huge topic:Americans keep getting fatter

User Forum Topic
Submitted by desmond on June 29, 2010 - 3:37pm

http://news.yahoo.com/s/hsn/20100629/hl_...

Easy access to fast, cheap food, to busy to cook, many reasons why, and it is getting worse.

Submitted by NeetaT on July 1, 2010 - 7:40pm.

Good, it just makes me look better.

Submitted by CA renter on July 1, 2010 - 10:27pm.

XBoxBoy wrote:
Not all Americans are getting fatter. I've lost 38 lbs in the last year, so there!

SkinnyBoxBoy

Congratulations, XBoxBoy! That's fantastic! :)

How did you do it?

Submitted by ocrenter on July 3, 2010 - 9:30am.

The obesity epidemic is the result of a perfect confluence of conditions in this country since the 60's:

--families gradually moved from single income to double income or single parent households, translating to less in home cooking and more take outs/eating out or reliance on easy to cook processed food.

--expansion of suburbia, which also translate to increased reliance on cars and increased commute time. this eliminate walking as integral part of daily life.

--the increased reliance on restaurant food/processed microwave ready food means increased amount of dollar in that area. this drives competition for this expending dollar. the expending food industry realized if they maximize taste (increase in grease and salt), maximize portion size, and improve efficiency (thus lower cost), they can maximize their profit.

The above is how we got here, here is how things will unfold.

expect the obesity crisis to get worse for the foreseeable future. we have an entire generation of children raised on sweets and fat. their brains are programmed to respond to sweets and fat, in essence they are lost. if they are not fat, they will be once they reach adulthood. this generation will likely reach 50% obesity rate, most of them will likely start having diagnosis of diabetes and cholesterol problems in their 30's to 40's, a lot of them will have heart disease and strokes in their 50's and 60's, a drastic worsening in comparison to the generation before them.

the problem will get so bad that government reaction to fat and sweets will rival that of smoking. it will no longer be a partisan issue because the problem would be so overwhelming. the rate for heart failure, amputation, and dialysis for what would have been perfectly healthy 50 year olds would be staggering in comparison to the prior generations. the argument that government would be infringing on personal rights with sugar tax and public campaigns and strict regulations on food would hold very little water.

luckily, the generation after this lost obese generation will fare much better. much like the generation after the anti-smoking era, they will realize food is not to be abused and parents need to be parents by restricting exposure of their children to harmful food.

but make no mistake about it, there will be a lot of casualties and a lot of money spent on the way to health for this country.

Submitted by briansd1 on July 3, 2010 - 10:02am.

eavesdropper wrote:

As for what Americans in reduced circumstances will eat, I don't agree that most Americans eat fast food and junk food because it's cheap. I don't think it IS cheap. I think many just don't want to cook, or know how to prepare food.

I agree that junk food (prepared food) is not cheap.

It's cheaper to cook from scratch.

Submitted by briansd1 on July 3, 2010 - 10:04am.

ocrenter wrote:

but make no mistake about it, there will be a lot of casualties and a lot of money spent on the way to health for this country.

That is a very good assessment of the situation, ocrenter.

Too bad that millions of Americans will become collateral damage of inaction. Too bad that a huge portion of our country's wealth will be squandered away before we act.

Submitted by Ricechex on July 3, 2010 - 1:44pm.

ocrenter wrote:
The obesity epidemic is the result of a perfect confluence of conditions in this country since the 60's:

--families gradually moved from single income to double income or single parent households, translating to less in home cooking and more take outs/eating out or reliance on easy to cook processed food.

--expansion of suburbia, which also translate to increased reliance on cars and increased commute time. this eliminate walking as integral part of daily life.

--the increased reliance on restaurant food/processed microwave ready food means increased amount of dollar in that area. this drives competition for this expending dollar. the expending food industry realized if they maximize taste (increase in grease and salt), maximize portion size, and improve efficiency (thus lower cost), they can maximize their profit.

