Am I obligated to tell my boss I am planning to move (and leave the company)?

Submitted by outtamojo on December 11, 2010 - 11:46am
Yes, I am morally obligated to say something
0% (0 votes)
No, just give two weeks notice.
100% (24 votes)
Total votes: 24
Submitted by outtamojo on December 11, 2010 - 11:54am.

OKay, this is the situation:

Beeen there for almost 20 years, but plan on definitley moving to San Marcos this summer or next summer at the latest. I was offered promotion 2 months ago, turned it down because position needed
specialized training and thought it bad form to take it since I was leaving anyway. I am going to be offered another promotion- this time with skill set I already have. I was gonna tell my boss yea I'll do it but I am planning on leaving this summer or the summer after but some of my closer co-workers said no I shouldn't say anything. What does the Pig community think? I didn't offer a middle of the road choice on the poll on purpose : )

Submitted by teaboy on December 11, 2010 - 12:20pm.

Surely this depends on the relative pros & cons specific to your particular situation...

Pros of giving more than the required 2 weeks notice:
-Some potential additional goodwill enjoyed with you boss/employers for the future.
-Possibility of being offered a decision changing promotion/raise.

Cons:
-Potentially worse work environment until you leave.

what else..?

tb

Submitted by urbanrealtor on December 11, 2010 - 12:24pm.

outtamojo wrote:
OKay, this is the situation:

Beeen there for almost 20 years, but plan on definitley moving to San Marcos this summer or next summer at the latest. I was offered promotion 2 months ago, turned it down because position needed
specialized training and thought it bad form to take it since I was leaving anyway. I am going to be offered another promotion- this time with skill set I already have. I was gonna tell my boss yea I'll do it but I am planning on leaving this summer or the summer after but some of my closer co-workers said no I shouldn't say anything. What does the Pig community think? I didn't offer a middle of the road choice on the poll on purpose : )

I wouldn't even have told the co-workers.
If the boss finds out he was the last to know there could be hard feelings.

I would offer notice only when being fired in frustration would be of little consequence financially.

I would offer when giving notice to ease the transition by whatever means (training a replacement, offering up to six months, whatever).

I get the sense that you are not going to another job but just moving.

If that is the case, then being fired may not be so bad for you.

A few years ago, I left my position in a financial services/ tax advising capacity.

I went out of town for 2 weeks (using up all my accrued vacation) and broke the news the day I got back.

He told me I was nuts and then offered me more (a lot more) money. By the end of the meeting, I was offered my full salary plus bonuses for half time.

That was crazy because I really don't think I was that much of an asset to the firm.

At any rate, he and I are still friends and I am sure if I needed a real job at some time in the future I could go to him.

I wish you luck.

Submitted by briansd1 on December 11, 2010 - 12:26pm.

Think of it this way: is your boss obligated to give you advance notice before firing you?

I believe that's it's only fair that employment at will is a two-way street.

Submitted by outtamojo on December 11, 2010 - 12:59pm.

Wow, 5-0 in favor of two weeks! Teaboy had good point about work environment until I actually left tho. I think the notice prior to leaving is gonna be 2 weeks + the length of time my new employer is willing to wait before I start. Thanks all.

Submitted by jeeman on December 11, 2010 - 1:50pm.

Ok, if you have been there for 20 years, you should have some good relationships built up. Be honest...it goes a far way. But talk about it around 2 months in advance. Two weeks isn't enough time for anyone to do anything about it, and three months is way too far out.

Submitted by LuckyInOC on December 11, 2010 - 2:06pm.

Until you can set a date of departure, you should not feel obligated to provide them any notice, especially when there is 1 year between the probable dates. I think it was appropriate to not take the promotion that would require the company additional cost. But, as for the other promotion, the company may benefit greatly from your service, even if it is only for 6-8 months. Your service could be for as much as 18 months. Not taking the promotion could damage the company more than helping. Things can change drastically in 6-18 months. San Marcos could fall into the sea by then...

Lucky In OC

Submitted by bob2007 on December 11, 2010 - 6:01pm.

