Earthquake got me pondering, "Am I ready"

User Forum Topic
Submitted by Bubblesitter on February 27, 2010 - 7:00am

This morning's very large 8.8 quake in Chile and recent Haiti quake has pondering the question, "Am I ready for the big one?"

What have you done to prepare? Are you ready?

True they say that us folks in San Diego are at lower risk than our California brethren in LA and San Fran. However, we are still in earthquake country. A big one in LA will be felt down here. Actually, many places you wouldn't consider earthquake prone in the US have had major earthquakes at some point in history, e.g. New Madrid earthquake magnitude 8+ in the midwest

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/s...

Here's an interesting US Geologic Survey site on California earthquakes, it is near realtime reporting of earthquakes via networked ground sensors. When I felt the slight rumble from LA earthquake last year I immediately checked the site.

http://quake.usgs.gov/recenteqs/

So this leads to the question.....What have you done to prepare?

Here's some things I've done (man, I must have too much free time)
1. Emergency supply kit in plastic bucket, with all flashlight, clothes, first aide kit, toiletries, etc. complete list at http://www.sdcounty.ca.gov/oes/ready/
2. A few large water cooler jugs of water, you can get them at home depot for a few bucks. Stored in garage.
3. Hand crank radio/flashlight. Also great for camping, never need batteries.
4. I'm considering a small gas powered generator, enough to power the frigerator and other small appliances.

I may be a bit retentive, but I was a boy scout!

End Bubblesitter Public Service Announcement

BTW...bubblesitter has been Carlsbad homeowner for about year now, after bubble sitting from 2005-2009. Avid reader of piggington since relocation here to San Diego about 5 years back.

Submitted by SanDiegoDave on February 27, 2010 - 10:16am.

A rifle and/or shotgun would be a good idea. Some small game traps. At least get a decent pellet gun.
Also a water purification filter and some chlorine tabs.

Once the food runs out (and there is no government infrastructure in place to provide any more) you'll have to head for the hills and hunt for your own. Plenty of rabbits and other small game to get for food. Print out instructions on how to properly gut & clean them for consumption.

Submitted by Hitler on February 27, 2010 - 12:34pm.

Like most Piggs, I'll be relying on the government to take care of me. Giggitty.

Seriously though, there are some people here who have been preparing for the end of the world for some several years now, so you should get some interesting responses to this post.

On a somewhat related note, has the tsunami hit La Jolla yet?

Submitted by AK on February 27, 2010 - 12:44pm.

Ya never know, I get the impression that the SD area hasn't been studied quite as thoroughly as other populated areas of California and "they" are always finding new earthquake faults.

I've been stockpiling emergency supplies ever since the '70s, when us neighborhood kids decided we were going to survive a nuclear war no matter what our parents said. I still keep a stash of bottled water and Chef Boy-Ar-Dee (needs no preparation nor can opener, and it's so nasty I'm not tempted to eat it in a non-emergency).

I can only hope that in the event of a major disaster, individual Californians prove to be as resourceful and resilient as Haitians.

Submitted by UCGal on February 27, 2010 - 2:00pm.

My husband has a non-Californian fear of earth quakes. (I was born here - I take them as part of the landscape.)

He's also an architect - so he went through and made the house itself more earth quake resistant.... It's a 1960's 2 story tract home. He added more bolts between the sill and foundation. He added a LOT more diagonal bracing... whenever he opens a wall for any reason, he reinforces it. He has taken the corners and replaced the drywall with plywood to add stiffening/sheer wall strength.

As far as generic preparedness - we always have an extra case of bottled water. (the one we're using - and a full spare case.) We have the hand crank flashlights, we have data backed up and ready to grab. We have a lot of camping gear... The idea is that if we have to get out - for fire, earthquake, societal collapse - we've got the basics.

And I shop at Costco... so we always have bulk food. LOL.

Submitted by jpinpb on February 27, 2010 - 3:58pm.

I got this email and so I'm going to post/share it here:

EVERYONE PLEASE READ THIS - IT COULD SOMEDAY, SAVE YOUR LIFE IN AN EARTHQUAKE.

EXTRACT FROM DOUG COPP'S ARTICLE ON THE 'TRIANGLE OF LIFE'

My name is Doug Copp. I am the Rescue Chief and Disaster Manager of the American Rescue Team International (ARTI), the world's most experienced rescue team. The information in this article will save lives in an earthquake.

