The Donald Trump, Illegal Alien, Foreigner, Immigrant Bitch and Moan Thread

User Forum Topic
Submitted by Coronita on June 22, 2016 - 7:13am

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 26, 2016 - 11:36pm.

SD Trolley map

Only the first 9 stops of the blue line (San Ysidro being the first stop) would be used to embark/disembark by border-crossing students attending public schools in the four districts listed in my most recent post.

See: https://www.transit.wiki/San_Diego_Troll...

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 27, 2016 - 12:00am.

Ha ha, I ran across this 9-year old article earlier from little, hot, dusty Calexico (been there a few times, lol). The school district there has employed someone to take photos of students crossing the border to attend public school there. And knock on doors of "guardians" of students suspected of living in MX. Hilarious!

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/22454322/ns/us...

It's border crossing only had two gates last time I was there!

Not all districts on board
Jesus Gandara, superintendent of the Sweetwater district, with 44,000 students along San Diego's border with Mexico, said tracking children at the border goes too far. "If you do that, you're playing immigration agent," he said.

Notice how Gandara didn't seem too concerned. And neither did his predecessor OR successor (formerly the CVESD superintendent). They're not "concerned" because they don't really want to know. If SUHSD suddenly should lose 10K+ of their (non-resident) students, they would have to do massive layoffs. That would certainly put a dent in the super's "umbrella of influence." It's very simple. Less students = less employees = smaller organization = his job won't command the salary/eventual pension it currently does.

Submitted by SK in CV on June 27, 2016 - 6:43am.

So still no? Still nothing more than stories? No evidence? No data to support the 25% claim?

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 27, 2016 - 7:50am.

Back to Brexit. So the conservative leadership offered a choice they didn't support. Now that their pitchfork peasants have turned against them, what are they to do?

The conservative politics of division are resulting in economics of destruction. So much for good economic and wealth management.

Submitted by livinincali on June 27, 2016 - 8:42am.

FlyerInHi wrote:
Back to Brexit. So the conservative leadership offered a choice they didn't support. Now that their pitchfork peasants have turned against them, what are they to do?

The conservative politics of division are resulting in economics of destruction. So much for good economic and wealth management.

In Cameron's case resign. Leave won by about 1 million votes. It seems difficult to ignore the will of the people when you already put it up for a vote. I don't see why England can't negotiate favorable trade deals similar to what Switzerland enjoys with the EU. If you're an English taxpayer why do you want Brussels deciding that your tax dollars should be used to support Greece or whatever else EU problem arises. In California we don't want Texas deciding our environmental policies.

Essentially the EU politicians in Brussels over played their power over sovereign nations in their migrant policies. It backfired on them. In the western world there's a relatively low demand for unskilled laborers. There's little reason to invite low skilled laborers into you country other than compassion. Economically it's stupid because you have to divert resources from your own citizens to foreign immigrants.

Submitted by spdrun on June 27, 2016 - 8:52am.

Total UK contributions to EU = something like $180 per taxpayer per year, USD equivalent at 1.4. The UK had control over its own borders -- it was under no obligation to invite immigrants from outside the EU. In fact, under EU rules, it could send them back from whence they initially entered the EU.

As far as skill sets, Schengen simply meant that all citizens of EU countries could work and study where it best suited them in 28 countries. It is/was a huge boon to 500 million+ human beings.

People need to think beyond nationalism when thinking about such regional blocs. Don't think: "those damn immigrants will steal my jerb." Think: "wow. This is amazing. I now have access to many other countries, not just my own back yard."

I'd love if the US became part of such a regional bloc with some countries to the north and south ;)

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 27, 2016 - 12:20pm.

bearishgurl wrote:
spdrun wrote:
By my revised estimate: 2400 students on the trolleys coming from the southernmost station near the border.

"Thousands" crossing by car driven by their parents. Say 3000?

"A thousand" by car driven by students themselves.

We're up to 6400 students, or 3.2% of entire student population. If it's concentrated in certain districts, it doesn't seem to be a county-wide issue, and the total number of students is relatively small compared to county population.

