huge topic:Americans keep getting fatter

User Forum Topic
Submitted by desmond on June 29, 2010 - 3:37pm

http://news.yahoo.com/s/hsn/20100629/hl_...

Easy access to fast, cheap food, to busy to cook, many reasons why, and it is getting worse.

Submitted by XBoxBoy on June 29, 2010 - 4:09pm.

Not all Americans are getting fatter. I've lost 38 lbs in the last year, so there!

SkinnyBoxBoy

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 29, 2010 - 4:46pm.

i am always the same; not for health reasons; I am too cheap to buy new suits. there is no way in hell I'm going to gain weight.

Submitted by Eugene on June 29, 2010 - 4:53pm.

All developed countries have been getting fatter at alarming rates for the past 40 years.

Submitted by sdduuuude on June 29, 2010 - 5:39pm.

Looks like we need some deflation.

Submitted by jpinpb on June 29, 2010 - 5:39pm.

I blame it on HFCS.

Submitted by briansd1 on June 29, 2010 - 7:24pm.

jpinpb wrote:
I blame it on HFCS.

I think that you're partly right. HFCS is cheap sugar that we put into everything.

Cheap sugar is like cheap gas. We use lots of it. We pollute our bodies and environment.

Should government regulate and raise the prices to save us from ourselves? Or should the people be free to consume cheap stuff?

We've decided to let the buyers beware. So, with that predicate, fat people are responsible for their own problems. The fact is that one can't gain weight unless one consumes more calories that one expends.

If we force fat people to pay proportionately more for their health care, maybe people would make adjustments to their eating habits.

Submitted by Aecetia on June 29, 2010 - 7:34pm.

HFCS would not be so cheap if cane sugar was not subsidized. http://www.fff.org/freedom/0498d.asp Free market economics would lower the price and then perhaps there would be less obesity or not. We are probably paying for the medical care of many of the morbidly obese because I doubt most of them are working, judging from the Walmart pictures.

Submitted by Eugene on June 29, 2010 - 8:36pm.

I don't think that HFCS is a big part of the problem. HFCS is uncommon outside the United States, and they are facing the same problem:

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-620-m/20... (Canada)
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Img/... (Scotland)
http://www.wunrn.com/news/2007/12_07/12_... (UK)

And, here in the U.S., it is an extremely old problem. The United States had a higher obesity rate in 1970 (before HFCS was introduced) than countries like Spain or France have today.

I try to consume as little HFCS or sugar as possible, and I don't think that one is necessarily better than the other.

The real cause, I think, is restaurants (including, but not limited to fast-food) and their drive to make bigger and tastier portions. The way our human bodies work, it's easy to gain weight by overeating, it's very hard to lose it. You can gain 1/3 to 1/2 lb. without thinking twice just by eating once at El Torito or Chipotle, unless you exercise conscious restraint and stop halfway through the meal. Once that fat is in your body, it's going to stay there, it takes a lot of strenuous exercise, something like 2 hours on a treadmill, to get it out. Go to El Torito once a week for three years without exercising - that's 60 lbs, enough to get you from normal BMI to obesity. Since most people go to restaurants much more often than they exercise for 2 hours continuously, it's no surprise that so many people are fat.

Submitted by CardiffBaseball on June 29, 2010 - 8:56pm.

The fat that you eat isn't any big deal if you leave out the starchy foods (pasta, bread, potatoes etc.)

Hard to do, yet I feel so much better personally when I cut out the carbs (veggies and fruits ok, but limit fruits if cutting).

Started grabbing stuff off of Livin' La Vida Lo-Carb at itunes just to make myself realize that feeling better means eating better. I sleep better, have more energy etc.

Submitted by Coronita on June 29, 2010 - 9:00pm.

Actually, obesity is a big problem in China now..
I guess with increased prosperity, people end up gorging more.

So, relating this back to the economy, if we go through a economic depression, do people gain or lose weight?

On one hand, being poor, probably means you have to scale back on food...

On the other hand, being poor, you end up eating the cheapest things (like $99 burgers or some crap like that).

So which way do American's weight go when we have an economic depression?

BTW: have you folks been to McDonald's lately? I have to say, I went to the one in Carmel Valley last week (kid wanted to go), and wow the menu has changed. Well, you still can get the fast food crap, but they actually have some pretty decent healthy food that's not bad tasting too.

Submitted by Eugene on June 29, 2010 - 9:23pm.

CardiffBaseball wrote:
The fat that you eat isn't any big deal if you leave out the starchy foods (pasta, bread, potatoes etc.)

