Feng Shui, is it important for you when buying a house?

User Forum Topic
Submitted by jimmyle on October 15, 2007 - 11:45pm

I wouldn't buy a house that is facing a T-Junction, Y-Junction or dead end road. Also, I would avoid buying a house with the sink and the stove directly facing each other, this can lead to arguments and conflict within the family.

Just my opinion.

Submitted by pertinazzio on October 16, 2007 - 4:44am.

As for myself I am only truly comfortable in homes where classical portions have been observed. The symmetry of a Roman villa is conducive to a sense of inner harmony through subordination of randomness. You enter through the atrium and proceed into the peristyle, a columned courtyard decorated with statuary and fountains and small trees bearing fragrant fruit. You don't need to worry about privacy fences because the exterior walls of the structure extend to the property lines and the backyard is, in effect, inside the house. Windows never face out into the world but only inward into the peristyle or impluvium. The over all feeling is one of complete mastery over the menacing possibilities presented by exterior chaos.

Beatus ille qui procul negotiis ... paterna rura bobus exercet suis, solutus omni fenore..... Horace

Submitted by pertinazzio on October 16, 2007 - 5:09am.

Vaastu or Vaastu shashtra is the ancient vedic system that corresponds to Feng Shui. Being a Hindu and not a Taoist (though I respect all paths), I prefer the specific methodologies of Vaastu. Through careful harmonization of physical and metaphysical forces Vaastu optimizes the flow of prana within the living structure and thus provides for the propitiation of hostile forces and almost guarantees that an auspicious and successful life is granted to all the inhabitants . After doing some research on the net, I have learned that an ideal vastu structure is remarkably similar to the above mentioned roman villa. My conclusion is that the romans were able to somehow intuit the principals of Vaastu without actually elaborating a formal set of teachings.

Beatus ille qui procul negotiis ... paterna rura bobus exercet suis, solutus omni fenore..... Horace

Submitted by raptorduck on October 16, 2007 - 7:13am.

I never realized why I like certain styles of homes and why I just love inner courtyards. Thank you.

Submitted by patientlywaiting on October 16, 2007 - 9:28am.

I heard that the stairwell should never point directly out the front door (wealth will flow out) and a mirror should never face the bed (it's like inviting strangers into your relationship). Also, if you want to attract love, put a pair of Mandarin ducks in the love corner of your bedroom (the love corner is different for each person and is based on the stars under which you were born). Exposed beams are not good because they create bad chi/energy (or poisoned arrows) in your home. Feng Shui is making a big splash in American architectural circles. Donald Trump and Larry Elison are big adherents.

Interestingly, the Chinese Mandarin house is also built around a central courtyard. Spain and Mexico have beautiful courtyard houses. They would be ideal for the dry climate of Southern California. The lawn is an import from the prairie (and England) and doesn't belong here.

Submitted by davelj on October 16, 2007 - 10:09am.

Feng Shui is very important to my evaluation of any dwelling. In addition, I look for easy access to the house for Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy. Moreover, a back yard with lots of bushes is necessary for ease of hiding eggs and other magical treats brought by the Easter Bunny.

Submitted by zzz on October 16, 2007 - 10:41am.

Yes to the stairwell - it should never face the front door. You should also not have an unobstructed view of the back door from the front door - again all good things will flow right through the home, out of the home. If you have a home office, or in your workplace, you should have your desk placed so that you are seated facing people walking in - you never want to turn your back on business.

Also, if you are a true believer in Feng Shui, you won't have a pool in the backyard and you won't be situated on a cliff. Water flowing in the back means missed opportunities. Not to mention bad luck. On a cliff - too much sun, lack of harmony, not to mention the likelihood your house might end up collapsing.

4 is also an unlucky number in many instances - not all - because of its close intonation to the word death. You'll notice a lot of buildings in Asia skip the 4th floor much like we skip the 13th. Therefore you may want to look at your address and decide if the numbers are lucky or unlucky. 24 is particularly unlucky - meaning you will starve to death. 44 is also unlucky, but 48 is very good as is most numbers with an 8 in it. 8 rhymes with prosperity.

Submitted by zzz on October 16, 2007 - 10:43am.

Split level homes

Also split levels homes are a definite NO! If you think about it logically, its a horrible flow for a home - practically with or without feng shui. It creates to much dissent, fracture, and lack of harmony in a home.

Submitted by Diego Mamani on October 16, 2007 - 10:51am.

"A mirror should never face the bed (it's like inviting strangers into your relationship)."

Can you explain, logically, the process by which such a mirror would invite strangers to your relationship?

Isn't that kind of gullibility that makes people easy victims of market manias and bubbles?

 

Submitted by 5yearwaiter on October 16, 2007 - 11:02am.