The cars driven by parents often have 3-4 students in each vehicle (not necessarily related but were driven into the US together). The "regular" cars/vans that used to park on my street for years (where the adult would get out, often carrying a baby or pushing a stroller) usually had 3-6 student-kids with her whom she walked thru the back gate of the elementary school every morning. Parents/relatives do not make their onerous trek into the US early in the morning without taking as many kids as possible with them. We had four "regular" vehicles every school year and sometimes six with Baja plates which would be parked in the same place every school morning to walk kids onto the school grounds and pick them up in the afternoon (total of 40-50 minutes of parking per day). This went on the entire time I lived there (12 years). High school kids also drive their relatives and neighbors over the border and to school (even if it is a different school, due to age of the passengers).

The relevant Districts that have the vast majority of these border crossing students enrolled are:

South Bay Union School District (K-6): 6000 (approx)
Chula Vista Elementary School District (K-6): 29,300
Sweetwater Union High School District (7-12): 42,000
National School District (K-6): 3000 (approx)

That's a total of approximately 80,300 students. I would take an educated guess that over 90% of the border crossing students into SD County every morning attend public school in one of the above districts. The other 10% are spread out in public schools elsewhere in the county which are closer to a parent's workplace.

I did not include CUSD (Coronado) because they are much stricter about granting interdistrict transfers and enrollment/residency issues over there. Therefore, I feel it is unlikely that more than a handful (if any) daily "border crossing students" were able to pass thru their "vetting system."

Add to the above 4 school districts San Ysidro Elementary (K-8) with approx 5300 students for a total of approximately 85,600 public school students for academic year 15-16 in South County, SD. Sorry, my mind was telling me there were five districts last night, but it was late ....

SY Elem Sch District apparently has a large homeless population among its students. A group of them are apparently living out of vehicles, etc:

http://inewsource.org/2016/05/03/homeles...

The Governor turned down its grant proposal (for academic year 15/16) for assistance in this regard. Ask yourselves why.

Which begs the question. How did little tiny San Ysidro (mostly commercial/industrial) get 5300 school age kids (presumably) living within its district?? What are their addresses? How many actual residential units does SY have?

Here in my microcosm of 91910 (west side), we have ONE soon to be 9th grader, ONE soon to be 5th grader and ONE soon to be senior in HS living in a neighborhood with approx 80 single family homes! Another 2 students attend public school in Rancho Del Rey (5 miles away) and Otay Ranch HS (9 miles away). Another 8 school-age kids residing here are homeschooled. That's 18 school-age kids for 80 homes, where just 3 are attending public schools in the attendance area! And they are all good schools, btw! The problem is that there are very few young parents who own/rent around here and the homes turn over very, very slowly (mostly due to Props 13, 58 and 193).

Hence, nearby Hilltop HS (SUHSD) was "significantly under-enrolled" in academic year '15-16. No duh. This has been going on for years but the district has now decided to utilize it better (since it spent over $40M in construction bonds to remodel it in the past decade or so):

http://sandiegofreepress.org/2016/03/par...

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 27, 2016 - 2:52pm.

spdrun wrote:
Total UK contributions to EU = something like $180 per taxpayer per year, USD equivalent at 1.4. The UK had control over its own borders -- it was under no obligation to invite immigrants from outside the EU. In fact, under EU rules, it could send them back from whence they initially entered the EU.

As far as skill sets, Schengen simply meant that all citizens of EU countries could work and study where it best suited them in 28 countries. It is/was a huge boon to 500 million+ human beings.

People need to think beyond nationalism when thinking about such regional blocs. Don't think: "those damn immigrants will steal my jerb." Think: "wow. This is amazing. I now have access to many other countries, not just my own back yard."

I'd love if the US became part of such a regional bloc with some countries to the north and south ;)

Exactly, spdrun. globalization means "wow I can live anywhere I like. Wow, commerce and freedom of movement make us all richer." What's not to like. People are so fearful of change.

Brexit and the Trump phenomenon are the losers revolting
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk...

Submitted by deadzone on June 27, 2016 - 3:28pm.

