to report her real income, ownership of property, vehicles and bank accounts and also failed to report a spouse in the home.

Garcia is being held on $45,000 bail. If convicted as charged, she faces a maximum state prison term of nine years

Submitted by jpinpb on June 2, 2010 - 1:34pm.

Drop in the bucket compared to some of the fraud dealings I've been seeing in the real estate market.

Submitted by blahblahblah on June 2, 2010 - 1:39pm.

OMG! $136K dollars over 8 years!!! OMG! OMG! OMG! That's more than $17K per year! Stop the presses! This needs to be on the front page!!!

The bankster boys have gotten away with kazillions and bought Long Island getaways, megayachts, etc... and we're worried about some ghetto welfare scammers. Yeah, that's why the country's going down the tubes.

We are all doomed.

Submitted by desmond on June 2, 2010 - 2:33pm.

Nobody is saying "we are all doomed", but taking welfare money and having a Masarati in the garage is pretty pathetic. btw, when I was around 17 I was driving down the street in Escondido and some old truck blew past the stop sign and plowed into me. My dad showed up and asked the driver how he was going to pay for the accident, the drivers response, "don't expect me to pay for it, I'm on welfare".

Submitted by flu on June 2, 2010 - 3:24pm.

desmond wrote:
Nobody is saying "we are all doomed", but taking welfare money and having a Masarati in the garage is pretty pathetic. btw, when I was around 17 I was driving down the street in Escondido and some old truck blew past the stop sign and plowed into me. My dad showed up and asked the driver how he was going to pay for the accident, the drivers response, "don't expect me to pay for it, I'm on welfare".

I think it's down there with keeping a spouse that passed away in your home so one can collect the social security check. Also, what about all those incidents in L.A. hospital corruption about fake billing....
http://articles.latimes.com/2008/aug/07/...

The irony to this, is that had it been the other way around, in which you accidentally bumped into that person (even if the damage would have been minor with no injury), I bet he would have been sueing you and your parent's asses off...

Submitted by briansd1 on June 2, 2010 - 3:25pm.

jpinpb wrote:
Drop in the bucket compared to some of the fraud dealings I've been seeing in the real estate market.

Yes, jpinpb, this is a drop in the bucket compared to the what the fraudsters got away with in Real Estate.

At least this welfare fraudster will do jail time. That's more than can be said with regard to the real estate and financial fraud.

Submitted by jpinpb on June 2, 2010 - 3:28pm.

briansd1 wrote:
At least this welfare fraudster will do jail time. That's more than can be said with regard to the real estate and financial fraud.

Yeah. Sure does seem like there are untouchables out there doing far worse and getting away w/it.

Submitted by Aecetia on June 2, 2010 - 10:03pm.

I would think any jail time would be limited and maybe even probation and restitution. Good luck collecting that.

Submitted by briansd1 on June 2, 2010 - 11:27pm.

Aecetia wrote:
I would think any jail time would be limited and maybe even probation and restitution. Good luck collecting that.

Let's put it in perspective here.

At least that welfare cheat will have a criminal record.

Mortgage fraud and financial fraud in far greater amounts was rampant. And those guys are getting off scot-free with nary a slap.

Submitted by ucodegen on June 2, 2010 - 11:55pm.

CONCHO wrote:

The bankster boys have gotten away with kazillions and bought Long Island getaways, megayachts, etc... and we're worried about some ghetto welfare scammers. Yeah, that's why the country's going down the tubes.

So that makes it right for people to commit welfare fraud? One wrong makes another wrong ok to commit?

Considering that a Maserati was involved, I don't think we are dealing with 'ghetto welfare scammers'. With multiple vehicles, home etc.. they seem pretty well off.

So just how did bankster boys get away with all that you claim, and which bankster boys are you talking about? Remember, Bernard Madoff is not a 'bankster'.. he ran an investment fund.

Submitted by blahblahblah on June 3, 2010 - 6:32am.

So that makes it right for people to commit welfare fraud? One wrong makes another wrong ok to commit?

Puh-leeze. The point is that these type of low-level scammers don't do the same amount of damage as the ones at the top. AND THE PERSON IN THE STORY HAS BEEN CAUGHT AND WILL GO TO JAIL. Meanwhile the bankster boys are sailing to the Mediterranean on their megayachts, banging supermodels and snorting cocaine WITH YOUR 401K MONEY. Entiende?

Submitted by Ash Housewares on June 3, 2010 - 8:29am.

I bet she has a pitbull...

Submitted by UCGal on June 3, 2010 - 9:40am.

Ash Housewares wrote:
I bet she has a pitbull...