Hard to do, yet I feel so much better personally when I cut out the carbs (veggies and fruits ok, but limit fruits if cutting).

Started grabbing stuff off of Livin' La Vida Lo-Carb at itunes just to make myself realize that feeling better means eating better. I sleep better, have more energy etc.

Quantity is more important than composition. Pretty much anything can be converted into fat, as long as there's an excess of calories.

One Chipotle burrito contains 1200 to 1400 calories. That's enough calories to sustain an average sedentary white-collar worker for 24 hours. But your body does not work like that: it will refill the reserves, using maybe 300 calories, and send the rest into long-term storage as fat, and 4-6 hours later you'll feel hungry again.

Go to a full-service Mexican restaurant, order the same burrito, some chips, and a margarita (300-500 cal), and you're pushing 2000 calories in one sitting.

Submitted by briansd1 on June 30, 2010 - 8:12am.

Eugene wrote:

Quantity is more important than composition. Pretty much anything can be converted into fat, as long as there's an excess of calories.

One Chipotle burrito contains 1200 to 1400 calories.

By quantity, you must mean calorie density.

It's important to choose high nutrition, high antioxidant, low calorie, low glycemic index, high fiber food.

For example, I have plain oatmeal with hot water for breakfast. If you eat the flavored, sugared oatmeal, then you're defeating the purpose.

I've learned to eat very plain, bland food. But I find it delicious because I can taste and appreciate the natural unadulterated ingredients.

Submitted by natty on June 30, 2010 - 8:47am.

Obesity is an imaginary word used on a sliding scale.
BMI is bunk. body weight/height ARE up for interpretation. Take for instance a 6' tall, 215lb athlete, true body fat percentage 4%, but by BMI calculations, 29.2 and overweight-nearing 'obese'.

Even within BMI, countries have different 'normalcy ranges'. The calculation is stated as a risk assessment tool, and when coupled with ANY other 'risks', can be an indicator for shorter life expectancy. A more general statement is difficult to find when it comes to health.

A more accurate body fat percentage measurement is not performed by your local physician. Hydrostatic body fat testing is a method.

For me, the places I frequent, activities I participate in, people I would classify as adversely overweight are not an overwhelming common sight.

The reality is, we are all in the process of dying, some faster than others by choice, some not by choice, some by random life events.

Are diet and nutrition widely understood, of course not. Are many restaurant options more concerned with profit than raw food quality, of course. Is large scale food mfg/processing 'made', and not 'natural', yes.

Is there a solvable problem here? No.

Submitted by desmond on June 30, 2010 - 8:57am.

briansd1 wrote:
Eugene wrote:

Quantity is more important than composition. Pretty much anything can be converted into fat, as long as there's an excess of calories.

One Chipotle burrito contains 1200 to 1400 calories.

By quantity, you must mean calorie density.

It's important to choose high nutrition, high antioxidant, low calorie, low glycemic index, high fiber food.

For example, I have plain oatmeal with hot water for breakfast. If you eat the flavored, sugared oatmeal, then you're defeating the purpose.

I've learned to eat very plain, bland food. But I find it delicious because I can taste and appreciate the natural unadulterated ingredients.

Sounds like my sex life.

Submitted by jpinpb on June 30, 2010 - 9:08am.

briansd1 wrote:
I've learned to eat very plain, bland food. But I find it delicious because I can taste and appreciate the natural unadulterated ingredients.

That's a good point. Salt is in everything and I think it deadens one's taste buds. Takes a while of eating "bland" food, but then you do taste the flavor of the actual ingredient and it's not bland at all.

Submitted by CDMA ENG on June 30, 2010 - 9:09am.

briansd1 wrote:
Eugene wrote:

Quantity is more important than composition. Pretty much anything can be converted into fat, as long as there's an excess of calories.

One Chipotle burrito contains 1200 to 1400 calories.

By quantity, you must mean calorie density.

It's important to choose high nutrition, high antioxidant, low calorie, low glycemic index, high fiber food.

For example, I have plain oatmeal with hot water for breakfast. If you eat the flavored, sugared oatmeal, then you're defeating the purpose.

I've learned to eat very plain, bland food. But I find it delicious because I can taste and appreciate the natural unadulterated ingredients.

This is one time that I completely agree with Brian. You have no idea what our bodies learn, at first, to tolerate, and later, crave. When I was a teenager I had my jaw broken. After 3 months of being wired shut I had put no greasy foods into my system. Sugars yes but because the only thing I could eat at lunch time was Mc Donald's shakes.