So in other words, are you not suggesting open borders?

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 28, 2016 - 9:47am.

deadzone wrote:
So in other words, are you not suggesting open borders?

I'm suggesting progressively closer integration so we may build a more perfect world.

Submitted by harvey on June 28, 2016 - 11:09am.

Can you find all the hate crimes committed in this poster?

I got to six and had to stop because I was overwhelmed with despair.

Such a horrible injustice inflicted on people of color.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 28, 2016 - 12:16pm.

Today is my down day. I really enjoyed watching the Brits discuss Brexit.
https://charlierose.com/videos/28290

One point they made is reason has been pushed aside.

Submitted by njtosd on June 28, 2016 - 8:39pm.

harvey wrote:

Can you find all the hate crimes committed in this poster?

I got to six and had to stop because I was overwhelmed with despair.

Such a horrible injustice inflicted on people of color.

By the Red Cross? http://wjla.com/news/nation-world/americ...

There's a difference between stupidity and a hate crime.

Submitted by no_such_reality on June 29, 2016 - 10:15am.

I feel sorry for you if you take a cartoon poster for safety from the Red Cross and after counting noses leap to it being "hate crime" or as the twitterina's skrieked 'super racist',

At worst it's unconscious bias. Sadly this is were our country is at, counting noses on everything.

How dare I and how could I possibly see "those kids are running, that guy is drinking a beer in a bottle, he's horsing around, they're shoving ..."

Oh, wait, backup, better count noses... Hey blue whale, what the f's up with this?

Curse that white privilege, I just saw people.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 29, 2016 - 12:20pm.

no_such_reality wrote:
I feel sorry for you if you take a cartoon poster for safety from the Red Cross and after counting noses leap to it being "hate crime" or as the twitterina's skrieked 'super racist',

At worst it's unconscious bias. Sadly this is were our country is at, counting noses on everything.

How dare I and how could I possibly see "those kids are running, that guy is drinking a beer in a bottle, he's horsing around, they're shoving ..."

Oh, wait, backup, better count noses... Hey blue whale, what the f's up with this?

Curse that white privilege, I just saw people.

NSR, I do agree that Black people are often too sensitive and unnecesarily worry about being dissed. But I do understand why.

But aren't we all sensitive? In other countries, people will tell you that you're too fat, too pale, teachers may says your kids aren't bright, etc.... We're kinda thin skinned here.

The white backlash that we see with trump is a result of White working class people feeling dissed for being non-cosmopolitan economic losers of low education. The rational thing to do would be to get a better education.

Submitted by SK in CV on June 29, 2016 - 12:25pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:

NSR, I do agree that Black people are often too sensitive and unnecesarily worry about being dissed. But I do understand why.


I don't get this. If you've never been black (which I presume you haven't), how can you possibly know if "Black people are often too sensitive"? You can't possibly ever see anything from the perspective of a black man. And I can tell you from first hand experience, if you've ever been part of a minority that has been discriminated against, the world does not look the same.

Submitted by PCinSD on June 29, 2016 - 1:52pm.

njtosd wrote:
harvey wrote:

Can you find all the hate crimes committed in this poster?

I got to six and had to stop because I was overwhelmed with despair.

Such a horrible injustice inflicted on people of color.

By the Red Cross? http://wjla.com/news/nation-world/americ...

There's a difference between stupidity and a hate crime.

I'm not seeing the problem here. According to the article: "all the "not cool" rule-breakers appear to be people of color".

That's a flat out lie. There's 5 "not cool" instances:

1. Top right is a very white guy with sunglasses holding a glass bottle. Obviously, no glass is allowed at the pool. Last I checked white people weren't considered people of color. Where's the outrage? Misclassifying a person like that. That's racist!

2. Top left are 2 boys running. One white, one black with a arrow pointing between them. Obviously, you aren't allowed to run around the pool. The arrow doesn't single out the person of color, but both the boys who are running. The white boy isn't a person of color. Oh, and they showed the black boy ahead of him in that foot race. That's racist!