Phew :-),,, as long as you have conflicts going with your spouse you are in good deal of life or not at any risk - conflicts make you both clear in long run unlike you calm and spouse calm and suddenly one fine day divorced each other.

Well come to the Feng Shui or anyother sentiments such as (as I heard "vaastu" from many Indian IT folks following) all these trends shows similar patterns that our old era need to follow. The reason we didn't have electricity, nor airconditioning those such olden days. Today we route those all at our way and there is no need to really inclind all these trash in my opinion.

5yearswaiter

Submitted by patientlywaiting on October 16, 2007 - 11:25am.

A mirror should never face the bed (it's like inviting strangers into your relationship).

It has to do with the spirit leaving the body at night.  There are different spirits moving around at night and the reflections will shock and multiply them.  One of them may end up in bed with your wife!!

Isn't that kind of gullibility that makes people easy victims of market manias and bubbles?

Something like believing in Jesus Christ and that praying in church will save you from cancer? 

 

BTW, I don't truly believe in any of this.   But there's nothing wrong with creating a harmonious pleasing living environment.   Clutter is also very bad and is the worse source of bad chi/energy.   It's best to have an organized, clean and free flowing house.   I have seen some Asians who believe in Feng Shui, yet keep very cluttered houses.  With the clutter, they obviated all the good architectural Feng Shui. 

 

Submitted by Diego Mamani on October 16, 2007 - 12:15pm.

Something like believing in Jesus Christ and that praying in church will save you from cancer?

My point exactly. Or believing in the easter bunny, or the evil monkey in the closet. If you believe in one supernatural concept, what's to stop you from believing in another? (Be it Jebus, the tooth fairy, etc.)

And if you are gullible and believe in flying spirits, the horoscope, or santa claus, what's to stop a mortgage broker from taking advantage of your gullibility?

(With apologies to the Simpsons.)

Submitted by patientlywaiting on October 16, 2007 - 12:43pm.

Diego, LOL... I'm afraid that there are plenty of suckers to take advantage of.

But when you combine the principles of Feng Shui (space harmony) with architecture, the end result is pretty nice living space.

Submitted by sdduuuude on October 16, 2007 - 2:10pm.

In God we Trust. Everyone else bring data.

Those in the "Feng Shui" camp bring no data.

Submitted by FormerSanDiegan on October 16, 2007 - 2:48pm.

I don't know about Feng Shui ...
but there are many reasons I would not to buy that split-level house, facing a T-junction, with the stairwell facing the front door with a pool in the backyard that you can see through the front door, in which the oven and kitchen sink directly face each other. Each of these is inherently a poor/ugly/bad design (well, except maybe the pool).

Submitted by justbought on October 16, 2007 - 2:54pm.

I understand the Y & T-junctions, and the dead end, but why is it bad to have the sink facing the stove, logically speaking?

Submitted by jimmyle on October 16, 2007 - 3:33pm.

The stove in Asia represents wealth. It is also the positive energy (Khi) that ward off the dark energy (sickness, evil spirits, bad luck). The stove is the center of the family because it is responsible for cooking up the foods that feed and grow (physically and emotionally) the family and its members and keep the relationships warm.

The sink, if directly opposing the stove, possibly can put out the fire that keep the family healthy, properous and living in harmony.

Submitted by justbought on October 16, 2007 - 3:51pm.

I mean, is there some other feng shui reason for not having across from each other?

anyways, according to feng shui, is there a remedy, short of moving it? I do use dishwasher most of the time :)

Submitted by Ex-SD on October 16, 2007 - 4:09pm.

It's also important to remember............

*You don't tug on Superman's cape
*You don't spit into the wind
*You don't pull the mask off the old Lone Ranger
*And you don't mess around with Jim..................da do da do...

Submitted by FormerSanDiegan on October 16, 2007 - 4:21pm.

I mean, is there some other feng shui reason for not having across from each other?

Yes. An effective kitchen design is based on the work triangle.

http://www.kitchens.com/01-Kitchen-Desig...

Now, although there are configurations that follow the work triangle methodology that include having the sink and stove across from eachother, this requires a complete 180-degree turn when moving from one to the other. Other configurations that require less than 180-degree turns are significantly more efficient, and are truer to the goal of the work triangle of creating a useful efficient space.

Submitted by justbought on October 16, 2007 - 4:33pm.

Thanks, FormerSanDiegan.

Submitted by patientlywaiting on July 4, 2009 - 11:33pm.

As I said before, I only believe it just for fun. There's really no harm in conforming to Feng Shui principles, so why not?

I just learned there should not be a tree facing the front door, even if it's across the street over at your neighbors'.

Here is what the Feng Shui master told me:

You should cut down the tree; but if it's big tree, you should first ask for permission from the gods of the 5 elements.

Pray silently.

If it's not your tree, try to convince the neighbors to cut it down.

