BBQ's

User Forum Topic
Submitted by Raybyrnes on May 18, 2010 - 11:57pm

Is there any truth that BBQ prices drop in September?

Any one have any arguments against buying a Webber?

Submitted by outtamojo on May 19, 2010 - 12:06am.

I haven't been in the bbq market in a while- probably cause I got a Weber(gas). It's been thoroughly abused for about 8 years now and still works like a charm. Gas or charcoal?

Keep checking this site for deals http://slickdeals.net/sdsearch.php?searc...

I typed in "Weber" for you.

Submitted by svelte on May 19, 2010 - 7:14am.

Oh, I love my Weber.

There is something about charcoal that is head and shoulders above gas, IMO. I use the stack cannister with newspaper underneath to heat the brickets, thus avoiding the lighter fluid taste.

We're actually beginning a "discussion" right now about a back-yard redesign. I'm pushing for staying with a portable charcoal weber...wife wants a built-in gas BBQ. She claims she would bbq if we had one. I never saw her use the previous portable gas unit we had. It will be interesting to see how this discussion ends up. :-)

I just have the cheap $100 Weber Gold, can't stomach the thought of paying several hundred more dollars for something that does the same thing. Only drawback to my unit is that it can only cook about 8-10 burgers at a time. But on the rare times I need to cook more, we just wheel a neighbors' over and have two grills going. Shoot, I could even buy a second grill and still only have $200 invested!

Submitted by meadandale on May 19, 2010 - 7:20am.

I have a weber gas grill and really like it.

Something nice about being able to turn on the gas, wait 5 minutes and bbq some chicken or steaks on a summer evening and not have to fuss with the charcoal or the charcoal starter or the 15-20 wait time until the coals are hot enough to cook over.

Now, you want to talk about low and slow...that's where my smoker comes in. It takes almost 20 hours to bbq a pork shoulder (pork butt) so the charcoal startup time doesn't really matter at that point.

FWIW I have something like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Weber-Model-329000...

It has the flip up work areas on each side and a small burner on one side for keeping baste hot or cooking beans or whatever.

Submitted by Raybyrnes on May 19, 2010 - 7:20am.

Good Info on the EP 310 vs the E 310. One thing I notice about the Genesis vs the Summit is the fact that the genesis has the Burner button on the side eliminating that surface. The Summit has the burner button in the front although it also comes with a price tag around around 1200.

Submitted by UCGal on May 19, 2010 - 8:57am.

My husband was given a Weber kettle barbeque over 20 years ago when a neighbor moved. It's still in good shape despite having never been kept indoors.

We're also looking at a backyard project and will incorporate the option of keeping the Weber charcoal or a gas bbq. (In other words - nothing permanently mounted).

Submitted by NotCranky on May 19, 2010 - 9:56am.

svelte wrote:
Oh, I love my Weber.

There is something about charcoal that is head and shoulders above gas, IMO. I use the stack cannister with newspaper underneath to heat the brickets, thus avoiding the lighter fluid taste.

We're actually beginning a "discussion" right now about a back-yard redesign. I'm pushing for staying with a portable charcoal weber...wife wants a built-in gas BBQ. She claims she would bbq if we had one. I never saw her use the previous portable gas unit we had. It will be interesting to see how this discussion ends up. :-)

I just have the cheap $100 Weber Gold, can't stomach the thought of paying several hundred more dollars for something that does the same thing. Only drawback to my unit is that it can only cook about 8-10 burgers at a time. But on the rare times I need to cook more, we just wheel a neighbors' over and have two grills going. Shoot, I could even buy a second grill and still only have $200 invested!

I have the Weber Genesis. It is parked right outside the kitchen door and my wife does use it!She cooks on it as much or more than I do now. She will sometimes just grill peppers or asparagus or other things for a side dish or cook the main item. Get her a basket for shrimp, a cast iron skillet for fajitas( we have a square one made for grills)... and lots of other cookery items :).

At my old house, I had a rustic brick and mortar wood or charcoal bbq and I still can cook with wood over the fire ring, but my wife would not/will do any of those things.