3. Left of center appears to be a black boy diving into the pool. No diving? Not sure. So what.

4. Right of center is a kid who appears to be drowning? He looks like a dude with a tan, not a black kid. Same with the kid in the foreground.

5. Bottom, right. Looks like a black girl pushing a white girl into the pool. Obviously frowned upon. Racist? Of course not. Unless you see racism in everything.

Finally, I heard some nonsense about blacks are being stereotyped as not able to swim. The lifeguard on the right is black.

Should the Red Cross have known people would find a way to make it racist? Of course.

Submitted by Coronita on June 29, 2016 - 3:46pm.

PCinSD wrote:
njtosd wrote:
harvey wrote:

Can you find all the hate crimes committed in this poster?

I got to six and had to stop because I was overwhelmed with despair.

Such a horrible injustice inflicted on people of color.

By the Red Cross? http://wjla.com/news/nation-world/americ...

There's a difference between stupidity and a hate crime.

I'm not seeing the problem here. According to the article: "all the "not cool" rule-breakers appear to be people of color".

That's a flat out lie. There's 5 "not cool" instances:

1. Top right is a very white guy with sunglasses holding a glass bottle. Obviously, no glass is allowed at the pool. Last I checked white people weren't considered people of color. Where's the outrage? Misclassifying a person like that. That's racist!

2. Top left are 2 boys running. One white, one black with a arrow pointing between them. Obviously, you aren't allowed to run around the pool. The arrow doesn't single out the person of color, but both the boys who are running. The white boy isn't a person of color. Oh, and they showed the black boy ahead of him in that foot race. That's racist!

3. Left of center appears to be a black boy diving into the pool. No diving? Not sure. So what.

4. Right of center is a kid who appears to be drowning? He looks like a dude with a tan, not a black kid. Same with the kid in the foreground.

5. Bottom, right. Looks like a black girl pushing a white girl into the pool. Obviously frowned upon. Racist? Of course not. Unless you see racism in everything.

Finally, I heard some nonsense about blacks are being stereotyped as not able to swim. The lifeguard on the right is black.

Should the Red Cross have known people would find a way to make it racist? Of course.

Well I am offended. There is no asian representation in this cartoon. What is Red Cross thinking? Do they think us Asians never use the pool because we are too busy studying all the time?

Submitted by PCinSD on June 29, 2016 - 4:23pm.

flu wrote:
PCinSD wrote:
njtosd wrote:
harvey wrote:

Can you find all the hate crimes committed in this poster?

I got to six and had to stop because I was overwhelmed with despair.

Such a horrible injustice inflicted on people of color.

By the Red Cross? http://wjla.com/news/nation-world/americ...

There's a difference between stupidity and a hate crime.

I'm not seeing the problem here. According to the article: "all the "not cool" rule-breakers appear to be people of color".

That's a flat out lie. There's 5 "not cool" instances:

1. Top right is a very white guy with sunglasses holding a glass bottle. Obviously, no glass is allowed at the pool. Last I checked white people weren't considered people of color. Where's the outrage? Misclassifying a person like that. That's racist!

2. Top left are 2 boys running. One white, one black with a arrow pointing between them. Obviously, you aren't allowed to run around the pool. The arrow doesn't single out the person of color, but both the boys who are running. The white boy isn't a person of color. Oh, and they showed the black boy ahead of him in that foot race. That's racist!

3. Left of center appears to be a black boy diving into the pool. No diving? Not sure. So what.

4. Right of center is a kid who appears to be drowning? He looks like a dude with a tan, not a black kid. Same with the kid in the foreground.

5. Bottom, right. Looks like a black girl pushing a white girl into the pool. Obviously frowned upon. Racist? Of course not. Unless you see racism in everything.

Finally, I heard some nonsense about blacks are being stereotyped as not able to swim. The lifeguard on the right is black.

Should the Red Cross have known people would find a way to make it racist? Of course.

Well I am offended. There is no asian representation in this cartoon. What is Red Cross thinking? Do they think us Asians never use the pool because we are too busy studying all the time?

True. But . . . the dude in sunglasses carrying the bottle could be Asian. Go with that.