I have crawled inside 875 collapsed buildings, worked with rescue teams from 60 countries, founded rescue teams in several countries, and I am a member of many rescue teams from many countries.

I was the United Nations expert in Disaster Mitigation for two years. I have worked at every major disaster in the world sinc e 1985, except for simultaneous disasters.

The first building I ever crawled inside of was a school in Mexico City during the 1985 earthquake. Every child was under its desk. Every child was crushed to the thickness of their bones. They could have survived by lying down next to their desks in the aisles. It was obscene, unnecessary and I wondered why the children were not in the aisles. I didn't at the time know that the children were told to hide under something. I am amazed that even today schools are still using the "Duck and Cover" instructions- telling the children to squat under their desks with their heads bowed and covered with their hands. This was the technique used in the Mexico City school..

Simply stated, when buildings collapse, the weight of the ceilings falling upon the objects or furniture inside crushes these objects, leaving a space or void next to them. This space is what I call the 'triangle of life'. The larger the object, the stronger, the less I t will compact. The less the object compacts, the larger the void, the greater the probability that the person who is using this void for safety will not be injured. The next time you watch collapsed buildings, on television, count the 'triangles' you see formed. They are everywhere. It is the most common shape, you will see, in a collapsed building.

TIPS FOR EARTHQUAKE SAFETY

1) Almost everyone who simply 'ducks and covers' when buildings collapse ARE CRUSHED TO DEATH. People who get under objects, like desks or cars, are crushed.

2) Cats, dogs and babies often naturally curl up in the fetal position. You should too in an earthquake. It is a natural safety/survival instinct. That position helps you survive in a smaller void. Get next to an object, next to a sofa, next to a large bulky object that will compress slightly but leave a void next to it.

3) Wooden buildings are the safest type of construction to be in during an earthquake. Wood is flexib Le and moves with the force of the earthquake. If the wooden building does collapse, large survival voids are created. Also, the wooden building has less concentrated, crushing weight. Brick buildings will break into individual bricks. Bricks will cause many injuries but less squashed bodies than concrete slabs. Concrete slab buildings are the most dangerous during an earthquake.

4) If you are in bed during the night and an earthquake occurs, simply roll off the bed. A safe void will exist around the bed. Hotels can achieve a much greater survival rate in earthquakes, simply by posting a sign on the back of the door of every room telling occupants to lie down on the floor, next to the bottom of the bed during an earthquake.

5) If an earthquake happens and you cannot easily escape by getting out the door or window, then lie down and curl up in the fetal position next to a sofa, or large chair.

6) Almost everyone who gets under a doorway when buildings collapse I S kill Ed. How? If you stand under a doorway and the doorjamb falls forward or backward you will be crushed by the ceiling above. If the door jam falls sideways you will be cut in half by the doorway. In either case, you will be killed!

7) Never go to the stairs. The stairs have a different 'moment of frequency (they swing separately from the main part of the building). The stairs and remainder of the building continuously bump into each other until structural failure of the stairs takes place. The people who get on stairs before they fail are chopped up by the stair treads ? Horribly mutilated. Even if the building doesn't collapse, stay away from the stairs. The stairs are a likely part of the building to be damaged. Even if the stairs are not collapsed by the earthquake, they may collapse later when overloaded by fleeing people. They should always be checked for safety, even when the rest of the building is not damaged.

8) Get Near the Outer Walls Of Buildings Or Outside Of Them If Possible - It is much better to be near the outside of the building rather than the interior. The farther inside you are from the outside perimeter of the building the greater the probability that your escape route will be blocked.

9) People inside of their vehicles are crushed when the road above falls in an earthquake and crushes their vehicles; which is exactly what happened with the slabs between the decks of the Nimitz Freeway. The victims of the San Francisco earthquake all stayed inside of their vehicles. They were all killed. They could have easily survived by getting out and lying in the fetal position next to their vehicles. Everyone killed would have survived if they had been able to get out of their cars and sit or lie next to them. All the crushed cars had voids 3 feet high next to them, except for the cars that had columns fall directly across them.

10) I discovered, while crawling inside of collapsed newspaper offices and other offi ces wi th a lot of paper, that paper does not compact. Large voids are found surrounding stacks of paper.

In 1996 we made a film, which proved my survival methodology to be correct. The Turkish Federal Government, City of Istanbul , University of Istanbul Case Productions and ARTI cooperated to film this practical, scientific test. We collapsed a school and a home with 20 mannequins inside. Ten mannequins did 'duck and cover,' and ten mannequins I used in my 'triangle of life' survival method. After the simulated earthquake collapse we crawled through the rubble and entered the building to film and document the results.

