Another San Diegan moving to Denver (me!)

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Submitted by evolusd on June 7, 2010 - 12:52pm

I've given up. After graduating from USD in 2001 and watching the housing market boom and bust (not as far down as it should have gone due to govt intervention), my wife and I have given up on San Diego and are seriously considering a move to Denver.

Just got back from a long weekend scouting various suburbs for a home for my family (me, wife, 2 little ones and counting). Found numerous 4-5 bedroom homes, 3,000+ sf in the $325k - $375k range within 20 miles of downtown, where I would likely be working.

A few observations:

1. There were very few obese people; everyone seemed very health-conscious.

2. The Red Rocks Amphitheatre is AWESOME. Would love to see a concert there. Went up into the Rockies one day as well, which is also breathtaking.

3. Every suburb/master planned community had tons of parks, walking/biking trails and lakes/streams. Many houses back to a greenbelt or open space, making yards feel much bigger.

4. Almost every home has a basement; weird as I've lived in So Cal my whole life.

5. Taxes - property tax is usually under 1%, compounded by the fact that the house costs 50% of what it would here. State income tax is fixed at 4.63% vs 9%+ in the higher Cali brackets.

I'd like some of your thoughts. This is a huge life decision we are not taking lightly and I value the Pigg (most, anyway) opinion. I know...I know...it gets cold and snows there!

Submitted by bob2007 on June 7, 2010 - 1:07pm.

It has always helped me to put a dollar amount on the decision. If you moved to an inland location in CA, like you would be in Denver, what is the house price difference? For example if you say 375k vs. 600k, it on the order of 1k per month difference. Definitely a lot of money, but it is worth it to YOU.

There are certainly recurring costs as well and the state tax here is too high.

Submitted by nocommonsense on June 7, 2010 - 1:11pm.

I envy you for being able to make such a move. I say go for it. Having lived in various parts of the US, I really like the racial diversity in California, which would be my only reservation to move away. If you're not a minority, there's simply NO reason to miss California. Colorado is a great place. Enjoy it.

Submitted by SD Transplant on June 7, 2010 - 1:54pm.

thanks for sharing and best of luck to you.

Please keep us posted, my wife has been talking "let's move to CO" lately....I won't even show her this post since she will bash me (see, I told you it's not the end of the world)..

KEEP US POSTED of your experience

Submitted by blahblahblah on June 7, 2010 - 2:04pm.

nocommonsense wrote:
I envy you for being able to make such a move. I say go for it. Having lived in various parts of the US, I really like the racial diversity in California, which would be my only reservation to move away. If you're not a minority, there's simply NO reason to miss California. Colorado is a great place. Enjoy it.

I'm not a minority and I would miss a lot of things about California, including the diversity.

Colorado is nice too though, I could be happy there I think.

Submitted by UCGal on June 7, 2010 - 2:05pm.

My brother lived for 20 years in that part of the world. In Denver, Boulder, Arvada, and Ft. Collins. I spent a good part of the fall/winter of 2007 shuttling back and forth to Denver and Ft. Collins when my brother was sick.

Good things:
- It's gorgeous! Undeniably, take your breathe away gorgeous. The mountains are spectacular.

- It's less expensive. A lot less expensive. My brother owned 3 houses in 20 years - all were about 1/3 of what you'd pay in San Diego.

- You're right, people are very fit and active. My brother was a rock climber and cyclist - and that was pretty typical. Everyone there hikes, bikes, skies, etc.

- Good colleges and hospitals. I have to give serious props to University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora. I was super impressed with the medical care my brother received in his last weeks.

Things that might not be as good - depending on your viewpoint.

- People tend to be more overtly religious - more so than in San Diego. This is more pronounced as you get down towards Colorado Springs. If you like churchy folks -then this is not an issue. For some folks this might be an issue.

- The weather... In the fall and spring it is entirely unpredictable. 100 degrees and sunny - 2 hours later it's snowing. I've seen this first hand. There are also more twisters. A friend that lives near Denver Int'l had a twister and hail damage total her car and destroy her siding and roof 2 weeks ago. She has insurance - but it's unsettling.

- No beach. For me, that's a tough one to get past. But if you don't go to the beach much then it's a not issue.