The above is how we got here, here is how things will unfold.

expect the obesity crisis to get worse for the foreseeable future. we have an entire generation of children raised on sweets and fat. their brains are programmed to respond to sweets and fat, in essence they are lost. if they are not fat, they will be once they reach adulthood. this generation will likely reach 50% obesity rate, most of them will likely start having diagnosis of diabetes and cholesterol problems in their 30's to 40's, a lot of them will have heart disease and strokes in their 50's and 60's, a drastic worsening in comparison to the generation before them.

the problem will get so bad that government reaction to fat and sweets will rival that of smoking. it will no longer be a partisan issue because the problem would be so overwhelming. the rate for heart failure, amputation, and dialysis for what would have been perfectly healthy 50 year olds would be staggering in comparison to the prior generations. the argument that government would be infringing on personal rights with sugar tax and public campaigns and strict regulations on food would hold very little water.

luckily, the generation after this lost obese generation will fare much better. much like the generation after the anti-smoking era, they will realize food is not to be abused and parents need to be parents by restricting exposure of their children to harmful food.

but make no mistake about it, there will be a lot of casualties and a lot of money spent on the way to health for this country.

Yes, nice assessment OC. Absolutely true. Did you know that back in they day, the native born Hawaiians were by and large a healthy people? When the corporations came in, their own food became too expensive for them, and they ate a lot of fast food. They have huge problems with diabetes, cholesterol levels, and obesity now.

Submitted by CardiffBaseball on July 4, 2010 - 12:07am.

OC my only problem is the insistence that eating fat (I am cutting out the sweets part) is what causes fat. There is plenty of evidence out there that the growth in starchy foods is the bigger culprit.

Now when I say starches I include the HFCS type foods which, as you point out, are probably heavily represented in the restaurant industry.

Eating fat is quite satiating and tends to keep one from splurging later. If the complaint is that the variety is lacking, then yes this is true... However one could eat a hunk of steak at each meal 3-4 times a day with some broccoli and possibly a small portion of a brown rice and do perfectly fine despite the fat content in the beef.

Now, I might agree that if you ate a Qtr Pounder from McDonalds every day 3 times a day, you are likely getting a piece of beef that was drenched in salt. Thus it won't hurt you occasionally but daily intake might not be so good.

Eggs, Cheese, Butter, Red Meat, broccoli, and 1-2 pieces of fruit a day is actually a pretty damn smart way to eat if you can handle the boredom. Chicken as well as long as you don't get too hungry (because the lack of fat makes it less filling)

The key is you have to cut calories and do it in a way that keeps you going. If you want to go all-low-fat and you like eating that way more power to you, nothing wrong with it, but there are some eating a fairly high fat-content who are otherwise pretty damn healthy. (Check out the folks at Zero-Carb the leader runs half-marathons).

Submitted by NotCranky on July 4, 2010 - 8:35am.

CardiffBaseball wrote:
OC my only problem is the insistence that eating fat (I am cutting out the sweets part) is what causes fat. There is plenty of evidence out there that the growth in starchy foods is the bigger culprit.

Now when I say starches I include the HFCS type foods which, as you point out, are probably heavily represented in the restaurant industry.

Eating fat is quite satiating and tends to keep one from splurging later. If the complaint is that the variety is lacking, then yes this is true... However one could eat a hunk of steak at each meal 3-4 times a day with some broccoli and possibly a small portion of a brown rice and do perfectly fine despite the fat content in the beef.

Now, I might agree that if you ate a Qtr Pounder from McDonalds every day 3 times a day, you are likely getting a piece of beef that was drenched in salt. Thus it won't hurt you occasionally but daily intake might not be so good.

Eggs, Cheese, Butter, Red Meat, broccoli, and 1-2 pieces of fruit a day is actually a pretty damn smart way to eat if you can handle the boredom. Chicken as well as long as you don't get too hungry (because the lack of fat makes it less filling)

The key is you have to cut calories and do it in a way that keeps you going. If you want to go all-low-fat and you like eating that way more power to you, nothing wrong with it, but there are some eating a fairly high fat-content who are otherwise pretty damn healthy. (Check out the folks at Zero-Carb the leader runs half-marathons).

People who train for half marathons are going to be thin pretty much no matter what they eat and many of them do it to cope with eating disorders.It's pretty hard to eat and run at the same time. If they don't make other changes, they will be fat again when they can't run. Many moderate people who exercise much less never gain weight. I would want to take notes from the latter group.

I don't think the food "this or that" is so much at the issue.
If people ate somewhere in the ballpark of what they need and are moderately active that would take care of it for most. Dieting and extreme excercise or any of the other "solutions" would not be necessary. I think this is really where it's nice to be.

But we don't.We eat too much of the right and the wrong things.