The film, in which I practiced my survival techniques under directly observable, scientific conditions, relevant to building collapse, showed there would have been zero percent survival for those doing duck and cover..

There would likely have been 100 percent survivability for people using my method of the 'triangle of life.' This film has been seen by millions of viewers on television inTurkey and the rest of Europe, and it was seen in the USA , Canada and Latin America on the TV program Real TV.

Spread the word and save someone's life... The entire world is experiencing natural calamities so be prepared!

Submitted by CA renter on February 27, 2010 - 4:51pm.

jpinpb wrote:
I got this email and so I'm going to post/share it here:

EVERYONE PLEASE READ THIS - IT COULD SOMEDAY, SAVE YOUR LIFE IN AN EARTHQUAKE.

EXTRACT FROM DOUG COPP'S ARTICLE ON THE 'TRIANGLE OF LIFE'

My name is Doug Copp. I am the Rescue Chief and Disaster Manager of the American Rescue Team International (ARTI), the world's most experienced rescue team. The information in this article will save lives in an earthquake.

I have crawled inside 875 collapsed buildings, worked with rescue teams from 60 countries, founded rescue teams in several countries, and I am a member of many rescue teams from many countries.

I was the United Nations expert in Disaster Mitigation for two years. I have worked at every major disaster in the world sinc e 1985, except for simultaneous disasters.

The first building I ever crawled inside of was a school in Mexico City during the 1985 earthquake. Every child was under its desk. Every child was crushed to the thickness of their bones. They could have survived by lying down next to their desks in the aisles. It was obscene, unnecessary and I wondered why the children were not in the aisles. I didn't at the time know that the children were told to hide under something. I am amazed that even today schools are still using the "Duck and Cover" instructions- telling the children to squat under their desks with their heads bowed and covered with their hands. This was the technique used in the Mexico City school..

Simply stated, when buildings collapse, the weight of the ceilings falling upon the objects or furniture inside crushes these objects, leaving a space or void next to them. This space is what I call the 'triangle of life'. The larger the object, the stronger, the less I t will compact. The less the object compacts, the larger the void, the greater the probability that the person who is using this void for safety will not be injured. The next time you watch collapsed buildings, on television, count the 'triangles' you see formed. They are everywhere. It is the most common shape, you will see, in a collapsed building.

TIPS FOR EARTHQUAKE SAFETY

1) Almost everyone who simply 'ducks and covers' when buildings collapse ARE CRUSHED TO DEATH. People who get under objects, like desks or cars, are crushed.

2) Cats, dogs and babies often naturally curl up in the fetal position. You should too in an earthquake. It is a natural safety/survival instinct. That position helps you survive in a smaller void. Get next to an object, next to a sofa, next to a large bulky object that will compress slightly but leave a void next to it.

3) Wooden buildings are the safest type of construction to be in during an earthquake. Wood is flexib Le and moves with the force of the earthquake. If the wooden building does collapse, large survival voids are created. Also, the wooden building has less concentrated, crushing weight. Brick buildings will break into individual bricks. Bricks will cause many injuries but less squashed bodies than concrete slabs. Concrete slab buildings are the most dangerous during an earthquake.

4) If you are in bed during the night and an earthquake occurs, simply roll off the bed. A safe void will exist around the bed. Hotels can achieve a much greater survival rate in earthquakes, simply by posting a sign on the back of the door of every room telling occupants to lie down on the floor, next to the bottom of the bed during an earthquake.

5) If an earthquake happens and you cannot easily escape by getting out the door or window, then lie down and curl up in the fetal position next to a sofa, or large chair.

6) Almost everyone who gets under a doorway when buildings collapse I S kill Ed. How? If you stand under a doorway and the doorjamb falls forward or backward you will be crushed by the ceiling above. If the door jam falls sideways you will be cut in half by the doorway. In either case, you will be killed!

7) Never go to the stairs. The stairs have a different 'moment of frequency (they swing separately from the main part of the building). The stairs and remainder of the building continuously bump into each other until structural failure of the stairs takes place. The people who get on stairs before they fail are chopped up by the stair treads ? Horribly mutilated. Even if the building doesn't collapse, stay away from the stairs. The stairs are a likely part of the building to be damaged. Even if the stairs are not collapsed by the earthquake, they may collapse later when overloaded by fleeing people. They should always be checked for safety, even when the rest of the building is not damaged.