Submitted by ArmoRealtor on June 7, 2010 - 2:09pm.

My gut say's go for it. You can always come back.

I do however have a really good friend from high school that did the same thing about 3 years ago and is in the process of coming back. I thought that everything was going great for him out there and was amazed when I heard he had put his house on the market that he purchased just over a year ago.

When I asked him why he's coming back his response to me was that he really misses being able to sit on the beach with his family and friends on the weekends. I do think that part of it is the aspect that we grew up surfing together and while many may try to say it is, the mountains are not the same. The second part of what he said was his family. He just had a baby girl and whether or not he admits it, in my mind that is why he is coming back. He came out for a couple weeks when she was born, but it was'nt enough and it never will be. I believe some people can live somewhere else and talk to family and others want their family to be more involved and vice versa. I would say that is a huge question you need to ask yourself. Is a few days a year with your family and friends enough? Sure you'll make new friends yada yada, but it will not be the same as the people that you grew up with and that people that watched you grow up.

Maybe that is some off topic rambling, but I hope it helps and wish you the best of luck either way. If your looking for a home in the bloomington area I know someone thats selling one!

Submitted by barnaby33 on June 7, 2010 - 2:12pm.

Denver is a big city but from everything I know its economy is more boom bust oriented than San Diego. Its also very Arid. The mountains are gorgeous, but are just like the beach. If you don't take advantage of them, you are living in Kansas next to them (A high dry plane with unpredictable weather).

Colorado Springs is home to angry Jesus (focus on the family), but its got its fair share of open minded folks too. Houses are cheaper, salaries are lower.

Even though my ex swore up and down that the Mexican food was better there, I think she's full of it.

Josh

Submitted by 5yearwaiter on June 7, 2010 - 2:44pm.

evolusd wrote:
I've given up.

I'd like some of your thoughts. This is a huge life decision we are not taking lightly and I value the Pigg (most, anyway) opinion. I know...I know...it gets cold and snows there!

If you think what you are doing is excellent approach. What left in CA ...? except the enviroment many folks compare. This sort of weather and environment you still get in many places. Don't forget onething, even today if you can able to buy home here there is no gurantee tomorrow (whenever you want to sell) there is any amount you can getback due to various things not controlled by you... a few here as my selftalk

We are not sure howmany deadly acts are going to be exercised by various groups that trying to damage US economically. Fortunately we escaped in recent two such terror acts. If any such hit again occurs our economy onceagin nosedive.

We are not looking even any nearby flash in the recovery path as this mostly these days tied up with Globalization and other several factors which I can't even think.

Instead of Blah Blah ... it is been proved try to living in Homes (after buying) became a pure luck and you need to sell that home with in THE PARTICULAR time if you need at least see some profit or squared-up, if you miss that time then one has to wait another big chunk of time to get that such chance or sell home with loss.

So bottomline is .. you are doing excellent and life is not tieup with only homebuying and wested there forever.

Submitted by Aecetia on June 7, 2010 - 2:51pm.

I would visit during another season, like winter, to see how you like the weather. I would also check out the schools and their scores since you have children. It is also better to move when they are young, too. Everything else sounds like a green light and I think basements are very nice to have. Keep us posted.

Submitted by aldante on June 7, 2010 - 4:05pm.

Congrats,
All I would say is be careful where you buy becasue of traffic patterns. It seems much better then here on the face of it but if you are are not careful you will have a bad commute. From what I remember 3 years ago, prices are relective of traffic on the freeways.

Submitted by LAAFTERHOURS on June 7, 2010 - 4:39pm.

After the 2007 fires, my wife and I went to Denver to check things out in wintertime. It was snowing one day, sunny and warm ( i was in a tshirt) the next. I drove up to loveland during a blizzard the next day and boarded in powder all day.

We really liked Denver and came away with a few places we considered a place to move the family to. With a massive tech center, it would be suitable for me for work or as a jump point for consultancy.

The market changed for the better (we were renters at the time) and san diego became more affordable. My job changed for the better also.

If we were ever to move from SD, that is the only place we both want to move to. We love it there, the only thing missing is the ocean.

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 7, 2010 - 5:49pm.