When I finally had my jaw unwired the first meal I had was baked ziti. One of my favorites. I could barely eat it. The oil and grease in it were barely tolerable!

I learned then how tough it was to eat this crap at first and then crave it.

After the grease hiatus I could taste things like vegatable and fruit with such clarity...

Infact, baked ziti sounds great right now... Sigh... and I wonder why I am 30lbs overwieght...

CE

Submitted by CardiffBaseball on June 30, 2010 - 10:00am.

There is such a thing on the weight lifting sites as looking good naked as a goal, however that is not the same as what a physician might consider overweight.

That is if you poll medical folks outside of folks with drastic stomach fat, someone with a slight beer belly is not going to get your Doctor too excited. Or perhaps the lady with cottage cheese or saddlebags could be considered the same. So while a some men might consider her fat, her Dr. is probably telling her she's fine. Have a walk everyday and don't sweat it. There is no true need for 6-pack abs unless you are an athlete, (triathlete), or want to "swing" with other hard bodies.

I still fall under obese because I've put my kid's activities ahead of mine when in reality a 45 minute walk a day would help a ton (especially when in a ketogenic state). Ironically I'd be able to do even more stuff with them.

Submitted by eavesdropper on June 30, 2010 - 1:34pm.

desmond wrote:
briansd1 wrote:

I've learned to eat very plain, bland food. But I find it delicious because I can taste and appreciate the natural unadulterated ingredients.

Sounds like my sex life.

desmond, that has to be the Piggs "Response of the Week". Priceless! However, I have to ask: Is it the statement above in its entirety? Or just the first sentence?

Submitted by eavesdropper on June 30, 2010 - 2:22pm.

walterwhite wrote:
i am always the same; not for health reasons; I am too cheap to buy new suits. there is no way in hell I'm going to gain weight.

PeopleofWalmart.com disproves your theory, Scaredy.

However, I'm not sure that I'm being entirely fair about this. When you're on a budget, it's hard to choose buying new clothes over all the other great stuff that Walmart sells. Even if you did grow out of those size 10s fifteen years and 150 lbs ago.

Submitted by desmond on June 30, 2010 - 2:31pm.

eavesdropper wrote:
desmond wrote:
briansd1 wrote:

I've learned to eat very plain, bland food. But I find it delicious because I can taste and appreciate the natural unadulterated ingredients.

Sounds like my sex life.

desmond, that has to be the Piggs "Response of the Week". Priceless! However, I have to ask: Is it the statement above in its entirety? Or just the first sentence?

First sentence only, this is a "PG" forum!

Submitted by eavesdropper on June 30, 2010 - 3:05pm.

briansd1 wrote:
...Should government regulate and raise the prices to save us from ourselves? Or should the people be free to consume cheap stuff?

We've decided to let the buyers beware. So, with that predicate, fat people are responsible for their own problems. The fact is that one can't gain weight unless one consumes more calories that one expends.

If we force fat people to pay proportionately more for their health care, maybe people would make adjustments to their eating habits.

Alas, brian, they will not. They will simply get themselves a lawyer who will get them a doctor who will testify that they are totally disabled and cannot work. Presto! Social Security disability judgement. Monthly cash payment. Free health care. Scooters and Med-Lift recliners with heat and massage.

Check out the SS disability diagnosis trends, and how they've changed over the past 20 years. As a nation, we decry the increase in obesity as an "epidemic", yet we are subsidizing that epidemic. Doctors and lawyers that earn their living by aiding Social Security disability applicants repeatedly emphasize the importance of obesity in the determination of benefits process. For instance, if you are obese and have low back pain, you are not only much more likely to be approved for benefits, but also less likely to have a time limit placed on those benefits (due to the widely-held belief that weight loss is usually not maintained) than another LBP applicant who is not obese.

Submitted by an on June 30, 2010 - 3:33pm.

XBoxBoy wrote:
Not all Americans are getting fatter. I've lost 38 lbs in the last year, so there!

SkinnyBoxBoy


Agree, not all Americans are getting fatter. I've also lost 15-20lbs (10-14%).

Submitted by eavesdropper on June 30, 2010 - 5:21pm.

flu wrote:
Actually, obesity is a big problem in China now..
I guess with increased prosperity, people end up gorging more.

So, relating this back to the economy, if we go through a economic depression, do people gain or lose weight?

On one hand, being poor, probably means you have to scale back on food...

On the other hand, being poor, you end up eating the cheapest things (like $99 burgers or some crap like that).

So which way do American's weight go when we have an economic depression?