Submitted by njtosd on June 30, 2016 - 6:19am.

SK in CV wrote:
FlyerInHi wrote:

NSR, I do agree that Black people are often too sensitive and unnecesarily worry about being dissed. But I do understand why.


I don't get this. If you've never been black (which I presume you haven't), how can you possibly know if "Black people are often too sensitive"? You can't possibly ever see anything from the perspective of a black man. And I can tell you from first hand experience, if you've ever been part of a minority that has been discriminated against, the world does not look the same.

Just for the sake of argument - since you can only know your own perspective, whatever that may be, how can you know "the world does not look the same" as it does to someone else? That would require understanding two perspectives and comparing them, which you have said can't be done. All that being said, I think the "too sensitive" comment was an unjustified sweeping generalization - but Brian knows I disagree with him most of the time.

Submitted by harvey on June 30, 2016 - 6:59am.

SK in CV wrote:

I don't get this. If you've never been black (which I presume you haven't), how can you possibly know if "Black people are often too sensitive"? You can't possibly ever see anything from the perspective of a black man. And I can tell you from first hand experience, if you've ever been part of a minority that has been discriminated against, the world does not look the same.

LOL, "I don't know your race but I'll presume you are aren't black so I can take an opportunity to call you a racist and tell you that I'm better than you because of my own minority status."

The SJW fights on!

Tell us more about your first hand experience...

Submitted by SK in CV on June 30, 2016 - 7:27am.

njtosd wrote:
SK in CV wrote:
FlyerInHi wrote:

NSR, I do agree that Black people are often too sensitive and unnecesarily worry about being dissed. But I do understand why.


I don't get this. If you've never been black (which I presume you haven't), how can you possibly know if "Black people are often too sensitive"? You can't possibly ever see anything from the perspective of a black man. And I can tell you from first hand experience, if you've ever been part of a minority that has been discriminated against, the world does not look the same.

Just for the sake of argument - since you can only know your own perspective, whatever that may be, how can you know "the world does not look the same" as it does to someone else? That would require understanding two perspectives and comparing them, which you have said can't be done. All that being said, I think the "too sensitive" comment was an unjustified sweeping generalization - but Brian knows I disagree with him most of the time.

I guess I can't know that the world does not look the same. What I do know is that I've been sensitive to what others have said or done, and others couldn't see my perspective. But none of the others had ever opened up a job rejection letter that said "We won't hire you because we don't hire jew boys".

Submitted by no_such_reality on June 30, 2016 - 8:59am.

SK in CV wrote:
njtosd wrote:
SK in CV wrote:
FlyerInHi wrote:

NSR, I do agree that Black people are often too sensitive and unnecesarily worry about being dissed. But I do understand why.


I don't get this. If you've never been black (which I presume you haven't), how can you possibly know if "Black people are often too sensitive"? You can't possibly ever see anything from the perspective of a black man. And I can tell you from first hand experience, if you've ever been part of a minority that has been discriminated against, the world does not look the same.

Just for the sake of argument - since you can only know your own perspective, whatever that may be, how can you know "the world does not look the same" as it does to someone else? That would require understanding two perspectives and comparing them, which you have said can't be done. All that being said, I think the "too sensitive" comment was an unjustified sweeping generalization - but Brian knows I disagree with him most of the time.

I guess I can't know that the world does not look the same. What I do know is that I've been sensitive to what others have said or done, and others couldn't see my perspective. But none of the others had ever opened up a job rejection letter that said "We won't hire you because we don't hire jew boys".

Yea, never mind the being told not to bother even applying because the company really needs an AA hire in the spot...

Oh, I forgot, anything AA isn't racist. Granted this was back in the day before people got PC and figured out that saying stuff like that goes really bad.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 30, 2016 - 12:58pm.

SK in CV wrote:
FlyerInHi wrote:

NSR, I do agree that Black people are often too sensitive and unnecesarily worry about being dissed. But I do understand why.


I don't get this. If you've never been black (which I presume you haven't), how can you possibly know if "Black people are often too sensitive"? You can't possibly ever see anything from the perspective of a black man. And I can tell you from first hand experience, if you've ever been part of a minority that has been discriminated against, the world does not look the same.