I don't see any big enough advantages of built in grills that overcome the benefits of portability. If I ever have one built in it would be a big wood burning thing with a hand cranking lift type grill, like they use at the fair. A good outdoor structure to work and serve from, maybe a sink and fridge, would be nice.

Submitted by XBoxBoy on May 19, 2010 - 10:09am.

A little off topic, but I used to have a Wolf stove with a grill in it. (This was indoors) The advantage of having the grill inside as part of the kitchen is huge in my opinion. You have to have a big range hood, with a lot of pull but it's worth it.

If you think about it, most restaurants have an indoor grill, and there's no reason not to have one in your house. You just need to have sufficient ventilation.

Submitted by Coronita on May 19, 2010 - 10:12am.

Russell wrote:
svelte wrote:
Oh, I love my Weber.

There is something about charcoal that is head and shoulders above gas, IMO. I use the stack cannister with newspaper underneath to heat the brickets, thus avoiding the lighter fluid taste.

We're actually beginning a "discussion" right now about a back-yard redesign. I'm pushing for staying with a portable charcoal weber...wife wants a built-in gas BBQ. She claims she would bbq if we had one. I never saw her use the previous portable gas unit we had. It will be interesting to see how this discussion ends up. :-)

I just have the cheap $100 Weber Gold, can't stomach the thought of paying several hundred more dollars for something that does the same thing. Only drawback to my unit is that it can only cook about 8-10 burgers at a time. But on the rare times I need to cook more, we just wheel a neighbors' over and have two grills going. Shoot, I could even buy a second grill and still only have $200 invested!

I have the Weber Genesis. It is parked right outside the kitchen door and my wife does use it!She cooks on it as much or more than I do now. She will sometimes just grill peppers or asparagus or other things for a side dish or cook the main item. Get her a basket for shrimp, a cast iron skillet for fajitas( we have a square one made for grills)... and lots of other cookery items :).

At my old house, I had a rustic brick and mortar wood or charcoal bbq and I still can cook with wood over the fire ring, but my wife would not/will do any of those things.

I don't see any big enough advantages of built in grills that overcome the benefits of portability. If I ever have one built in it would be a big wood burning thing with a hand cranking lift type grill, like they use at the fair. A good outdoor structure to work and serve from, maybe a sink and fridge, would be nice.

+1

Genesis is good. Something to think about when you get a BBQ. Don't go for the cheapest ones...A lot of the cheaper ones are made overseas (take a wild guess where), and while that it's bad in itself, some of the quality is really horrible. Stainless steel and paint that rusts after a couple of contacts with water/fog/etc, peeling grill irons, cheap burners that clog,etc

Submitted by weberlin on May 19, 2010 - 10:20am.

svelte wrote:
Oh, I love my Weber.
:-)

Thanks for all the support, guys!

Weber Lin

Submitted by Enorah on May 19, 2010 - 10:21am.

We have the Char Griller

charcoal variety

cast iron grates, baby! Can't beat them

We might also get a gas grill for the easy, but we love our char griller

We have the fire side box for smoking, too

I just read that the char griller has a duo version

one side gas/one side charcoal

Submitted by sdduuuude on May 19, 2010 - 10:29am.

Have gas at home and usually cook on charcoal when we camp. But ...

Last camping trip we made hamburgers that were just incredible and we started wondering if we shouldn't have a charcoal grill for the house.
They were so good. Months later, the kids still remember them and rate them as "best burger ever"

I certainly don't want to whip out the charcoal every time we grill, but would be nice to have the option for special occaisions.

Submitted by sdduuuude on May 19, 2010 - 10:29am.

weberlin wrote:
svelte wrote:
Oh, I love my Weber.
:-)

Thanks for all the support, guys!

Weber Lin

That's just silly.

Submitted by LAAFTERHOURS on May 19, 2010 - 12:19pm.

I have a weber performer, replaced the disposable gas cans with a propane tank fulltime. When I build my outdoor kitchen, my plan is to keep the performer in some capacity. I plan to put in a gas range as well as drop my performer base and cover in with a cabinet below (so the ashes can be accessed for removal). I will run the gas line to both, so I can use the gas line to prime the charcoal and still use the quicker gas range when needed.