Here are some things I think might help:
Tired = go to bed.
Bored= Do something interesting
Other feelings= Deal w/your life
Hungry= eat something,and most of the time have it be something recognizable as part of an animal or plant.

Of course for the eating part there needs to be occasional adjustment something short of a Yo Yo syndrome. Almost everyone eats and drinks too much sometimes, including habitually thin, relatively healthy people. If it doesn't tend to just average out with periods accidental under eating and the occasional super healthy meals with your prius driving liberal friends, then a few moderate adjustments can be made. Special diets always seem to work best for the guru preaching them who are often making a living off that preaching. Of course running the half marathons might actually be what makes it appear to work.

Submitted by GH on July 4, 2010 - 8:42am.

I have lost 25 lbs in the last 18 months. My secret? NO CUBICLE JOB!!!

Of course I have also lost my shirt, but seriously I suspect that longer work hours and sedentary high pressure jobs are a big factor in weight gain.

That and we cut sugar. NO cake, gummy bears, soda .. Pretty much anything where the first ingrediant is sugar.

Lastly no one really knows the impact of all our genetically modified foods, and substances like BGH etc.

Submitted by jpinpb on July 4, 2010 - 9:49am.

Just wanted to share something that I've been going through. I had a problem w/gluten and had to eliminate all flour products. Do you know how hard it is for an italian to not eat pizza and pasta? In any case, I've lost weight and I think it's a combination of sedentary lifestyle AND too much carbs. I think anyone who eliminates carbs even for a month will see results, weight loss and more enegery. But that is really hard and takes major discipline and willpower. Breads, bagels, pizza, pasta, etc, etc. It's like an addiction.

Submitted by zzz on July 4, 2010 - 10:11am.

Has anyone watched Food Inc? Worthwhile to watch as are some of the books written by Michael Pollan. The movie argues that fast food IS cheaper to eat than if you were to buy healthy food and cook it yourself. This family could feed a family of 4 or 5 on a fast food dollar menu for say $7 a meal.

The correlation between poverty and obesity is high. I do believe it is very challenging for a family at poverty or near it can find it difficult to afford fresh food.

Many people are ignorant when it comes to what is healthy. There is also a huge laziness factor and I also believe that people like instant gratification. Just like we have a problem in our society with overconsumption of material goods, people overconsume food they feel tastes good. The same lack of discipline is pervasive in all aspects of their life.

They think that eating a highly processed frozen dinner with the marketing that its "Lean" is actually healthier than say eating a very lean piece of grass fed beef.

For those folks who don't fall into the poverty category, there are people who are just cheap, or are not willing to pay for healthy food. I hear people say all the time they cannot afford organic vegetables for instance or grass fed meat. I ask them how much fruit and veggies they actually eat. Lets say its $15-20 of their weekly budget for 2 people. I ask them if they are willing to spend an extra $5-10 on that food. Forget the organic argument, people somehow feel adverse to spend $100 on raw veggies, fruit and meat/fish, but would rather spend $100 on processed, premade food or eating out.

Its affordable to some people, people just choose not to spend money on it. Some people are lazy and dont' want to cook. So they justify that they cannot afford to eat so healthy. However those same people will spend $100/month on cable TV or their iPhone bills, but they wont' buy healthy food.

I also believe you have to be self aware of what your body type is and what you easily digest and cannot. Stop eating the things that irritate you or make you gain weight. Some people cannot eat a lot of starches such as wheat or rice, highly processed or not. They gain weight, it raises their blood sugar, they get bloated, they have acid problems or IBS. Stop taking a pill and start listening to your body. If you stopped eating and just lived off an IV drip for a few weeks, IBS or whatever stomach/digesting issues would stop plaguing you because there is nothing in your stomach/colon to irritate it. People just aren't always self aware to figure out what food types work for them and which ones dont.

Carbs are not bad, nor are starches, there are healthier ones than others such as quinoa, buckwheat, sweet potatoes, etc. Some agree with people, others dont'. Farm fed salmon is not necessarily healthier for you than meat. People need to better understand what they are eating, what the animal they are eating ate, and how their veggies/fruit were grown.

There are a lot of people who can eat a crapload of carbs, who eat more than the average person, but also work out regularly and are thin, fit people. I don't believe in a "diet". Its about moderation, eating what your body can process and feeds your metabolism versus slowing it down, and about burning more than you eat.