Aecetia wrote:
I would visit during another season, like winter, to see how you like the weather.

evolusd, I agree with Acetia here. I grew up in Alameda County, CA, but went to high school in Denver, CO. Now, I am old and it didn't have as many freeways or "suburbs" back then but the WEATHER has not changed. I learned to drive a stick shift with studded tires and always carried in the trunk during the winter the following: sandbags & extra tires for weight, rug and shovel, scrapers, broom, lighters, screwdriver, butter knife, tire chains, etc. Even after I could get my block heater off, my car door open, the eng. started/warmed up and all the windows cleaned off, I often spun 360 deg. circles after a snow, even in a heavy veh. with weight in the trunk. This happens to everyone who is not driving a four-wheel drive veh.

ALL YEAR ROUND I had to carry a stash of clothing in the car, as did everyone else I knew. Levis, halter top, down vest, jacket, windbreaker, turtleneck, hiking boots, jean shorts, swimsuit, sunscreen, gloves, moccasins, bandanas, longjohns, flip-flops, etc. From the foothills to the plains to the cornfields to neighorhood a little ways up a mtn, the temp. would commonly change from 30 deg. to 90 deg. and back to 30 deg. in the space of 14 HOURS! I never knew when I might have to duck into a gas station to change clothes. I was also highly allergic to the wind blowing the bark of dogwood trees and flying cotton into my eyes from the cottonwoods and the very arid climate there made my sinuses much worse. It was not until I arrived back in SD in the 70's and got "Blue Cross" coverage that a great ENT in Hillcrest cured me with "immunotherapy."

As an adult, I drove back to CO for 20 years in a row to ski and have seen some horrible fatal accidents (and had near misses myself) between semis or oil tankers and passenger vehicles driving in ice and snow and/or "whiteout" conditions.

evolusd wrote:
5. Taxes - property tax is usually under 1%, compounded by the fact that the house costs 50% of what it would here...

The grass always looks greener on the other side, evolusd. I don't know where you're getting your less than 1% tax rate info, but my siblings and I sold my mom's residence there after her death many years ago for $125,000 and the taxes on it at the time were $1,555 annually. There is no "Prop. 13-like" provision in CO law. The CO assessors can arbitrarily reassess properties at whim but usually do it by parcel map.

evolusd wrote:
Found numerous 4-5 bedroom homes, 3,000+ sf in the $325k - $375k range within 20 miles of downtown, where I would likely be working.

evolusd, are you aware that "20 miles" in low-vis. snowstorm or following a salt truck or plow could take almost two hours?? May I suggest you consider buying in town and drive the surface sts. 2-4 mi. (if your employer offers pkg.) or walk to catch the newer "light rail" (like SD trolley) to downtown and stay OFF the dangerously slick freeways eight mos. year? Even though the prices of this area are comparable with SD, I would highly recommend zips 80209 and 80210 for family-sized (2000+ sf) homes with full basements in which you will be able to recover your purchase price. Due to their solid brick construction with beautiful porches, fireplaces and built-ins, you may get a little more "bang for your buck" than SD. "South HS" and "JFK HS" have always been very good schools and my understanding is that their feeder elem/middle schools are very good as well.

My last two residences there were on S. Logan and S. Clarkson Sts. and I was UTTERLY SHOCKED when I recently discovered online how much improved and "upscale" this entire area is now!

Here is an excerpt of my posting from May 25 in the "Buying a house at the new top of the market?" thread in the "Buying and Selling RE" forum:

bearishgurl wrote:
I wish there was a very telling map for SD Co. like the one I found in this article last night from the Denver Post which shows the percentages of underwater homeowners in each zip.

http://www.denverpost.com/business/ci_11...

The high percentages denote instability and potential further price softness in those affected zips. Because they were properties purchased ONLY in the last five years, this shows that fewer transactions occurred in the more stable zips and those which occurred there were less likely to have been using toxic loans.

Not surprisingly, the Denver City/Co. zips of 80209 ("Wash. Park") and 80210 ("Bonnie Brae") are the 3rd and 4th most stable after Arvada West - Foothills (80007) and Coal Creek Cyn - Golden (80403), both in the foothills of Jefferson Co. Why?? Because the two Denver zips are among the most well-located, whose SFR stock consists of mostly larger solid brick bungalows from 60-90 years old, with full basements on ample lots. These two zips obviously have a great deal of high-equity and free-and-clear owners, natural beauty and many *free* amenities as well, hence their (often much) higher asking prices than the avg. for the overall mkt.

