Home internet?

User Forum Topic
Submitted by treehugger on January 2, 2020 - 4:40pm

For those that have cut the cord with cable what are you doing for home internet? We don't have "cable" but are still paying cox for the internet. are there any other choices? My husband works from home, so he needs good service.

Submitted by carlsbadworker on January 2, 2020 - 4:52pm.

It depends on where you live. But generally, there isn't many choices. For most American, they only have one choice of the cable provider (Cox here) for cable Internet and one choice of teleco provider (AT&T U-verse or Verizon FIOS). FIOS is the best if you can get it, but they have stopped expanding. Google fiber stopped too. Some municipals want to build their own infrastructure but the telco/cable guys are pulling all kinds of tricks to stop them.

Some people are now putting their hopes on Elon Musk's starlink, with another 60 satellites to be launched on Monday's window. But I wouldn't count on it. We need a government that will break up monopoly like in the days of Ma Bell, sadly currently neither republican or democrats are interested in breaking up those monopolies and American pay way too much for average quality Internet.

Submitted by flu on January 2, 2020 - 5:35pm.

TMobile started offering 5G isp service for $50/month
https://www.t-mobile.com/isp/index

Submitted by spdrun on January 2, 2020 - 5:51pm.

Verizon FiOS and Spectrum can both provide Internet only for under $50 per month ... and fiber/coax is still better than airy-fairy wireless junque. The trial rates eventually expire, but you can churn the account between different household members or roommates, or switch providers once every 1-2 years if you have two available.

Submitted by svelte on January 3, 2020 - 3:49pm.

We got rid of cable TV five years back, and really don't miss it at all. Roku you're the greatest!

As you point out, we still need internet service so my wife upgraded us to Cox Premiere 150 mbps. In retrospect this was a very wise move because we have all sorts of data going over the internet now and I'm sure we'd be feeling it had she not upgraded our service.

As much as I hated Cox Cable, I am very happy with Cox Internet. The service to our house has been rock solid and that's important to us since we rely on it for so much now.

I'm almost afraid to find out what all would be affected if we lost internet service!

One note: you should check your internet speed and ensure you're receiving what you're paying for. Shortly after my wife upgraded us, my son and I didn't feel we were getting 150 mbps so we checked and sure enough we were only getting about 40 mbps. I isolated the internet connection (removed routers, etc) to prove that, and called Cox. After a couple of calls and technicians, they were able to determine they had an incorrect setting on their end. Once they flipped it to the correct position, we were getting the speed we signed up for.

Cheers

Submitted by spdrun on January 3, 2020 - 7:49pm.

You can also get Cocks Essential for $40/mo.

Submitted by flu on January 3, 2020 - 8:39pm.

Generally speaking, your house only gives you one cable option for ISP or one landline option for ISP.

For ISP through cable, your choices are really only Spectrum or Cox, not both. Only one provider services your area.

For ISP through landline, it's ATT because ATT owns most of the landlines in San Diego. Verizon does not service San Diego.

https://www.cabletv.com/ca/san-diego

There isn't much price competition so your only choice to save money is to switch back and forth between the promotional offers and switch when the promotion ends. Both cable and landline CO's know this, that's why they only started to offer the discounted internet service if you bundle with TV service. And if you don't bundle, sometimes they will data cap you each month to discourage you from using another streaming media/tv service (that was the point of net neutrality where an ISP couldn't force you buy content from them by making the cost to obtain content more expensive elsewhere).

Anyway, that's why I mentioned Tmobile's 5G service as a 3rd option because it's really the first time in a long time we have a viable alternative that is priced competively. TMobile 5G isn't really the 5G we are looking for, but it's a step in the right direction. And the service should get even better once it completely the acquisition of Sprint. Unless you are a power user, TMobile might be a viable option for you. And if you already are a TMobile customer, you might be able to convince them to give you a bundled price.

There's actually a 4th option but it's neither cost effective nor is bandwidth great. It's ISP via ViaSat, but the sattelite link is only good if you live in some rural area, trailer park, or boat, which neither cable, phone, or Tmobile 5G provides service... Or if you insist on having internet access anywhere because you are preparing for the end of the world, as some piggs appear to be.

https://www.viasatspecials.com/lp/intern...

I just switched from ATT uverse to Spectrum and negotiated a lowered promotional rate. When it expires, I'll revisit this again.

Submitted by spdrun on January 3, 2020 - 10:02pm.

Doesn't conventional satellite have bad latency issues?

Submitted by Myriad on January 4, 2020 - 3:29pm.

Yes, the latency is high (550ms Roundtrip), so it's bad for things that require real-time interaction (games, video chat). I've done real-time video chat over satcom - it's doable, just have to allow a slight delay for the response (whatsapp over a 1Mbps x 512k).
Probably even worse for things like webex which have their own delay in addition to the network latency.

But for things like video streaming, minor web browsing, it doesn't really make much of a difference.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on January 4, 2020 - 7:26pm.

I’m going to give t-mobile a try when available in my area.
I hate cox because they have 1TB data cap. Spectrum does not. ATT Uverse is slow.

Submitted by svelte on January 5, 2020 - 7:34pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:
I’m going to give t-mobile a try when available in my area.
I hate cox because they have 1TB data cap.

That's about 10 4K movies or a couple hundred high def movies.

We've never hit that limit...better things to do with our time.

If you're that much of a megauser, you can buy 500GB more from Cox for $30 more or unlimited for $50 more.

Submitted by ltsdd on January 5, 2020 - 9:13pm.

Cox gigablast has cap of 2TB.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on January 6, 2020 - 10:10am.

Security cameras that upload to the cloud use a lot of data.