Submitted by ocrenter on July 4, 2010 - 12:08pm.

when it comes to fat, the issue is not complete elimination, but rather shift to good fat and reduce to moderation. red meat as it presently available come from cattle that does nothing but stand in a stall all of their short lives, that translate to increased fatty content of the meat.

as for carbs, refined carbs are essentially sugar. it is, like jp pointed out, highly addictive. I know people that can down 5 bowls of white rice in a single sitting, but once they transition to brown rice they just naturally have a single bowl and that's it. the same goes for pasta, bread, and tortillas.

the issue is too much food, regardless of the activities.

for example, brisk walking for 2 hours burn 200 calories. but if you get a single entree at a regular restaurant you are routinely looking at 1700 to 2000 calories, added to that drinks and appetizers and desert, you could be looking at 3000 calories. assuming that person would eat another 1000 calories for the other 2 meals of the day, that translate to 5000 calories. subtract 2000 calories for a typical male with average activities for a day, that's 3000 calories over on that day. 3000/200 = 15 hours of brisk walking to burn up the excess calories. how many people walk 15 hours on a day that they decide to go out to Chili's or TGIF or Claim Jumper?

Submitted by jpinpb on July 4, 2010 - 12:43pm.

I've basically had to replace all my flour meals w/brown rice. It is a great substitute. I never was big on white rice, but the breads, pizza, that was tough for me. I loved Bread and Cie. The smell alone was irresistible. Brown rice is better for you. Vitamin B.

Submitted by mike92104 on July 4, 2010 - 1:04pm.

I think the obesity issue is from food becoming much more readily and easily obtainable while or lifestyles are becoming much more sedentary. It's just that simple.

I blame my weight gain over the past couple years on two things. My new Costco card, and the new asian girlfriend (turning 30 probably didn't help). Between the two, I found myself 40 lbs overweight. I have started dieting and have been losing an average of a pound a week. I didn't eliminate anything out of my diet all together, but I have started to change the ratios of bad foods to good. Wheat pasta instead of regular, brown rice instead of white, and most importantly, eliminated an average of 500 calories a day from my diet. This wasn't too hard to do since I realized I tend to eat when I'm bored.

Submitted by NotCranky on July 4, 2010 - 1:11pm.

ocrenter wrote:

the issue is too much food, regardless of the activities.

for example, brisk walking for 2 hours burn 200 calories. but if you get a single entree at a regular restaurant you are routinely looking at 1700 to 2000 calories, added to that drinks and appetizers and desert, you could be looking at 3000 calories. assuming that person would eat another 1000 calories for the other 2 meals of the day, that translate to 5000 calories. subtract 2000 calories for a typical male with average activities for a day, that's 3000 calories over on that day. 3000/200 = 15 hours of brisk walking to burn up the excess calories. how many people walk 15 hours on a day that they decide to go out to Chili's or TGIF or Claim Jumper?

Simple solution, on a planned dinner out day to a restaurant where the food is heavy for breakfast have a glass of juice and a piece of high fiber toast, for lunch a hard boiled egg and apple. Drink plenty of water during the day to help deal with the lousy restaurant food. Order one of the healthier things on the menu or just eat half.(Any reasonable variations will do)
I don't really consider that dieting. It is just applying common sense and decent care in the face of a questionable dinner.Most importantly, the remedy is before the fact not after. No guilt or panic or other negatives associated with dieting.

Submitted by jeeman on July 5, 2010 - 5:04am.

I'm with OCRenter....your workouts will never catch up to your eating. Most people think, "i'll just go to the gym more" and never change their eating.

Ever tried to help someone with what they eat? It produces just as much conflict as politics and religion.

Submitted by weberlin on July 5, 2010 - 7:11am.

ocrenter wrote:
The obesity epidemic is the result of a perfect confluence of conditions in this country since the 60's:

--families gradually moved from single income to double income or single parent households, translating to less in home cooking and more take outs/eating out or reliance on easy to cook processed food.

--expansion of suburbia, which also translate to increased reliance on cars and increased commute time. this eliminate walking as integral part of daily life.

--the increased reliance on restaurant food/processed microwave ready food means increased amount of dollar in that area. this drives competition for this expending dollar. the expending food industry realized if they maximize taste (increase in grease and salt), maximize portion size, and improve efficiency (thus lower cost), they can maximize their profit.

