How to Let Piano Teacher Go

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Submitted by TeCKis300 on February 6, 2017 - 3:23pm

We're currently looking to let a piano teacher of 2.5 yrs go, for a new teacher. She currently teaches my 7 yr old daughter.

We're not unsatisfied with her necessarily, just that we have found a new teacher that is a full time teacher, that is more connected, and has great reviews to find ways to motivate students.

Anyone have recommendations or experience on how to let the current teacher go gently?

Submitted by flu on February 6, 2017 - 3:52pm.

I don't think you need to worry about it. Most teachers are pretty professional about it. As long as you are professional and courteous at what you say, you're fine. You could just say, my kid would like to try other things and we are taking a break... It's the easiest thing to say, and everyone knows what that really means when someone says that.

Besides, 2.5 years is not really that long enough such that a teacher would be butt hurt, especially when a student is only age 7. Many of the young kids aren't really going to be interested moving forward anyway, so teachers already expect a turnover at this young of an age.

Also, the relationship between the student and teacher, in many cases is two way. My kid's violin teacher has emphasized many times that he will let students go at age 12 if they aren't performing at a certain level by then, and he doesn't take any new students older than 12.

So again, it's unlikely your teacher would be offended or upset about it, because even teachers know that not every student and teacher match up is always optimal. And teachers are also looking for students that match well too for the long term.

Submitted by Hobie on February 7, 2017 - 6:09am.

Upon finishing lesson, hand her final check, let her know circumstances has changed and have to stop with the lessons. Thank her and done.

Be sure to not discuss this within earshot of daughter. If you want, a small parting thank you gift may be nice.

Submitted by TeCKis300 on February 7, 2017 - 10:41am.

All great advice thanks.

My wife is thinking about giving her notice in that we'll be giving her this months check, and letting her know this will be the last month with her. Letting her know that we are just looking for a different perspective.

Though I'm thinking this may make for an awkward next couple lessons?

Submitted by flu on February 7, 2017 - 10:55am.

TeCKis300 wrote:
All great advice thanks.

My wife is thinking about giving her notice in that we'll be giving her this months check, and letting her know this will be the last month with her. Letting her know that we are just looking for a different perspective.

Though I'm thinking this may make for an awkward next couple lessons?

When an employer gives you a pink slip and asks you to work until the end of the month to finish up, chances are, your mind really isn't going to be there, because that's just human nature.

Imho, a month's notice seems like a long time.. Two lessons prior is probably more reasonable. If there is any emotional attachment to students, the teacher would have that for students that's been with them for many many years. Many parents are just getting their kids to "try out" different things, so the turnover is expected. Chances are, she'll find another student to occupy your kid's time slot, if she's really popular anyway.

My kid's violin teacher has a waiting list, unless you want lessons at a really odd time.

Submitted by Balboa_Again on February 7, 2017 - 10:56am.

You could cancel the next couple of lessons and pay her for them anyway, like a severance. In these situations, a question I tend to ask is, "Does this money mean more to this person in their life than it means to me in my life?" The answer is a factor in coming to a decision I feel good about.

Submitted by cvmom on February 7, 2017 - 11:13am.

Balboa_Again wrote:
You could cancel the next couple of lessons and pay her for them anyway, like a severance. In these situations, a question I tend to ask is, "Does this money mean more to this person in their life than it means to me in my life?" The answer is a factor in coming to a decision I feel good about.

This is what I have done in the past. Worked well.

Submitted by svelte on February 7, 2017 - 5:24pm.

The answer is easy if you take it logically.
I'd like to help you in your struggle to be free.
There must be fifty ways to leave your teacher.

Slip out the back, Jack. Make a new plan, Stan. Don't be coy, Roy, just listen to me.

Hop on the bus, Gus. You don't need to discuss much - just drop off the key, Lee, and get yourself free.

Submitted by njtosd on February 7, 2017 - 11:45pm.

We avoid all of this and use the teachers at the Boys and Girls club. Teachers are surprisingly well trained - daughter's piano teacher went to the Peabody Conservatory at Johns Hopkins and has a masters in music composition. Many of them are part time instructors at the middle school and high school level (CCA and Torrey Pines) - which makes it nice for the kids. Overall, the teacher is important, but the kids have to be self motivated. Mine bugged me for lessons for quite a while before I gave in.

Submitted by TeCKis300 on February 8, 2017 - 9:33am.

The deed is done.

We choose to let her know when we paid for the month, that this will be our last month. And that we'll do 2 more lessons, and she can have the last week as good faith.

We told her that we really appreciated her time and effort. That we were mixing it up and looking for a different perspective to keep our daughter growing. She seemed to take it very well.

Our relationship is good enough that I trust that this teacher will come back the next two weeks and keep things fun and have closure. We'll have our daughter maker her some token of appreciation on the last lesson.

Really looking forward to the next teacher. She's just simply a cut above with more resourcefulness and poise to motivate my daughter at another level. I may even take up lessons myself.

Submitted by flyer on February 8, 2017 - 6:37pm.

When our kids were growing up, we seemed to have teachers and tutors for everything imaginable, from music to sports, and everything in-between, and rarely was the transition from one teacher to the next a problem. My wife and I were raised in the same way, and were happy we had some experience with these situations when it came to our own children.

These endeavors do seem to create erudite individuals, even though, in the final analysis, they ultimately become hobbies for most.

Submitted by harvey on February 8, 2017 - 6:45pm.

flyer wrote:
When our kids were growing up, we seemed to have teachers and tutors for everything imaginable, from music to sports, and everything in-between, and rarely was the transition from one teacher to the next a problem. My wife and I were raised in the same way, and were happy we had some experience with these situations when it came to our own children.