8) Get Near the Outer Walls Of Buildings Or Outside Of Them If Possible - It is much better to be near the outside of the building rather than the interior. The farther inside you are from the outside perimeter of the building the greater the probability that your escape route will be blocked.

9) People inside of their vehicles are crushed when the road above falls in an earthquake and crushes their vehicles; which is exactly what happened with the slabs between the decks of the Nimitz Freeway. The victims of the San Francisco earthquake all stayed inside of their vehicles. They were all killed. They could have easily survived by getting out and lying in the fetal position next to their vehicles. Everyone killed would have survived if they had been able to get out of their cars and sit or lie next to them. All the crushed cars had voids 3 feet high next to them, except for the cars that had columns fall directly across them.

10) I discovered, while crawling inside of collapsed newspaper offices and other offi ces wi th a lot of paper, that paper does not compact. Large voids are found surrounding stacks of paper.

In 1996 we made a film, which proved my survival methodology to be correct. The Turkish Federal Government, City of Istanbul , University of Istanbul Case Productions and ARTI cooperated to film this practical, scientific test. We collapsed a school and a home with 20 mannequins inside. Ten mannequins did 'duck and cover,' and ten mannequins I used in my 'triangle of life' survival method. After the simulated earthquake collapse we crawled through the rubble and entered the building to film and document the results.

The film, in which I practiced my survival techniques under directly observable, scientific conditions, relevant to building collapse, showed there would have been zero percent survival for those doing duck and cover..

There would likely have been 100 percent survivability for people using my method of the 'triangle of life.' This film has been seen by millions of viewers on television inTurkey and the rest of Europe, and it was seen in the USA , Canada and Latin America on the TV program Real TV.

Spread the word and save someone's life... The entire world is experiencing natural calamities so be prepared!

One thing that might be helpful with this information (which I've also heard before from emergency rescue people) is to go through your office and home with your co-workers and family, and discuss where everyone would go in each room if an earthquake were to hit. Note the position of furniture and windows, doors, etc.

In California, it's a good idea to have an "earthquake plan" as well as a "fire plan" for your family.

Thanks for posting this, Bubblesitter. Good info for all.

UCGal, you're lucky to have a husband who can do the retrofitting. Very good ideas.

Submitted by edna_mode on February 27, 2010 - 7:11pm.

Hmmm...snopes and the American Red Cross give a different perspective:

http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/household/...

http://urbanlegends.about.com/gi/dynamic...

***

It would seem you need to account whether or not you live in a country with strongly enforced earthquake codes (i.e. buildings that don't pancake) in your assessment of what to do in an earthquake.

Submitted by Hitler on February 27, 2010 - 7:27pm.

Would you rather be in these cars or lying beside them?

crushed cars

Submitted by CA renter on February 27, 2010 - 8:00pm.

Hitler wrote:
Would you rather be in these cars or lying beside them?

crushed cars

Exactly.

While they are correct about our building codes being different from other countries (despite the "capitalists" who complain about bureaucratic red tape and govt meddling), the information is still useful. I was there for the Northridge quake, and the majority of the people who were killed were killed by a building that pancaked, IIRC (older building with first-floor apts and carports). The first-floor residents were crushed, and maybe some of the second-floor residents were crushed as well. Not sure if this "triangle of life" would have saved them, but building collapses are usually the biggest immediate threat in an earthquake.

Either way, it's just good to know different perspectives so that people can plan accordingly.

Submitted by sdgrrl on February 28, 2010 - 2:35am.

I appreciate all the the posters comments:

I appreciate the knowledge of "the triangle of life". You learn something new everyday. Instinctively, I feel being outside is best, but if caught in the middle of the night- I'd probably crawl under my bed. It makes sense however things may fall straight down, but it's nice to have a buffer to catch the full impact and by gravity weight will slant.

It's sad, but thinking about it you are right those individuals who simply stayed in their cars-were crushed like pancakes.

Growing up in Texas, we were told during tornadoes to go along the wall and crouch. Lucky enough one never passed over us (I always had visions of school children swirling in the air). Your experience in Mexico is touching and sad. I truly hope you are running a blog or giving seminars on earthquake safety awareness. Thank you for the information.

The idea for companies to implement an emergency earthquake plan is a good one and I'm surprised that all the companies I worked with never even mentioned it. Gives me something to look forward too on Tuesday when I go back to work.

Oddly, last night I told my fiance that I felt a big quake coming. I don't know if the earthquakes in Chile, Okinawa and Haiti released tension, or made those tectonic plates even more stressed and compacted?