...

Any conversation about the state of agriculture and food consumption practices in post-Vietnam U.S. needs to weigh the considerable influence of Earl Butz, the Secretary of Agriculture appointed by Nixon.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_Butz

Butz was successful in creating policies that created cheap food. I don't think he foresaw the rise and domination of multi-national agri-corp behemoths like Monsanto, and Tyson as an additional consequence of his policies.

Regardless of intent, Butz is the guy that set the ball rolling on large corporations pushing out small farmers to get ridiculous subsidies. These subsidies were initially priced to incentivize food production to lower the cost of food for families in the 60's. Unfortunately, these subsidies have only increased since their initial adoption.

Submitted by ocrenter on July 5, 2010 - 9:24am.

weberlin wrote:

Regardless of intent, Butz is the guy that set the ball rolling on large corporations pushing out small farmers to get ridiculous subsidies. These subsidies were initially priced to incentivize food production to lower the cost of food for families in the 60's. Unfortunately, these subsidies have only increased since their initial adoption.

so perhaps simply redirecting the subsidies toward production of healthier food?

Submitted by Aecetia on July 5, 2010 - 10:33am.

You do have to wonder about government subsidies. I heard there might be some kind of attempt to prevent small backyard producers from selling or giving away their food in a bill, but I could not find it to verify. Farmer's markets seems to be one of the better places to get fresh produce, honey, etc. This has been discussed before, but I would like to put aspartame on the contributing to obesity. Some doctors consider it a deadly neurotoxin.

Submitted by Operation on July 5, 2010 - 12:03pm.

It's all about meat.

I'm down 15lbs since end of March. I cut out meat & dairy & basically went Vegan for 30 days. I still have fish & eggs on occasion and am now pretty much a Vegetarian.

I just started hitting the free weights & cardio in the gym the last 2 weeks.

I feel & look lighter, leaner and have more energy. One thing I think many posters have ignored is the rise in meat consumption (fast or not) is directly tied to the rise in obesity:

http://www.jhsph.edu/publichealthnews/pr...

The rise in meat consumption, particularly pork & diary in various parts of Asia has more to do with rising incomes than the prevalence of Western fast food.

"Beef, it's what's for dinner" and lunch, and breakfast...

Meat & dairy consumption, is simply not sustainable for both our waists, health and environment. For eons, we have lived off fruits, vegetables and grains with the occasional grilled animal.

Submitted by briansd1 on July 5, 2010 - 12:49pm.

jeeman wrote:

Ever tried to help someone with what they eat? It produces just as much conflict as politics and religion.

Food is very emotional and cultural.

We have to look at it scientifically.

I tell friends and relatives that we'll know who is right when we turn 50 then 80.

At 50, he who looks best wins.

At 80, he who is healthiest and still going strong wins.

Operation wrote:

Meat & dairy consumption, is simply not sustainable for both our waists, health and environment. For eons, we have lived off fruits, vegetables and grains with the occasional grilled animal.

I agree. That's the best way to live a long healthy life.

Vegetarians who eat gluten and processed food are however not helping themselves.

The simple solution is to not eat any processed food of any kind (maybe occasionally at gatherings with friends and family).

Submitted by bubba99 on July 5, 2010 - 3:57pm.

Recently I returned from a few weeks in the far north of Thailand. I spent my time in small farming villages and I ate as normal, but "native" foods. Fresh foods, not frozen or in anyway enhanced. Imagine my surprise when I returned to the US, and my uniforms were now a size too big.

Could be many reasons, but I believe that the food we are eating in America is killing us. The salt, calories, antibiotics, genetically engineered food, and growth hormones are all contributing to us getting fat. The goal of the food producers is not to grow health items, but the cheapest, most profitable crap we will buy. Any side effect of hormones like increased appetite is just a plus to them.

Submitted by weberlin on July 5, 2010 - 4:30pm.

ocrenter wrote:
weberlin wrote:

Regardless of intent, Butz is the guy that set the ball rolling on large corporations pushing out small farmers to get ridiculous subsidies. These subsidies were initially priced to incentivize food production to lower the cost of food for families in the 60's. Unfortunately, these subsidies have only increased since their initial adoption.

so perhaps simply redirecting the subsidies toward production of healthier food?

Absolutely! Unfortunately, the Farm Lobby is very powerful, and they like the current distribution of farm subsidies just fine.

