Bad Neighbors

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Submitted by MistaVista on January 14, 2014 - 2:57pm

I am looking for suggestions on dealing with problematic neighbors in a non HOA neighborhood. The neighborhood is pretty nice for the most part with the exception of a few bad apples. I am not sure if there is even anything illegal occurring but one 1600 sq. ft home for example has about 20-25 people living in it (my neighbor). You can see a considerable effort from a large percentage of the neighborhood to improve their homes and the community but these sore thumbs are killing everyone's property value. Is it worth trying to start a HOA or does anyone have any other suggestions?

Submitted by spdrun on January 14, 2014 - 3:04pm.

Even if you did start an HOA, there's nothing that can force them to opt into the unholy thing.

If they really have 20+ people living in a 3-4 bedroom home, research your city's/town's health codes. There's probably a minimum square footage per person, max people per bathroom, etc.

One could always tip the health department about a vermin problem and let them investigate.

Then again, you chose to live in a non-HOA-infected neighborhood, which comes with many advantages and a few disadvantages. Short of there being an actual health/safety hazard to yourself, I'd do exactly nothing. No point in making enemies or hurting people who are possibly sharing because they're working hard for little money.

Submitted by njtosd on January 14, 2014 - 10:40pm.

You might also try to figure out the zoning laws relating to the area. You can search zoning here:
http://www.sandiego.gov/development-serv...

Submitted by UCGal on January 15, 2014 - 6:59am.

I'm probably wrong about this but IIRC the zoning las that specify max number of people factor in whether the occupants are related or just roommates. I read this in context of anti-mini dorms regulations for the SDSU area.

If the are related/family you'll have less recourse.

Submitted by joec on January 15, 2014 - 7:41pm.

On a related note, can you limit how many people live in your rental? I assume the standard forms would have some restriction, but wasn't sure if that would apply if these people were related...

I assume number of people aren't a protected class, but probably a newborn son/daughter would definitely be. Of course, nothing stops you from raising rent to insane levels (unless rent controlled), but it seems like it would be a nightmare if multiple families lived in your house...or even super super large families (more wear and tear).

Submitted by spdrun on January 15, 2014 - 7:56pm.

I've understood that anything more than two people per bedroom plus one can be cause for eviction without risk of being sued for discrimination.

Submitted by mike92104 on January 15, 2014 - 8:01pm.

I would try to find out if the house is rented or owned. If rented, contact the landlord and make sure they know how many people are living there.

Submitted by CA renter on January 16, 2014 - 1:31am.

spdrun wrote:
Even if you did start an HOA, there's nothing that can force them to opt into the unholy thing.

If they really have 20+ people living in a 3-4 bedroom home, research your city's/town's health codes. There's probably a minimum square footage per person, max people per bathroom, etc.

One could always tip the health department about a vermin problem and let them investigate.

Then again, you chose to live in a non-HOA-infected neighborhood, which comes with many advantages and a few disadvantages. Short of there being an actual health/safety hazard to yourself, I'd do exactly nothing. No point in making enemies or hurting people who are possibly sharing because they're working hard for little money.

I concur. There are plenty of HOA neighborhoods where everybody gets to tell everyone else how to live their lives...right down the which colors they can paint their houses, to what plants they can plant in their own yards, to whether or not they can park their own cars in their own driveways (or keep garage doors open for more than a few minutes). While I appreciate the desire to get rid of the few bad apples (totally get the desire to get rid of truly bad apples), it might be a good idea to choose your battles.

If the neighbors are committing crimes or making the neighborhood truly unsafe in some way -- or even if their cars are lined up and down the streets, preventing people from parking in front of their own houses -- that might be a good reason to say something (perhaps to the residents first). If it's just because you perceive them as doing something that "lowers property values," that's a bit more questionable, IMHO. Many people value the freedom that allows people to make their own decisions regarding their homes, and they are more than willing to pay extra for these freedoms.

Just my 2 cents.

Submitted by EastandWestCstr on January 16, 2014 - 9:21am.

(deleted)

Submitted by CDMA ENG on January 16, 2014 - 8:36pm.

If it 20 to 25 latinos it might be a situation where they are illegals working for a company that has brought them up from south of the border.

There was a fast food company in Phoenix that was importing illegals to work in thier company and they had large amount of people living in one house and the company had four or five of these houses around the valley.

I want to say the company was Roberto's...

Anyway these houses are common place in the PHX area and get raid by ICE all the time.

You might have something similiarly going on or a mule house...

CE

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