These endeavors do seem to create erudite individuals, even though, in the final analysis, they ultimately become hobbies for most.

Pilot question: What's the protocol for farting in the cockpit?

Submitted by flyer on February 9, 2017 - 1:36am.

Wow. That's a tough and exceptionally thoughtful question, and so appropriate for this thread. You've got me stumped, but, if I ever find the answer, I'll be extraordinarily happy to share it with everyone.

Submitted by harvey on February 9, 2017 - 8:40am.

flyer wrote:
Wow. That's a tough and exceptionally thoughtful question, and so appropriate for this thread. You've got me stumped, but, if I ever find the answer, I'll be extraordinarily happy to share it with everyone.

Well you never attempted to answer the OP's question so I figured the thread had drifted.

Thousands of hours in the cockpit, and you've never farted? Nor did you ever contemplate the subject after spending all that time in an enclosed space with another person?

I always figured there must be some sort of protocol like, "hey, maybe you should wear your oxygen mask now..."

Submitted by TeCKis300 on February 9, 2017 - 9:11am.

This one's easy.

They just get up and do a round of cropdusting on the passengers. Maybe even on the stewardesses. It's a favorite past time of the flight crew.

Submitted by harvey on February 9, 2017 - 10:19am.

TeCKis300 wrote:
This one's easy.

They just get up and do a round of cropdusting on the passengers. Maybe even on the stewardesses. It's a favorite past time of the flight crew.

Makes sense to me.

Although I thought we now called them flight attendants.

Who knows, maybe in the age of Trump we'll have stewardesses again?

Submitted by flyer on February 9, 2017 - 5:01pm.

My first post did address the OP, but these great responses to it are so much more fun, so I guess I'll have to admit, since we've done so well in real estate and with other investments, we haven't had to worry about jobs for years, so I've only been flying about once a month for a very long time. Probably the reason I'm out of the loop when it comes to important issues like this.

Submitted by harvey on February 9, 2017 - 5:16pm.

Even at one day per month you would still need to know the protocols, which I imagine have been well-established since the early days of aviation.

I'm sure farting has been around since before the Wright brothers, but it's good to know that aviation technology is always improving. I'd be concerned if my plane's captain wasn't up on the latest flight safety research:

http://www.news.com.au/travel/farting-on...

Tell you co-pilot that there's no need to thank me.

Submitted by flyer on February 9, 2017 - 5:54pm.

You're amazing--thanks! I fly the 767/777, and have heard a rumor (can't yet substantiate) that due to a heightened level of public concern, fart-o-meters will be added to the cockpit as soon as humanly possible.
It is because of discussions like these, that we may actually see this breakthrough in our lifetime!

Submitted by harvey on February 9, 2017 - 8:30pm.

No need for machines, the human nose is a very effective fart-o-meter.

Sitting right next to someone for 10+ hours on hundreds of flights, there's going to be farts.

I would think anyone with extensive experience would have an an anecdote or two to offer.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on February 9, 2017 - 9:13pm.

Good families don't fart.

Get this for your kids, along with the piano lessons.
https://www.amazon.com/Good-Families-Don...

Submitted by flyer on February 9, 2017 - 9:56pm.

I have many airline/travel anecdotes, many real estate anecdotes, many film anecdotes, many investment anecdotes, many family anecdotes, many college anecdotes etc., etc., that I discuss with friends and family all the time, as I'm sure everyone does wrt their interests, but that's not what this thread is about, and, since my original response was on topic to the OP, per this topic, I'd find it much more interesting to read the opinions of others wrt our children and their musical development, Strad, Steinway or other, vs. sharing anecdotes about farting in an airliner.

In fact, I can't even believe this thread has devolved to this level. Hopefully, it will get back on topic soon.

Submitted by harvey on February 9, 2017 - 10:08pm.

flyer wrote:
I have many airline/travel anecdotes, many real estate anecdotes, many film anecdotes, many investment anecdotes, many family anecdotes, many college anecdotes etc., etc., that I discuss with friends and family all the time, as I'm sure everyone does wrt their interests, but that's not what this thread is about, and, since my original response was on topic to the OP, per this topic, I'd find it much more interesting to read the opinions of others wrt our children and their musical development, Strad, Steinway or other, vs. sharing anecdotes about farting in an airliner.

In fact, I can't even believe this thread has devolved to this level. Hopefully, it will get back on topic soon.

Strad, Steinway...love it!

No Casios here!

Nobody wants to hear about someone else's kid playing a musical instrument. Goddamn, that's the archetype of boring.

Submitted by flyer on February 9, 2017 - 11:37pm.

Since you have asked about our involvement in the film business before, I can give you one last ot comment about how we've been able to invest in films like Avatar, etc., which may be a little more exciting than the previous discussion.

My wife (who is from a Hollywood insider family) went to college with and was engaged to a very influential person involved in making several mega-movies. Since they parted on equitable terms, we've kept in touch, and have been offered investment opportunities with multiple players in the film business on an ongoing basis, and, so far, so good.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on February 10, 2017 - 11:11am.

flyer wrote:
Since you have asked about our involvement in the film business before, I can give you one last ot comment about how we've been able to invest in films like Avatar, etc., which may be a little more exciting than the previous discussion.

My wife (who is from a Hollywood insider family) went to college with and was engaged to a very influential person involved in making several mega-movies. Since they parted on equitable terms, we've kept in touch, and have been offered investment opportunities with multiple players in the film business on an ongoing basis, and, so far, so good.

That's nice.. Hollywood is pretty much recession proof.

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