Please study the map carefully at the bottom of the link provided.

In short, evolusd, the bulk of the Denver metro market is now heavily overbuilt and its owners are deeply underwater with their mortgages, even moreso than SD. You pay for what you get in this life. If I were you, I'd BE SURE if I was buying in one of those far-flung zips you are thinking about commuting from that you buy the property AS CHEAPLY AS POSSIBLE so if you find yourself axed from your new job or you and your family just get homesick and want to move back home, you HAVE THAT CHOICE and are not STUCK in an overmortgaged property or unable to recover your downpayment, like the majority of recent owners there are.

I know my experience living there was 35-40 yrs. ago, but I can't emphasize it enough, evolusd, that you should STUDY THE MAP at the bottom of the link I provided. It is very eye-opening, to say the least. And bear in mind, it's a different kind of life there - a lot more work. We bitch a lot here in SD, but our lives are EASY compared to those living in a harsh and unforgiving climate (at the constant mercy of the Rockies).

Agree about Red Rocks Ampitheatre. Your mention of it made me want to see who's on the schedule this summer and make a road trip - LOL. I saw many an artist there in the early - mid 70's. RRA and hiking the flatirons bring back a lot of great memories for me :)

Submitted by svelte on June 7, 2010 - 6:06pm.

If you've lived in SoCal your whole life and are in a spot where you can pick up and move, then I don't need to know any more...you should go.

Everyone should enjoy a cross-section of the experiences this country has to offer, and you just can't do that living in one area your whole life (visiting it just isn't the same as living it).

Worst case, you move back here in a few years with a great bunch of memories of Colorado. Best case, you love it there and just kicked your life up a few notches.

Go for it.

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 7, 2010 - 6:36pm.

I just discovered that the link to the April Denver Post article with the Zillow upside-down mortgage map has expired.

I have the map printed out and will try to scan it tonite.

Submitted by Nor-LA-SD-guy on June 7, 2010 - 6:59pm.

Just to be even, (and honest)

Most people I know moved there had a very hard time moving back (Job, home, other things the tie you down) so it's not that easy to just pick up and move back trust me, especially if you have family and the longer you are away the harder it will be to get back..

but good luck

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 7, 2010 - 7:21pm.

Here is the link, which was syndicated. It's actually from 11/08. Since the article spans 5 years, one could assume from reading it that the Denver market began to "run up" with toxic mtgs about 11/03. That could have been a little before SD did but I don't know.

Don't know if the situation in some of these zips has improved since then. That would be something to check into.

http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_110988...

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 7, 2010 - 8:04pm.

evolusd wrote:
I've given up. After graduating from USD in 2001 and watching the housing market boom and bust (not as far down as it should have gone due to govt intervention), my wife and I have given up on San Diego and are seriously considering a move to Denver.

Why have you "given up" evolusd? SD prices are still falling. IMO, More patience is needed here.

evolusd wrote:
Just got back from a long weekend scouting various suburbs for a home for my family (me, wife, 2 little ones and counting). Found numerous 4-5 bedroom homes, 3,000+ sf in the $325k - $375k range within 20 miles of downtown, where I would likely be working.

If you looked for properties in the non-coastal counties of CA (ex. RIV, San Bern., Placer, Merced, Stanislaus Counties), you would find these prices minus the harsh living conditions of CO.

evolusd wrote:
3. Every suburb/master planned community had tons of parks, walking/biking trails and lakes/streams. Many houses back to a greenbelt or open space, making yards feel much bigger.

Are you suggesting that the lots in the MP communities ARE NOT actually big but just FEEL BIG?

SD County has many "master-planned communities" like this as well. Wherever you find them, you also find HOA dues. Do you know if CO has any community facilities bond acts such as the Mello-Roos Bonds in CA and if they are in force in the communities you are looking in? Since you had a concern about property taxes, IMHO, this is definitely something you should look into.