Submitted by spdrun on January 6, 2020 - 12:47pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:
Security cameras that upload to the cloud use a lot of data.

Suckurity cameras that upload to the cloud destroy privacy. If you use them in your home, you're a fucking fool. If you aim them towards public property or a neighbor's property, you're a scoundrel that enables Amazon's or Google's surveillance networks.

Submitted by svelte on January 7, 2020 - 9:35am.

spdrun wrote:
FlyerInHi wrote:
Security cameras that upload to the cloud use a lot of data.

Suckurity cameras that upload to the cloud destroy privacy. If you use them in your home, you're a fucking fool. If you aim them towards public property or a neighbor's property, you're a scoundrel that enables Amazon's or Google's surveillance networks.

That's your opinion.

Back to FIH's point, it is valid - cloud-based security storage does eat up bandwidth. I'm looking to upgrade my surveillance system, so I'm glad he mentioned that aspect.

Right now, I store all my footage locally...which has both pros and cons.

Submitted by carlsbadworker on January 7, 2020 - 2:47pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:
I’m going to give t-mobile a try when available in my area.
I hate cox because they have 1TB data cap. Spectrum does not. ATT Uverse is slow.

T-mobile and satellite will have way smaller cap compared to Cox.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on January 7, 2020 - 7:25pm.

I like cloud based systems because I don’t have to maintain the infrastructure. It depends on the application, but the subscription is worth it, IMO.

I get the privacy concerns, but there is just too much crime, drugs and low-life behavior.

All my finished rentals have door cameras recording in a loop for X number of days. My tenants like the peace of mind. It depends how long the rental is, but the shorter the rental, the greater the need for surveillance.

Submitted by svelte on January 7, 2020 - 7:43pm.

I've been thinking through my surveillance system upgrade today.

Think I'll go with some cameras that use cloud based storage, and some that use local storage.

In that way, I can monitor strategic cameras while I'm away (the cloud cameras), but keep my bandwidth usage down and have weeks and weeks of history (local storage cameras) without paying the cloud host huge monthly fees to store it.

A side advantage: If a thief finds one system or the other, they'll disable it and assume they've disabled all cameras. While that won't be the case.

Layers of security. Like an onion.

Submitted by spdrun on January 7, 2020 - 8:01pm.

FiH: you've already proven yourself a coward as far as crime, what's new?

Submitted by FlyerInHi on January 7, 2020 - 8:46pm.

svelte wrote:
I've been thinking through my surveillance system upgrade today.

Think I'll go with some cameras that use cloud based storage, and some that use local storage.

In that way, I can monitor strategic cameras while I'm away (the cloud cameras), but keep my bandwidth usage down and have weeks and weeks of history (local storage cameras) without paying the cloud host huge monthly fees to store it.

A side advantage: If a thief finds one system or the other, they'll disable it and assume they've disabled all cameras. While that won't be the case.

Layers of security. Like an onion.

Smart!

Cloud systems have feature such as facial recognition and alerts that are lacking in CPE solutions. Plus cloud solutions automatically add new features periodically.

Submitted by ltsdd on January 7, 2020 - 10:11pm.

svelte wrote:
I've been thinking through my surveillance system upgrade today.

Think I'll go with some cameras that use cloud based storage, and some that use local storage.

In that way, I can monitor strategic cameras while I'm away (the cloud cameras), but keep my bandwidth usage down and have weeks and weeks of history (local storage cameras) without paying the cloud host huge monthly fees to store it.

A side advantage: If a thief finds one system or the other, they'll disable it and assume they've disabled all cameras. While that won't be the case.

Layers of security. Like an onion.

You could monitor your security cameras remotely with the free ip camera viewer app. Upgrade to the pro version for $4 and you'll be able to record videos remotely (create your own cloud).

Submitted by svelte on January 10, 2020 - 7:44am.

ltsdd wrote:

You could monitor your security cameras remotely with the free ip camera viewer app. Upgrade to the pro version for $4 and you'll be able to record videos remotely (create your own cloud).

Great idea, but I'm not sure I want to create a path to my cameras from outside.

There are so many ways for vulnerabilities to be exposed that I'd prefer to leave that worry to the established companies, though one could argue they aren't doing so hot at it, witness Ring:

https://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/dekalb-...

https://www.wmcactionnews5.com/2019/12/1...

I've been reading up on cameras a lot. Looks like I'm not the only one to think a wired/local setup supplemented by wireless/cloud cameras in hard-to-reach places is a good combination.

Submitted by rent4now on January 10, 2020 - 9:24am.

We recently switched to Tmobile's Home Internet. We have been pleasantly surprised by the speeds. We average well over 50Mb/s and up to 90Mb/s.Its $50/month compared to $80 we were paying for Cox.
May not work for gamers or others needing faster speeds but for the average household, it works great.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on January 10, 2020 - 1:42pm.

Svelte, I am securing a building using local and clouds solutions.
I am waiting for the cloud solutions to add more robust features — it’s only a matter of time.

For example, you can share your Google Nest cam with neighbors when you go away. That feature is limited however. You could also create a separate account to share a camera (say the entrance to an apartment building) with residents. They can view the camera, save and forward clips. Essentially, you’re able to crowd source security.

spdrun, NYC buildings that don’t have doormen should implement crowd sourcing security solutions, especially in bad neighborhoods with drug and crime problems.

Submitted by flu on January 10, 2020 - 1:52pm.

rent4now wrote:
We recently switched to Tmobile's Home Internet. We have been pleasantly surprised by the speeds. We average well over 50Mb/s and up to 90Mb/s.Its $50/month compared to $80 we were paying for Cox.
May not work for gamers or others needing faster speeds but for the average household, it works great.

That's good to know !

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