It's just been too darn quiet in LA and San Fran, but I don't want to spread any bad mojo.

A lot of good information and an eye opening post- thanks all!

Submitted by Bubblesitter on April 4, 2010 - 7:27pm.

I was checking out the USGS earthquake website over at a friends house while having Easter dinner outside.

My first real SoCal quake today, I actually quite enjoyed it. I was outside and just watched it in awe. The local So californian who later joined the party said she was screaming so hard her throat was still sore.

Submitted by Bubblesitter on March 11, 2011 - 7:21pm.

Japan has the best earthquake prep in the world. If this happens here we are hosed.

You won't be able to depend on a completely overwhelmed public safety system.

Bubblesitter

Submitted by paramount on March 11, 2011 - 10:39pm.

Is an earthquake of magnitude 8.0+ even possible around Southern California?

Submitted by CA renter on March 12, 2011 - 12:39am.

Yes, but I sure don't want to be here when it happens.

FWIW, we do seem to get "sister quakes" (not sure of the real terminology) when something like this hits Japan, and vice-versa.

Do be prepared for an earthquake in the near future. Stock up today!

Submitted by carlsbadworker on March 12, 2011 - 9:25am.

"The triangle of life" is a controversial theory that was rejected by United States Geological Survey & Red Cross, etc.

http://www.earthquakecountry.info/dropco...

Submitted by meadandale on March 12, 2011 - 9:53am.

paramount wrote:
Is an earthquake of magnitude 8.0+ even possible around Southern California?

Probably not. All of the faults here (including the san andreas) are slip faults (transform plate boundaries). The quakes in japan, chile and indonesia were all caused by convergent subduction faults (convergent plate boundaries). They generate much larger earthquakes. There is a large subduction fault that runs from northern california past the PNW up into alaska that could generate an 8.0 quake however.

Submitted by UCGal on March 12, 2011 - 9:57am.

paramount wrote:
Is an earthquake of magnitude 8.0+ even possible around Southern California?

From what the "experts" were saying on the TeeVee yesterday SoCal could "only" get up to an 8.0 earthquake - max.

The fault that runs from British Columbia down through Mt. Shasta - along the coast of WA and OR is similar to the one that is active in Japan right now...
Rainier, St. Helens, etc are proof that this fault is active. That's the fault that could go "big".

Submitted by bearishgurl on March 12, 2011 - 10:28am.

UCGal wrote:
From what the "experts" were saying on the TeeVee yesterday SoCal could "only" get up to an 8.0 earthquake - max.

The fault that runs from British Columbia down through Mt. Shasta - along the coast of WA and OR is similar to the one that is active in Japan right now...
Rainier, St. Helens, etc are proof that this fault is active. That's the fault that could go "big".

Arrrrgggh!! That "baby-boomer mecca" in the giant redwoods and Mt Shasta are on my retirement "short list." :=O

Submitted by Bubblesitter on November 1, 2012 - 8:45pm.

Wow.....the east coast was really hit hard with Sandy.

I'm reassessing my general disaster preparedness this week.

Extended power outages really causes a lot of pain. I'm gonna be getting some quotes for a natural gas backup generator.

Every natural disaster you see the same thing......long lines at gas stations. Not because of lack of gas, but due to no power to the pumps.

Gas stations should be mandated to have back up gas generators to power the pumps

Submitted by spdrun on November 1, 2012 - 9:09pm.

Actually, the problem is a real gasoline shortage at this point. Refineries, railroads, ports, and pipelines closed, and only a limited amount can be trucked in from points south.

Gas stations shouldn't be mandated to have generators, or to even remain open. They're NOT a public utility, despite what most entitled Americans delude themselves of.

Submitted by paramount on November 1, 2012 - 9:16pm.

The only think I can think that should have mandated backup power is frickin elevators - at least enough reserve battery power to lower the elevator to the next lowest safe floor and open the doors.

Submitted by Bubblesitter on November 1, 2012 - 9:45pm.

I'm sure you guys will the first to grumble about waiting hours in long lines to fill your tanks after the next earthquake or (fill in your disaster de jour)

I suppose if you fully believe in the free market, enlightened gas station owners who made the investment to put in the backup generator should be able to recoup it by price gouging during emergencies. I''m actually ok with that.

Submitted by spdrun on November 1, 2012 - 10:10pm.