Evolusd, how do you know that "government intervention" isn't currently "propping up" Denver's prices to more than their actual value?? Recent online articles DO suggest that this IS happening.

If you are just sold on the mtns and skiing in CO, you can always go skiing once a year and keep your veh parked in the hotel/condo underground garage and LET IT SNOW, while you ski your way down to your room in the eves, then quickly depart for one-hr.+ of the hot tub and sauna, holding your jumbo plastic cup of wine (or whatever your pleasure is). I did this for YEARS to get my stress-free CO fix. When our week was up, we turned our veh. west and headed back to CA. Before exiting CO, we frequently stopped at Glenwood Sprs. and took a dip in the natural hot spring pool, then got back on the road with a new lease on life. In other words, you don't have to actually live there, you can just play in it and then LEAVE ;)

Submitted by svelte on June 7, 2010 - 8:30pm.

Nor-LA-SD-guy wrote:

Most people I know moved there had a very hard time moving back (Job, home, other things the tie you down) so it's not that easy to just pick up and move back trust me, especially if you have family and the longer you are away the harder it will be to get back..

This can be very true, I should have pointed that out also.

I have found that, once kids hit about 10-12 years old, moving long distances gets much more difficult. They get social ties, you get social ties, they stop viewing moving as an adventure, on and on. It's still possible to move, but you risk them viewing you as Satan.

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 7, 2010 - 8:30pm.

i spent 6 years in a cool western state and wouldve stayed there if it were up to me. i expect life will be better in CO than CA.

Submitted by abell on June 8, 2010 - 8:09am.

If you have young kids, and family is in San Diego (you didn't say they were or not, so I am just guesing they might be), I would try to stay here or somewhere close (Southern California if you don't want to stay in San Diego). This way the kids will get to see them frequently and feel like a part of a bigger family. If you have family in CO or grandparents will move there too, then go for it.

Submitted by CubicleBoundHelot on June 8, 2010 - 8:42am.

I moved to Penasquitos from Denver (University and Hampden) about four years ago. Both of those areas are known for their schools (Cherry Creek district vs Poway District). I imagine that might be a consideration in your choice of Denver suburbs.

To your points :
(1) I read in 2007 that Colorado is the "least obese" state in the nation.
(2) Red Rocks is gorgeous, but how often will you get there ? The same goes for skiing. Traveling up I-70 to the mountains on a winter weekend is no fun; the roads are crowded, icy, and dangerous.
(4)Of course, housing is much cheaper. I rented in both places - the difference for rent was approx. $700/month
That was just me - keep in mind that I would so suck on "The Price is Right"
(5) Keep in mind the utilities. We had to pay for trash pickup from a private company (approx $50/month)
The infrastructure in our older area did not yet support cable connectivity or VOIP, so our internet connection was DSL and our phone bills were much higher

Don't let the weather scare you. It's true that the weather changes radically from day to day. At that elevation, when the sun is out (which is most of the time), 50 degrees can be short sleeve weather - just don't stay in the shade. It snows like mad - two days later, it's mostly melted away. The sun there is intense.

And mostly, don't worry strictly about the numbers.
As a fortune cookie might say:
"Success is not always happiness, but happiness is always a success"

Submitted by mixxalot on June 8, 2010 - 10:05am.

My thoughts on Denver and Colorado

I had a job interview there and while it was nice place and a lot cheaper than San Diego, it was not for me. One, I do not like cold weather or snow. If it was not cold and snow would be there however. Arizona is too hot the opposite problem.

Submitted by Nor-LA-SD-guy on June 8, 2010 - 10:15am.

mixxalot wrote:
My thoughts on Denver and Colorado

I had a job interview there and while it was nice place and a lot cheaper than San Diego, it was not for me. One, I do not like cold weather or snow. If it was not cold and snow would be there however. Arizona is too hot the opposite problem.

Yes if only these places had the SD weather, Ocean and it was in the U.S.A I could move there.

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 8, 2010 - 10:51am.

CubicleBoundHelot wrote:
I moved to Penasquitos from Denver (University and Hampden) about four years ago. Both of those areas are known for their schools (Cherry Creek district vs Poway District). I imagine that might be a consideration in your choice of Denver suburbs.