Cutting down the tree improves the flow of Chi (energy).

A house that has a tree facing the front door will be inauspicious for the inhabitants.

First, it will be difficult to find a partner and get married. You will encounter obstacles in many aspects of your life.

If the house has children inhabitants, the children will get sick more frequently.

Trees on the side of the entry door are fine. But the tree should never be right in front of the door.

Many suburban houses have a hardscape walkway to the sidewalk. That's a lot nicer (landscape wise) and better Feng Shui.

An L type walk-way from the driveway to the front entrance is not as good. A tree in front of the entry door is worse.

Submitted by patientlywaiting on July 4, 2009 - 11:38pm.

Visited the renovated Getty Villa in Malibu. Very nice. Must have been nice to live the life a of Roman Senator in Ancient Rome.

Submitted by pepsi on July 5, 2009 - 1:27am.

I wonder what he would say about sunken living room, and raised entrance (the space between the door and the living room) ? Because I absolutely hate them. Generally, I can not see any good from these steps. They seems to be obstacles at best and could be very harmful if you are not too careful at night or for elderly guests.

Submitted by Eugene on July 5, 2009 - 2:55am.

Quote:
I just learned there should not be a tree facing the front door, even if it's across the street over at your neighbors'.

corollary: don't ever, ever buy a house in the woods.

Submitted by ocrenter on July 5, 2009 - 8:10am.

thanks to whomever that revived the thread, I actually missed this post back in 2007.

some of feng shui makes no sense, some actually makes a lot of sense.

for example:

you don't want to be a house facing the end of a T intersection. why in the world would you want to be a sitting duck for an out of control car going directly into your house.

stove and sink should not face each other. the logistic of it makes no sense. if you have two people in the kitchen, they'll most likely be at the stove and at the sink, they'll be bumping into each other to no end.

mirror facing your bed. no brainer. talk about getting a fright when you get up in the middle of the night.

house backing to a canyon. hello, you'll be the first victim of a fire storm. not to mention coyotes and snakes.

do not have front door facing the back door. a thief just enters the front door, gather up all the goodies, and move straight out of the back door.

tree right out of your door. uh, you turn around to say good bye to your family, and oops, bump right into that darn tree!

Submitted by Allan from Fallbrook on July 5, 2009 - 8:24am.

Eugene][quote wrote:
corollary: don't ever, ever buy a house in the woods.

As we all learned from "Little Red Riding Hood".

Submitted by Nor-LA-SD-guy on July 5, 2009 - 8:31am.

I would avoid the T and Y thing if for no other reason than you will turn away about half the future potential buyers and renters for your home.

But hey if they give it to you at 75% off then that's another story.

Just my two cents,

Submitted by Coronita on July 5, 2009 - 8:47am.

Quote:
I wouldn't buy a house that is facing a T-Junction, Y-Junction or dead end road. Also, I would avoid buying a house with the sink and the stove directly facing each other, this can lead to arguments and conflict within the family.

absolutely! :)

Submitted by Nancy_s soothsayer on July 5, 2009 - 9:30am.

This topic I like much!

I bought a house in the middle of two T-junctions like this: [--$*$--]; it has brought me so much good luck, so far. Sometimes I imagine I am the female version of Forrest Gump; destiny keeps dumping blessings and good luck along the way despite long odds. Good karma - please keep them coming.

Now do I have to convince the husband to lop off that young tree nicely growing but facing the front door?

If all the stars align again beautifully, we will close on a second house very near downtown Austin around beginning of November at the lowest-record locked fixed rates at $67/sq ft, brand new, stone/brick elevation, and all-appliances included.

Rationale for buying? The 401K plan has become untrustworthy, in my eyes. The house substitutes as a 401K-savings vehicle from now on.

Wish me luck - oh lucky stars (and PIGGS!)

Submitted by patientrenter on July 5, 2009 - 11:02am.

Not a bad move, Nancy.

But my bias for 401k alternatives is real assets that produce a steady real income. A home can be rented out. In a world where downpayments are not required (FHA 3% less tax credit) and mortgage rates are held low through government action (FNMA and Fed purchases of MBS etc), and there is no real penalty for walking away when underwater, it will be hard to rent any home that can be easily bought instead. Why would anyone want to rent a single family home that they can buy with little or no commitment and at low monthly cost?

I think we have not yet understood the full long term impact of the Great Bailout. Over the next few years, journalists and financial advisors and individuals will digest what is happening now, and come to realize that buying a home with little or no money down is a huge gift from the federal govt when paired with a plan for ruthless default. People will be buying homes with little or no commitment to paying the purchase price, to an even greater degree than in the last bubble.

Certainly people assigned temporarily to one location would prefer to rent, but the population of people in this situation is steady, and we can't all make a retirement living by buying more and more homes and renting them to this small slice of our working population.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.