THAT made me laugh.

Submitted by yojimbo on June 3, 2010 - 9:54am.

I remember way way back in the day when a wrong was a wrong. Now it's all couched in class warfare relativistic arguments.

Since the "banksters" stole billions I guess that pretty much leaves EVERYONE else free to do what they like relatively speaking. They may steal hundreds, thousands, or even millions, but hey it's NO WHERE NEAR the amount those banksters stole! In fact, it's a veritable drop in the bucket!

I suppose there could be millions of non-bankster people scamming the system in every way imaginable for amounts that could reach into the hundreds of billions but hey, as long as you only look at the damage each individual scammer does it ain't so bad.

Submitted by Arraya on June 3, 2010 - 10:28am.

yojimbo wrote:
I remember way way back in the day when a wrong was a wrong. Now it's all couched in class warfare relativistic arguments.
.

It was very easy to hide information years ago. People were stuck in the false reality of pureness of money power and actually taught to worship it. Today, it's harder to hide the crimes of our rulers as it is on the world stage via the internet-information technology. And yes, it will metastasizes through justification. The genie is out of the bottle now and there is no putting it back. Innocence lost

Submitted by briansd1 on June 3, 2010 - 12:22pm.

CONCHO wrote:
AND THE PERSON IN THE STORY HAS BEEN CAUGHT AND WILL GO TO JAIL.

That was not very smart of that woman to keep a Maserati and bank accounts in her name.

Databases talk to each other. So don't keep any assets in your name if you want welfare.

BTW, medical services are not free. There's a County lien on your assets for the amounts paid on your behalf.

http://www.sdcounty.ca.gov/hhsa/programs...

Submitted by ucodegen on June 3, 2010 - 12:04pm.

CONCHO wrote:
Puh-leeze. The point is that these type of low-level scammers don't do the same amount of damage as the ones at the top. AND THE PERSON IN THE STORY HAS BEEN CAUGHT AND WILL GO TO JAIL. Meanwhile the bankster boys are sailing to the Mediterranean on their megayachts, banging supermodels and snorting cocaine WITH YOUR 401K MONEY. Entiende?

Again.. who are these 'banksters' that you are talking about? Name the names! It is easy to create a 'straw man' to then attack to justify your position. Its called a straw man argument. Lets see if you can make the straw man real.. so Puh-leeze right back to you!!

Submitted by Sandi Egan on June 3, 2010 - 12:11pm.

SD Transplant wrote:
If convicted, she faces a maximum term of 19 years in state prison

Right. $60K was not enough, so now we are stuck with paying all her bills for another 19 years. That's the way to amend the state budget.

Submitted by briansd1 on June 3, 2010 - 12:21pm.

ucodegen wrote:

Again.. who are these 'banksters' that you are talking about? Name the names! It is easy to create a 'straw man' to then attack to justify your position. Its called a straw man argument. Lets see if you can make the straw man real.. so Puh-leeze right back to you!!

If the authorities wanted to catch the mortgage fraudsters, at least at the lower levels, all they need to do is audit the loan applications, and compare them to the tax returns.

Someone could write a computer program for that. And we'd need to build many more prisons.

Submitted by briansd1 on June 8, 2010 - 1:47pm.

Here's another story for you to scream about.

Hawthorne Mayor Larry Guidi, who had led the city for nearly two decades, was charged Tuesday in connection with stealing a commercial food mixer from the local school district because he allegedly needed more dough for his home pizza oven.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/20...

Submitted by CA renter on June 13, 2010 - 2:28am.

Okay, just saw this from brian's link:

Under pressure from local community leaders, the federal Office for Civil Rights will look at whether low academic achievement of African American students results from discrimination -- intentional or not -- by the Los Angeles Unified School District.

“It is unfortunate that it required the civil rights community to demand from the Department of Education that children be provided educational equality,” added Lee, who is president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference of Greater Los Angeles.

Officials with the federal agency said in March that they would focus on English learners at L.A. Unified because the district has about 220,000 -- more than any other school system in the country. English learners, most of them Latino, make up a third of students in the nation’s second-largest school system. Black students make up 10.8% of enrollment.

“The message being sent to Los Angeles’ African American community is that the devastation to black students being caused by the failure of public education is of little consequence to you or your department,” a coalition of black leaders wrote in a May 21 letter to the federal Department of Education.

The expanded inquiry will compare five largely black elementary schools in Carson, View Park and Hawthorne with five largely white elementary schools in Bel-Air, Tarzana, Studio City and Encino.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/20...
---------------------

Yes, this is off-topic, but since there have been a number of "school" threads here... ;)

Sounds like an article from The Onion.