BTW: have you folks been to McDonald's lately? I have to say, I went to the one in Carmel Valley last week (kid wanted to go), and wow the menu has changed. Well, you still can get the fast food crap, but they actually have some pretty decent healthy food that's not bad tasting too.

flu, while I think you're on the money (no pun intended) with your improved economic conditions theory, I'd place some of the blame on globalization. McDonald's, Kentucky Fried Chix, Pizza Hut, and others have all made major inroads into the "fast food" culture that has hit China in the last 20 years. However, China has the problem of childhood obesity under control: they're ordering 5-minute waltzing sessions in their schools. All of the teachers are not in agreement: some believe that calisthenics would be a much better solution, while others fear undesirable fallout from the sessions. Teacher Ma Yanling opined, "Letting students waltz will create hotbeds of adolescent love."

As for what Americans in reduced circumstances will eat, I don't agree that most Americans eat fast food and junk food because it's cheap. I don't think it IS cheap. I think many just don't want to cook, or know how to prepare food.

Submitted by jimmyle on July 1, 2010 - 10:52am.

I was in Vietnam two years ago and my cousins rewarded their kids (for doing good in school) with KFC foods which suppose to high-end in Vietnam. The kids were collecting KFC coupons in newspapers and got very excited. The reason they don't go to KFCs too often is because it is expensive, imagine when it becomes affordable like in the US.

Submitted by Coronita on July 1, 2010 - 10:59am.

jimmyle wrote:
I was in Vietnam two years ago and my cousins rewarded their kids (for doing good in school) with KFC foods which suppose to high-end in Vietnam. The kids were collecting KFC coupons in newspapers and got very excited. The reason they don't go to KFCs too often is because it is expensive, imagine when it becomes affordable like in the US.

In asia, those western fast food restaurants in China are considered high end actually, because the price people pay there is comparable to the same amount you spend in the U.S....They usually aren't adjusted for the local wages....So folks in China spend roughly $3-4 USD for a burger and fries too.

Submitted by afx114 on July 1, 2010 - 11:37am.

You also will find many factories in Asia with a mandatory exercise period before the start of the work day. You'll see them lined up with a drill instructor leading the exercise. I find that interesting and imagine it would increase worker awareness and productivity throughout the day, not to mention overall health.

Submitted by briansd1 on July 1, 2010 - 1:10pm.

afx114 wrote:
You also will find many factories in Asia with a mandatory exercise period before the start of the work day.

In Singapore, military service is compulsory. Men of fighting age are required to undergo annual check up and are rewarded with a small amount of money for staying fit. Those who don't stay within fitness range are required to do bootcamp.

On an annual basis, NSmen go through either a high key training or a low key training until they reach the age of 40 or 50 depending on their rank. "High-key" or intensive training involves operations and In-Camp Training (ICT), which last for seven days or longer. "Low-key" training refers to a training duration of six days or less.
http://wapedia.mobi/en/National_Service_...

They also have a national assessment. Despite the health programs, I still think the people over there are too fat and round. A sign of a rich Asian society. The food there is very greasy.

http://www.np.edu.sg/sdar/napfa/Pages/de...

Submitted by eavesdropper on July 1, 2010 - 3:07pm.

flu wrote:
jimmyle wrote:
I was in Vietnam two years ago and my cousins rewarded their kids (for doing good in school) with KFC foods which suppose to high-end in Vietnam. The kids were collecting KFC coupons in newspapers and got very excited. The reason they don't go to KFCs too often is because it is expensive, imagine when it becomes affordable like in the US.

In asia, those western fast food restaurants in China are considered high end actually, because the price people pay there is comparable to the same amount you spend in the U.S....They usually aren't adjusted for the local wages....So folks in China spend roughly $3-4 USD for a burger and fries too.

Yes, I read that it is the upper economic classes in China who are experiencing the obesity issues, because they are the only ones who can afford the fast food. As the economic upswing in China spreads across a wider range of its citizens, consumption of fast food increases, as does the problem with obesity.

I don't know about now, but in the early days of fast food in China (late 80s & early 90s), well-to-do families would have their wedding receptions in McDonalds and KFC "dining rooms". It was considered a sign of wealth and prestige.

Submitted by dbapig on July 1, 2010 - 3:25pm.

this certainly is a weighty topic we should think about

Submitted by desmond on July 1, 2010 - 5:08pm.

dbapig wrote:
this certainly is a weighty topic we should think about

I will have a cold one thinking about it, but a new Red Strip "Light" to not add the lbs.

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