Excellent area CBH and only about 6 mi. or so from dtn. I was familiar with that area as well as Washington Park, Bonnie Brae and Englewood / Greenwood Village. evolusd, the areas served by South HS, JFK HS, GWHS and CCHS are great well-located family areas blessed with naturally beautiful parks with 80+ yr. old trees, golf courses and lakes but ARE NOT comprised of NEW CONSTRUCTION such as what you may have seen in the MP communities you visited. Except for Cherry Creek area and "Parker" (further out, past tech cntr.), which may have developments as new as 20-25 yrs. old, those other areas are 50-100 years old.

CubicleBoundHelot wrote:

(1) I read in 2007 that Colorado is the "least obese" state in the nation.

Piggs, dont laugh, but this is probably due to all the extra energy expended breathing.

CubicleBoundHelot wrote:

(2) Red Rocks is gorgeous, but how often will you get there ? The same goes for skiing. Traveling up I-70 to the mountains on a winter weekend is no fun; the roads are crowded, icy, and dangerous.

Not if you approach the slopes from the west (Grand Junction, etc.) and leave towards the west. It may still be an icy and dangerous endeavor, but you don't have the thousands of other drivers to slide into. Thus, the way back to CA after a ruff week on the slopes :)

CubicleBoundHelot wrote:

(4)Of course, housing is much cheaper. I rented in both places - the difference for rent was approx. $700/month . . .

This is interesting, CBH. When I looked on the Keller Williams Denver site recently, I noticed that asking prices (for listed props.) were not unlike SD's for a comparable area. I don't know about rents. Do you rent a larger house in PQ than you did in Denver?

CubicleBoundHelot wrote:

(5) Keep in mind the utilities. We had to pay for trash pickup from a private company (approx $50/month).

So true, there's no antiquated "People's Ordinance" when you leave SD. I also want to add heat for 8 mos. yr. In the above-mentioned areas, besides gas furnaces, radiant heat (used in apts.), baseboard (elec.) heat and even hot-water heat is still prevalent there. All are expensive.

CubicleBoundHelot wrote:
The infrastructure in our older area did not yet support cable connectivity or VOIP, so our internet connection was DSL and our phone bills were much higher.

This is probably fixed by now. Check on if interested in a particular property.

CubicleBoundHelot wrote:
Don't let the weather scare you. It's true that the weather changes radically from day to day. At that elevation, when the sun is out (which is most of the time), 50 degrees can be short sleeve weather - just don't stay in the shade. It snows like mad - two days later, it's mostly melted away. The sun there is intense.

Wear a lot of sunscreen if you tend to burn and apply it frequently to your children. There is no "ozone layer" there and it is EASY to burn quickly and badly, even on an overcast day. The sun beats down on the snow and reflects off it. I've seen many 20-something lift operators there with the leather skin of a 55 yr old construction worker.

CubicleBoundHelot wrote:
And mostly, don't worry strictly about the numbers. . .

If I was plunking down a hard-earned downpayment and mortgaging my life away, I WOULD be concerned about purchasing in an (unstable) zip that has or had >40% of "underwater" homeowners. I wouldn't want to see my neighborhood turn into a weed-infested ghost town. Actually, I would have a problem investing in an area with more than 20%, but that's just me. Study the (circa 11/08) map in the above link and find out if any zips you are interested in are better or worse off now.

Submitted by sdduuuude on June 8, 2010 - 10:59am.

Denver is pretty nice. I've been there on business. Leans a little to far to the "too religious" for me.

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 8, 2010 - 11:37am.

nocommonsense wrote:
I envy you for being able to make such a move. I say go for it. Having lived in various parts of the US, I really like the racial diversity in California, which would be my only reservation to move away. If you're not a minority, there's simply NO reason to miss California. Colorado is a great place. Enjoy it.

nocommonsense, do you consider "Hispanic" a minority? When I left CO and moved to SD in the seventies, the state was heavily Hispanic overall and Denver was about 17% Black at that time. Many smaller cities and towns in CO have a >75% Hispanic population. CO's leadership and representatives have ALWAYS been reflective of its population, even back then. The 2008 numbers suggest this as well.

http://www.classbrain.com/artstate/publi...