SK, I understand what you're saying that's why I'm not bothered by PC.

I was trying to say that people who bitch most about PC, such as Trump supporters, are themselves the biggest paranoid crybabies. They are the dominant culture but they see conspiracies against them all over the place. If their culture is so good then people will embrace it and they have nothing to fear.

Timely article on "telling it like it is". Yes, my original comment about blacks being too sensitive was lazy. But I did try to expand a little bit.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/pos...

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 30, 2016 - 3:32pm.

livinincali wrote:
FlyerInHi wrote:
Back to Brexit. So the conservative leadership offered a choice they didn't support. Now that their pitchfork peasants have turned against them, what are they to do?

The conservative politics of division are resulting in economics of destruction. So much for good economic and wealth management.

In Cameron's case resign. Leave won by about 1 million votes. It seems difficult to ignore the will of the people when you already put it up for a vote. I don't see why England can't negotiate favorable trade deals similar to what Switzerland enjoys with the EU. If you're an English taxpayer why do you want Brussels deciding that your tax dollars should be used to support Greece or whatever else EU problem arises. In California we don't want Texas deciding our environmental policies.

Essentially the EU politicians in Brussels over played their power over sovereign nations in their migrant policies. It backfired on them. In the western world there's a relatively low demand for unskilled laborers. There's little reason to invite low skilled laborers into you country other than compassion. Economically it's stupid because you have to divert resources from your own citizens to foreign immigrants.

We shall see.. (I love how the Brits use the term shall).

Here's my take on it.

The whole of the British establishment is very worried. Cameron gambled and he lost. He irreparably split the conservative party. The City of London that depends on financial services and supported the conservatives is reeling.

Britain is not Switzerland. Even Switzerland has fairly open work visas and welcomes lots of workers commuting daily into the country to work. The reason workers don't live in Switzerland is because it's expensive.

In order to remain the financial center, Britain needs freedom of movement as the majority of workers are not British citizens. The UK can certainly prosper outside of the EU and become a free-trade zone like Singapore or Dubai, in which case they cannot limit immigration. That will rile up the conservative base.

I don't see how Brussels overplayed anything. It's UK politicians who used politics of fear who overplayed.

As far are low-skilled workers, yes we all need them to do construction, plumbing, cleaning, etc... Polish and Eastern European immigrants in Britain work hard and help build the country. They are actually fairly well-educated but willing to work below their qualifications. They value education and their kids are moving on up. That's where the resentment from working class Brits lies.

I see Berlin, Frankfurt and Paris attracting businesses from London. Berlin is especially attractive because of strength of the German economy and low real estate prices. And BTW, Germany is becoming a multicultural nation more like the USA. And they are the economic powerhouse of Europe. Compare that to the xenophobia of the 1990s when Germany was the sick man of Europe.

We shall see....

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 30, 2016 - 4:07pm.

With all the xenophobia in the UK and the US, it's so nice to have a leader like Justin Trudeau and a country like Canada where many Brits now want to move to.

sponsor syrian refugee is top google search
http://www.cbc.ca/news/trending/how-to-s...
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/01/world/...

Why can't we have a hero like Trudeau in USA? I'm glad Obama honored Trudeau with a state dinner right after he was elected.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ju...

Submitted by njtosd on July 1, 2016 - 12:04am.

SK in CV wrote:
njtosd wrote:
SK in CV wrote:
FlyerInHi wrote:

NSR, I do agree that Black people are often too sensitive and unnecesarily worry about being dissed. But I do understand why.


I don't get this. If you've never been black (which I presume you haven't), how can you possibly know if "Black people are often too sensitive"? You can't possibly ever see anything from the perspective of a black man. And I can tell you from first hand experience, if you've ever been part of a minority that has been discriminated against, the world does not look the same.

Just for the sake of argument - since you can only know your own perspective, whatever that may be, how can you know "the world does not look the same" as it does to someone else? That would require understanding two perspectives and comparing them, which you have said can't be done. All that being said, I think the "too sensitive" comment was an unjustified sweeping generalization - but Brian knows I disagree with him most of the time.