For those who aren't familiar with L.A., they are going to compare schools in Beverly Hills (and other, very high-end areas) with those from some of the roughest parts of L.A. because it simply must be the schools' fault that their precious children aren't performing well [/sarcasm]. Nobody ever bothers to look in the mirror (it can't be the parents' fault!).

Submitted by briansd1 on June 16, 2010 - 12:33pm.

This is much more worth screaming about:

Mortgage company executive arrested in $1.9-billion fraud case
Lee Bentley Farkas, 57, former chairman of Florida-based TBW, was charged with bank, wire and securities fraud after allegedly trying to defraud the TARP bailout fund.

http://www.kansascity.com/2010/06/16/202...

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-mo...

Submitted by davelj on June 16, 2010 - 5:33pm.

briansd1 wrote:
This is much more worth screaming about:

Mortgage company executive arrested in $1.9-billion fraud case
Lee Bentley Farkas, 57, former chairman of Florida-based TBW, was charged with bank, wire and securities fraud after allegedly trying to defraud the TARP bailout fund.

http://www.kansascity.com/2010/06/16/202...

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-mortgage-fraud-20100617,0,1196885.story

$1.9 billion fraud... was that wrong?

Submitted by IForget on June 16, 2010 - 8:57pm.

briansd1 wrote:
This is much more worth screaming about:

Mortgage company executive arrested in $1.9-billion fraud case
Lee Bentley Farkas, 57, former chairman of Florida-based TBW, was charged with bank, wire and securities fraud after allegedly trying to defraud the TARP bailout fund.

http://www.kansascity.com/2010/06/16/202...

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-mortgage-fraud-20100617,0,1196885.story

Thanks for keeping it real, Brian. It's amazing how people have been so brainwashed to be outraged over modest welfare fraud ($60K) and will totally ignore billions in bankster fraud. Incredible.

Just to put this in perspective, for anyone on this thread who is outraged and 'wanting to screeeammmm' about $60,000 in welfare fraud, you should be 31,666 times as outraged at $1,900,000,000 in bankster fraud. So if you screamed for even 1 second over the welfare fraud, you should scream for 8 hours and 48 minutes over the bankster fraud. So to the outraged, you better get started screaming.

Submitted by IForget on June 16, 2010 - 9:08pm.

Delete

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 16, 2010 - 9:27pm.

i think there's some sense in which we identify with the scale of the welfare fraud, feel like we could have dne that where the larger fraud is out of our reach. it seems worse because it is closer to home.

Submitted by sdrealtor on June 16, 2010 - 9:32pm.

I would venture that we are outraged even more at these crooks however there is a very small number of people perpetuating fraud on that level. There are hundreds of thousands committing welfare fraud so collectively it is an issue of the same magnitude.

Submitted by Cube on June 16, 2010 - 9:39pm.

Sandi Egan wrote:
SD Transplant wrote:
If convicted, she faces a maximum term of 19 years in state prison

Right. $60K was not enough, so now we are stuck with paying all her bills for another 19 years. That's the way to amend the state budget.

Right. And, I'm betting it would be waaaaay cheaper to just keep her on welfare for 19 years than to prosecute and incarcerate her.

Submitted by IForget on June 16, 2010 - 9:45pm.

sdrealtor wrote:
I would venture that we are outraged even more at these crooks however there is a very small number of people perpetuating fraud on that level. There are hundreds of thousands committing welfare fraud so collectively it is an issue of the same magnitude.

Do you have any proof of this or are you just talking out your ass?

Submitted by sdrealtor on June 16, 2010 - 9:57pm.

Well I worked for the City of Philadelphia about 20 years ago and saw proof of tens of thousands of cases of welfare fraud. With a little extrapolation across the US population it was easy to get there so I guess that I'm just half assed.

Bottom line - all fraud is a problem and I guess that the size of one's crimes dont chnage the fact that they are all criminals large and small.

Submitted by briansd1 on June 16, 2010 - 10:16pm.

sdrealtor, welfare fraud used to be a problem, for sure.

But since 1996 it's no longer a big problem.

Welfare, also known as TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families) is now limited to 5 years in a lifetime.

Medicaid/Medi-cal benefits trigger a lien that needs to be paid back by the estate of the recipient upon death.

There is also a lien that attaches to the current and future property of CMS (County Medical Services) recipients.
http://www.co.san-diego.ca.us/hhsa/progr...

In contrast, financial fraud during the bubble was probably something like $1 trillion (or who knows how high). That was enough to pay for the Health Care Reform bill and enough to pay for the Iraq/Afghanistan war.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.