I've been down that road. Great work environment and relationship, been there a long time. Thought I was doing them a favor by providing 2 months notice. It still turned out to be difficult for a number or reasons. But if you already told some people, its only a matter of time before the boss knows, so the cats out of the bag anyway. Maybe leave in next 2-4 weeks, and change to an hourly position or consulting if your work can be done that way. Theres just something about being officially "out" that seems to make coworkers accept it better.

Submitted by Hatfield on December 11, 2010 - 6:19pm.

I don't think you're under any obligation to give more than two weeks notice, but there are some pretty good reasons for doing so. Considering how long you've been there, I would give 2 or 3 months notice, and your message should be something along the lines of: "hey Boss, I just wanted to give you a heads-up that I am relocating and will be leaving the company in 2 months. My last day will be xx/xx/xxxx. I wanted to give you plenty of notice so you have ample time to hire a replacement so I can train this person before I go." And if you're thankful for the opportunities they've given you over the past 20 years, it doesn't hurt to mention that either.

You don't know what might happen 2 or 5 years down the road, and having been The Good Guy can do you no harm later on. You may cross paths one day with former coworkers or managers, and thee will be no downside to having done the classy thing.

This all assumes the place you're working is sane and doesn't have psycho office politics. But then if it did, I'm not sure why you would have stayed there for 20 years...

Submitted by moneymaker on December 11, 2010 - 7:18pm.

The last job I left I gave about 4 hours notice, I felt really bad about that but I did train someone else how to do 1 task before I left. I've never looked back and I'm pretty sure most employers today don't even give you a days notice. Most bigger companies will get alone just fine. I might add if you are retiring for good then follow your conscience, I've also heard of companies ending the relationship sooner even though you give notice. I've always had an easier time leaving a job than breaking up a romance, they are both on similar levels i suppose.

Submitted by patb on December 11, 2010 - 7:46pm.

if it's a good terms thing, just your life is changing, i'd say to the boss.

"Chief, My kids are in san marcos, and it's just
getting to me, i'd love to stay but, it's a personal
thing. If you want to hire a replacement, I get it.
i'll train them even help interview them. If you want
me to consult, i'd love that too.

But it's why i didn't take that last promotion.

Submitted by UCGal on December 11, 2010 - 8:11pm.

I would not give much notice - make sure everything is firm and final.

I've seen bosses get weird when you give notice or let them know you're thinking of changing jobs... Like you're disloyal and no longer reliable or trustworthy... Not all employers are like that - but I've seen it more than once. I even saw an employer tell a long term employee they might as well wrap things up that week rather than a wait the notice time.

I would absolutely NOT say anything till it's more of a done deal, with a hard date less than 3 months out.

Submitted by temeculaguy on December 11, 2010 - 10:44pm.

threadkiller wrote:
I've always had an easier time leaving a job than breaking up a romance, they are both on similar levels i suppose.

Amen Brother!

Submitted by meadandale on December 12, 2010 - 8:33am.

I had a job a few years back as a manager. When I decided to leave to take a better position I gave them plenty of notice figuring that it would take awhile to transition someone else in. I didn't want to leave them hanging by abruptly leaving; I figured that the respect was mutual.

It didn't go the way I thought it would.

It was more like trying to leave the mob. I was immediately cut out of all management meetings, left out of all management email correspondence and there was absolutely no attempt to try and transition someone into my position or at least do a brain dump so they didn't lose all of the information I had. I basically became a pariah and long time 'friends' in the company basically disowned me and would have nothing to do with me (including my boss).

I basically just spent 2 weeks at my desk playing video games on the Internet waiting for my final paycheck.

Your relationship with your employer is not always what you think it is...even after 20 years. Announcing that you are leaving can be as well received as announcing that you slept with the boss's 16 year old daughter at the xmas party.

Submitted by Diego Mamani on December 13, 2010 - 12:26am.

urbanrealtor wrote:
I wouldn't even have told the co-workers.
If the boss finds out he was the last to know there could be hard feelings.

I think it's human nature to overestimate others' capacity and willingness to keep a secret. Think about it, it's YOUR OWN secret and you couldn't keep it to yourself. Are you 100% sure that others will keep your secret?

IMHO, if your boss is a decent person and you get along with him at a personal level, you should talk to him ASAP before he hears it from someone else.