Sounds awesome in theory, but we shall see.

Submitted by Hobie on May 19, 2010 - 9:27pm.

Weber for the good meat. Gasser for the quick stuff. Run a natural gas line for an outdoor heater while you are at it. Very nice. ..

Submitted by moneymaker on May 20, 2010 - 11:59am.

Take a magnet with you when you go shopping for a grill, if the magnet sticks to it don't buy it. Anything not stainless will eventually rust.

Submitted by Coronita on May 20, 2010 - 12:27pm.

LAAFTERHOURS wrote:
I have a weber performer, replaced the disposable gas cans with a propane tank fulltime. When I build my outdoor kitchen, my plan is to keep the performer in some capacity. I plan to put in a gas range as well as drop my performer base and cover in with a cabinet below (so the ashes can be accessed for removal). I will run the gas line to both, so I can use the gas line to prime the charcoal and still use the quicker gas range when needed.

Sounds awesome in theory, but we shall see.

Um, I could be wrong about this. But I don't think have a BBQ with dual fuel (propane and natural gas),

Also, if your BBQ was propane, you would need to convert it into natural gas, which I think involves removing the regulator and possibly enlarging the opening in the control orifices so that gas can flow at a lower setting.
Propane I believe it at a much higher pressure versus NG from your home, which I think is why you would need to make these changes. (Haven't done this myself though).

Submitted by CDMA ENG on May 20, 2010 - 3:08pm.

LAAFTERHOURS wrote:
I have a weber performer, replaced the disposable gas cans with a propane tank fulltime. When I build my outdoor kitchen, my plan is to keep the performer in some capacity. I plan to put in a gas range as well as drop my performer base and cover in with a cabinet below (so the ashes can be accessed for removal). I will run the gas line to both, so I can use the gas line to prime the charcoal and still use the quicker gas range when needed.

Sounds awesome in theory, but we shall see.

My version of a Weber Performer... Doesn't cook as well but you don't look as good as me standing on it either! :P

http://www.longboardhouse.com/images/96_...

When I was five my dad found a huge cast metal water tank (at least I hope it was water) it took us an hour to push it back home. He had a welder come out and cut it off towards the bottom and we did all our cooking around that fire-pit / BBQ. One of my fondest childhood memories...

Finally rusted out the bottom a couple of years ago...

And yes the regulators are different but I think there a dual mode model out there...

CE

Submitted by LAAFTERHOURS on May 20, 2010 - 3:26pm.

flu wrote:
LAAFTERHOURS wrote:
I have a weber performer, replaced the disposable gas cans with a propane tank fulltime. When I build my outdoor kitchen, my plan is to keep the performer in some capacity. I plan to put in a gas range as well as drop my performer base and cover in with a cabinet below (so the ashes can be accessed for removal). I will run the gas line to both, so I can use the gas line to prime the charcoal and still use the quicker gas range when needed.

Sounds awesome in theory, but we shall see.

Um, I could be wrong about this. But I don't think have a BBQ with dual fuel (propane and natural gas),

Also, if your BBQ was propane, you would need to convert it into natural gas, which I think involves removing the regulator and possibly enlarging the opening in the control orifices so that gas can flow at a lower setting.
Propane I believe it at a much higher pressure versus NG from your home, which I think is why you would need to make these changes. (Haven't done this myself though).

I would keep the weber shell, run natural gas lines to the gas grill and the weber. Propane days will be over.

Submitted by svelte on May 20, 2010 - 6:15pm.

Well maybe two grills is the way to go, as meadandale, Enorah, and Hobie have done.

Charcoal for when I cook, gas for her (hey, anything that causes her to cook more of the meals has gotta be a good thing, eh?).

And the $100 Weber Gold is stainless steel, flu. Like UCGal, mine is a decade old and looks new - on the outside anyway. :-)

And we all love you too, Weber Lin...

Maybe I'll bbq tonight...you all are wetting my appetite...

Submitted by meadandale on May 21, 2010 - 7:14am.

svelte wrote:

Maybe I'll bbq tonight...you all are wetting my appetite...