Acc. to the above link, Colo. had 71% of its citizens in 2008 claiming to be of "non-Hispanic caucasian" descent. I would consider it to be diversified. BTW, I "give the impression" that I am of one "race" but in fact am of mixed heritage and therefore am a "qualified minority." :)

Denver to SD = similar demographics but VASTLY DIFFERENT terrain and weather.

Submitted by nocommonsense on June 8, 2010 - 12:15pm.

bearishgurl wrote:

nocommonsense, do you consider "Hispanic" a minority?

What are you talking about? Hispanics are the majority here too in SD :) No I don't consider them a minority. I was thinking of asians.

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 8, 2010 - 1:58pm.

nocommonsense wrote:
What are you talking about? Hispanics are the majority here too in SD :) No I don't consider them a minority. I was thinking of asians.

Acc. to the my link above, in 2008, Denver County had:

50.9% Cauc (C)
34.3% Hisp (H)
10.0% Black (B)
3.4% Asian (A)
1.4% Native Am. (NA)
.2% Haw/Pac Is (PI)

Acc. to http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/... SD County in 2008 had VERY SIMILAR demographics as Denver County:

50.9% C
30.9% H
10.3% A
5.5% B
1.0% NA
.5% PI

Since Denver is a "metro area" comprised of four counties, I will add in some more stats.

Arapahoe County (home of high-paying jobs at the "Tech Cntr") had:

66.0% C
17.7% H
9.8% B
4.5% A
.8% NA
.2% PI

Jefferson County had:

79.9% C
14.2% H
2.6% A
1.6% B
1.0% NA
.2 PI

Adams County had:

56.1% C
35.6% H
3.5% B
3.3% A
1.4% NA
.2 PI

Acc. to http://www.denverpost.com/business/ci_43..., Weld County, CO had the HIGHEST FORECLOSURE RATE in the nation in 2006. "Greeley" (county seat) is a "bedroom community" (wheat field, stockyard and giant grasshopper territory with a smattering of oil rigs back in my day) located 65+ miles NE of Denver. Thousands of buyers moved there in recent years and attempted to commute to work to Denver (sound like RIV CO here, folks?).

FWIW, here are the demos for Weld County:

68.9% C
27.4% H
1.3% A
1.1% B
1.0% AI
.2 PI

Acc. to the 2008 Zillow map, posted earlier in this thread, Jefferson County had the two most stable homeowner zips (both located in the foothills of the Rockies) followed by Denver County for the 3rd and 4th most stable-homeowner zip (both urban core zips).

I just wanted to contribute to dispel any misconceptions about CO being percieved as "lacking in diversity." nocommonsense, A HIGHER PERCENTAGE of Denver County and Adams County's population is Hispanic than SD County's population, but there are definitely fewer Asians in CO than here.

Bear in mind that CO's ENTIRE POPULATION for 2008 was just over 5.5 million.

Submitted by evolusd on June 9, 2010 - 8:43am.

Thanks for all the input! We're very excited to try something different, that's for sure.

I'll keep you posted!

Submitted by CDMA ENG on June 9, 2010 - 9:22am.

sdduuuude wrote:
Denver is pretty nice. I've been there on business. Leans a little to far to the "too religious" for me.

My excellent friend. Denver is the most exceptional reperesentation of America there is.

To the south you have Colorado Springs... Small population of right wing religious gun tottin' conservatives...

To the North, Boulder... Nano Nano Mork and Mindy spaced out pot smoking tree hugging liberals...

And in between it all... and representative of the population of the US... Good ole moderate tolerant Denver.

And it is not white America like some ppl think... Hell there is even mafia there!

But seriously... Denver is a good place to live but you are a slave to the I25 and I originally got out because I never thought I could afford a home there. Remember Denver had a housing market crash shortly before the last one.

Also as for the skiing... It Sucks! Try getting back from the slopes on the I70 during the weekend. 4 hour trip minimum.

Plently of good Mexican food. Downtown is fun. And you have to eat at Carboni's on 38th Ave. Best Italian sandwich shop in the world. Two little old married Calabresi run it and yell at each other constantly. I would go eat there just to watch them bounce of each other.

Have a good trip to Denver and good luck!

CE

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