The problem is actual lack of gas, not lack of power to pump it. Though I anticipated such a thing and have enough food for a week if deliveries slow down due to lack of fuel.

Not grumbling. Sh!t happens, you deal with it. There will always be something. Emergency generators can flood, gas contaminate with water, who knows?

Rush hour into NYC on the 59th St. Bridge this fine morning. I was actually headed in the opposite direction, to a client appointment in Queens, which made the ride quite a bit of ... fun:

Submitted by Bubblesitter on November 2, 2012 - 2:55am.

Take care out there spdrun, I was was watching the news out last night, some folks are really hit hard out there. Whole neighborhoods destroyed out there, i'm gonna make a donation to the relief efforts. There is big fund raiser on National TV tonight with the Boss and others.

Yes fundamental supply problem also some refineries out of commission and probably some logistics and transportation issues, some of the news I was hearing was that there were bunch of stations that had full underground gas tanks were still closed due to no power for pumps.

I wonder if it makes sense to have prepositioned in metropolitan areas a strategic gas reserve, sorta like the srategic oil reserve but on liocal level. May not be practical storing gas for extended period. Anyhow, just thinking.

My bro forwarded me a interesting story about how vulnerable our national electric grid is. Not only is it vulnerable to cyberattack but also Solar super storms. The probability of this blackswan event is much higher than I thought, with power to big swathes of US out for months and $Trillion dollar hit to economy.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/08/0...

Submitted by The-Shoveler on November 2, 2012 - 7:54am.

For all the PITB a septic system can be,

there are times it's priceless.

Submitted by moneymaker on November 2, 2012 - 9:23am.

I think I'm ready. Have a gas generator, boat full of gas, literally. Have an RV to stay in if the house is destroyed, weeks of food and water, thanks to rain barrels. By the way this is my first post from a smart phone.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on November 2, 2012 - 4:51pm.

So what are the chances they would say, hey the damage was not a real quake, it was caused by a passing truck maybe.

ZERO !!

Don't get me wrong it's not that I am against them doing this it's just that I think there would be Zero chance of the CEA ponying up the deductible on the claims.

East Coast homeowners saved from hurricane deductibles

Hurricane Sandy is shaping out to be one of the costliest hurricanes in U.S. history, with early damage estimates in the range of $30 billion to $50 billion, reports Barclays Capital.

For homeowners impacted by Hurricane Sandy, many will not have to pay costly hurricane deductibles before insurance coverage goes into effect.

Various homeowner insurance policies have a deductible based on a property’s insured value, which ranges from 1% to 5%.

For example, if there is a 5% deductible for a home that is insured for $300,000, the homeowner would pay $15,000 before receiving money from the insurance company.

The National Weather Service declared Hurricane Sandy as a “tropical storm” and as a result, homeowners in New Jersey, Maryland, New York and Connecticut are subject to pay costly hurricane insurance deductibles.

In New Jersey, for example, the Department of Banking and Insurance informed state insurers that hurricane deductibles do not apply because under state law, two requirements need to be met: it must be classified as a hurricane by The National Weather Service when it hits the state and winds must sustain 74mph inland.

Connecticut law must issue a hurricane warning for the state in order for the deductible to go into effect.

“The state moved very swiftly to alert the industry that this storm — although devastating to so many — did not meet the criteria for a hurricane deductible under state law,” said Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy in a statement.

In New York, homeowners do not have to pay for hurricane deductibles, said Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

"Insurers should understand the Department of Financial Services will be monitoring how claims are handled,” he said in a statement.

Submitted by paramount on November 2, 2012 - 9:22pm.

I really want to believe this didn't happen as reported/implied, but if it's even close to the truth this pussy is a TOTAL POS to say the least:

http://www.cnn.com/video/?hpt=hp_c3#/vid...

Submitted by CA renter on November 3, 2012 - 2:11am.

Though he tried to hide it, he looked shocked when they told him that the kids were found dead. Almost had a guilty look cross his face for the briefest of moments. It's easy to see how someone might not be able to tell the difference between a man or a woman in a storm like this, and he was probably suspicious of looters/criminals, etc., but still...

This story is absolutely horrible.

Submitted by Aecetia on November 3, 2012 - 9:40am.

paramount wrote:
I really want to believe this didn't happen as reported/implied, but if it's even close to the truth this pussy is a TOTAL POS to say the least:

http://www.cnn.com/video/?hpt=hp_c3#/video/weather/2012/11/01/ac-tuchman-sandy-staten-island-brothers-tragedy.cnn

I agree. This is sickening.

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