Ugh...4 weeks into my 3 week backyard demo and remodel and still not done. I'll be happy when my nice new back patio and patio cover are finished so I can move my bbq out of my driveway and start thinking about cooking outdoors again. The afternoons/evenings have been quite pleasant lately.

It's starting to come along though..a few more weeks.

Before:

Now:

Submitted by desmond on May 21, 2010 - 7:28am.

meadandale wrote:
svelte wrote:

Maybe I'll bbq tonight...you all are wetting my appetite...

Ugh...4 weeks into my 3 week backyard demo and remodel and still not done.

Mead, great looking patio. Make sure you use large lumber on the patio cover so it does not warp or the paint does not peel every year. Also, why did they put a support pole so close to the back door?

Submitted by meadandale on May 21, 2010 - 7:44am.

desmond wrote:
meadandale wrote:
svelte wrote:

Maybe I'll bbq tonight...you all are wetting my appetite...

Ugh...4 weeks into my 3 week backyard demo and remodel and still not done.

Mead, great looking patio. Make sure you use large lumber on the patio cover so it does not warp or the paint does not peel every year. Also, why did they put a support pole so close to the back door?

They are using 4x4 posts and 4x8 cross beams. The beams from the house to the edge of the patio will be 2x8.

They had to put posts on the house side because there is no way they could attach a 2x8 brace to my facia. With the drip shield on the facia, they'd only be able to get 3-4 inches of board up there with quite a bit hanging down. Removing the facia wasn't an option since it's on 1" so we still wouldn't have been able to get a 2" board in there.

Trust me, I didn't want posts on the house side but we went back and forth on this and he didn't think they could find a way to do it. Since I"m already about 30% over budget I didn't want to explore options that would require even more damage to the house and need for more stucco repair and repainting. We finally found a post placement that kept the posts from sitting right in front of my windows. The post just outside the door should be ok. You'll step right past it.

Everything has been about compromise on this project. You should see all the crap we found buried in my backyard that we didn't know was there...

By the way, the patio cover is going to be stained redwood and there is going to be a cedar shed on the side of the yard stained to match.

Submitted by meadandale on May 21, 2010 - 7:49am.

Shed is going here:

Gonna look something like this:

BTW, I've been doing a photo diary of all the demo and construction...it's posted below. It's been a pretty amazing transformation. I'm glad I took pictures so I'll remember what it used to look like.

http://picasaweb.google.com/meadandale/B...

Submitted by meadandale on May 21, 2010 - 7:49am.

BTW, sorry for the thread jack ;-)

Submitted by Hobie on May 21, 2010 - 12:01pm.

Nice work Mead.

Submitted by desmond on May 21, 2010 - 12:39pm.

Mead, I like the color concrete. See if your contractor will stain the wood before installation, you can do some minor touch up after. You do not want the stain getting on the concrete. Really nice job, that is a lot of concrete. Did they run drainage pipes out the side of the house?

Submitted by meadandale on May 21, 2010 - 3:16pm.

desmond wrote:
Mead, I like the color concrete. See if your contractor will stain the wood before installation, you can do some minor touch up after. You do not want the stain getting on the concrete. Really nice job, that is a lot of concrete. Did they run drainage pipes out the side of the house?

All the wood is getting stained before it is put up. We didn't do any drainage. The patio slopes away from the house at 1/4" per foot. The side walkway they did also slopes away from the house and towards the driveway.

Submitted by desmond on May 21, 2010 - 3:54pm.

It is the water that drains off the patio that is the concern, just make sure it has some place to go. Even in S.D. you can get some downpours.

Submitted by svelte on May 22, 2010 - 7:54am.

That does look great, Mead.

Back yard is light years ahead of where it was, and it's not even done yet!

Love the curved step down to the side yard cement, a nice touch that most people wouldn't have thought of

Submitted by CA renter on May 22, 2010 - 11:40pm.

That patio should look nice with the redwood. Are you doing a lot of the work yourself?

If you don't mind my asking, about how much do you think it will cost for the entire project (from demo through final landscape?).

Hope you get to enjoy your new patio soon. Thanks for sharing your project with us. :)

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