I guess I can't know that the world does not look the same. What I do know is that I've been sensitive to what others have said or done, and others couldn't see my perspective. But none of the others had ever opened up a job rejection letter that said "We won't hire you because we don't hire jew boys".

I think you would have a hard time finding someone who hasn't been excluded from something for reasons of prejudice. Women, those who are short, tall, not wealthy, not attractive, not from a certain cultural background, etc, etc. have all felt it. In the Upper peninsula of Michigan, they make fun of (and discriminate against) the Finns. The key is finding a way to succeed notwithstanding the prejudice.

Submitted by Essbee on July 1, 2016 - 6:17am.

I'll add one data point. 20 years ago, during college, I had a friend who had attended Bonita Vista High School in Chula Vista. One day, while hanging out, I met one of his former high school friends. Sure enough, that friend did indeed live in Tijuana (with his entire family) but had crossed the border every day to attend high school in the US. He openly admitted this.

I couldn't understand how this was "legal", considering that he wasn't a U.S. resident. Obviously, it wasn't legal. Basically, it was the phenomenon that BG has been talking about. I was kind of shocked by it all.

Submitted by SK in CV on July 1, 2016 - 7:05am.

njtosd wrote:
SK in CV wrote:
njtosd wrote:
SK in CV wrote:
FlyerInHi wrote:

NSR, I do agree that Black people are often too sensitive and unnecesarily worry about being dissed. But I do understand why.


I don't get this. If you've never been black (which I presume you haven't), how can you possibly know if "Black people are often too sensitive"? You can't possibly ever see anything from the perspective of a black man. And I can tell you from first hand experience, if you've ever been part of a minority that has been discriminated against, the world does not look the same.

Just for the sake of argument - since you can only know your own perspective, whatever that may be, how can you know "the world does not look the same" as it does to someone else? That would require understanding two perspectives and comparing them, which you have said can't be done. All that being said, I think the "too sensitive" comment was an unjustified sweeping generalization - but Brian knows I disagree with him most of the time.

I guess I can't know that the world does not look the same. What I do know is that I've been sensitive to what others have said or done, and others couldn't see my perspective. But none of the others had ever opened up a job rejection letter that said "We won't hire you because we don't hire jew boys".

I think you would have a hard time finding someone who hasn't been excluded from something for reasons of prejudice. Women, those who are short, tall, not wealthy, not attractive, not from a certain cultural background, etc, etc. have all felt it. In the Upper peninsula of Michigan, they make fun of (and discriminate against) the Finns. The key is finding a way to succeed notwithstanding the prejudice.

You've missed my point. Which is that calling a reaction to something like the referenced red cross poster "too sensitive" is absurd. Everyone's perception is different. Obviously, some here don't have any problem with it. Some even search for absurd excuses why it can't possibly be racist. Even two members of the same group may have different reactions.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on July 1, 2016 - 2:25pm.

Essbee wrote:
I'll add one data point. 20 years ago, during college, I had a friend who had attended Bonita Vista High School in Chula Vista. One day, while hanging out, I met one of his former high school friends. Sure enough, that friend did indeed live in Tijuana (with his entire family) but had crossed the border every day to attend high school in the US. He openly admitted this.

I couldn't understand how this was "legal", considering that he wasn't a U.S. resident. Obviously, it wasn't legal. Basically, it was the phenomenon that BG has been talking about. I was kind of shocked by it all.

I can see how this might work. For example that guy's grandparents lived in Chula Vista. The grandparents were his legal guardians.

I don't really see a problem... If the student were forced to physically live with the grandparents, then maybe the family would have made the sacrifice for the education and squeezed into a multi-family home. Plus it sounds like he now lives and works in USA. We are all better off for having educated him.

Even if he lives in Tijuana now, he likely crosses the border to to business in USA. The USA is first of mind for him and that benefits us economically, culturally, politically.

Just think of it this way... The Harvard JFK school of government welcomes students from across the globe because we want to influence the world to our way of life through education.

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