Submitted by CardiffBaseball on July 5, 2010 - 4:49pm.

Operation wrote:
It's all about meat.

I'm down 15lbs since end of March. I cut out meat & dairy & basically went Vegan for 30 days. I still have fish & eggs on occasion and am now pretty much a Vegetarian.

I just started hitting the free weights & cardio in the gym the last 2 weeks.

I feel & look lighter, leaner and have more energy. One thing I think many posters have ignored is the rise in meat consumption (fast or not) is directly tied to the rise in obesity:

http://www.jhsph.edu/publichealthnews/pr...

The rise in meat consumption, particularly pork & diary in various parts of Asia has more to do with rising incomes than the prevalence of Western fast food.

"Beef, it's what's for dinner" and lunch, and breakfast...

Meat & dairy consumption, is simply not sustainable for both our waists, health and environment. For eons, we have lived off fruits, vegetables and grains with the occasional grilled animal.

What if it's all been a big-fat lie?

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/07/magazi...

Again, if someone wants to eat Vegan more power to them, I admire their courage to have to eat like that day in and day out. But to suggest it would help or benefit everyone is crap. Good Calories/Bad Calories by Taubes is also an excellent source if you want to see the Govt./Food industry collaboration over the last 50 years.

I personally have way more energy and feel significantly lighter when I've avoided carbs for a few days. I also sleep better.

The difference between you and me is that I don't talk about my way being best for everyone.

Submitted by briansd1 on July 5, 2010 - 10:48pm.

CardiffBaseball wrote:

What if it's all been a big-fat lie?

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/07/magazi...

The Atkins diet does work. You will lose weight by eliminating carbs (sugar).

But saturated fat is harmful. You will not live a long life on the Atkins diet.

Fruits and vegetables give you antioxidants and nutrition for good health.

Some unprocessed meats and dairy with lots of veggies, fruits and some whole grain (such as plain oatmeal) is best.

Restricting calorie and being underweight has been proven to extend life substantially.

I'm willing to forgo "luxury" food for an extra 20 years of life.

Submitted by CardiffBaseball on July 5, 2010 - 11:34pm.

Brian I'd suggest pulling together $20 or heading to the library and getting Taubes' book. You'll find a well-researched, exhaustively footnoted book, that discusses many of the the claims about saturated fat.

Submitted by Operation on July 6, 2010 - 7:26am.

CardiffBaseball wrote:
The difference between you and me is that I don't talk about my way being best for everyone.

Cardiff, please re-read my post and tell me where I say a plant-based diet is best for everyone. Little defensive are we?

Submitted by NotCranky on July 6, 2010 - 7:50am.

Operation wrote:
CardiffBaseball wrote:
The difference between you and me is that I don't talk about my way being best for everyone.

Cardiff, please re-read my post and tell me where I say a plant-based diet is best for everyone. Little defensive are we?


Let's have a food fight!
The last couple of post go back to what a few have said. It's the "too much food" thing. Instead we want to debate who's theory gets more brownie points(yes thin people can eat brownies).

Just look around, you see healthy people eat a variety of ways. But the fat people and the know it alls have to be special and be the only ones have a clue about what's best. Is it unfair to ask with all this specialized knowlege, "if you are so smart why are you so fat?". And the only person on this blog who indicated a need to be satiated all the time is the dieter. Ordinary people do not have to be, or should not be satieted all the time, unless the want to be overweight. Being healthy is a cycle of being hungry and reasonably full of decent food. Nobody ever died of a brief episode of hunger.

Submitted by jpinpb on July 6, 2010 - 8:33am.

Aecetia wrote:
... but I would like to put aspartame on the contributing to obesity. Some doctors consider it a deadly neurotoxin.

Lucky for me I had an immediate bad reaction to aspartame so I avoid anything w/it. They like to put it in chewing gum. It's in a lot. Read labels. It is as bad as HFCS. I just read most HFCS contains high mercury levels. HFCS = Evil.

Submitted by jpinpb on July 6, 2010 - 8:37am.

I went to the fair yesterday and was blown away by what people were eating. Fried butter and chocolate covered bacon! An ambulance was on standby. Also the funnel cakes loaded w/whip cream and chocolate and caramel syrup. I just don't know how people weren't going into diabetic shock. Looking around, people were morbidly obese. No wonder.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.